Tag Archives

Archive of posts published in the category: transportation
Nov
19

Transportation Inter California To Tijuana B C in Norwalk, CA with Reviews

YP – The Real Yellow PagesSM – helps you find the right local businesses to meet your specific needs. Search results are sorted by a combination of factors to give you a set of choices in response to your search criteria. These factors are similar to those you might use to determine which business to select from a local Yellow Pages directory, including proximity to where you are searching, expertise in the specific services or products you need, and comprehensive business information to help evaluate a business’s suitability for you. “Preferred” listings, or those with featured website buttons, indicate YP advertisers who directly provide information about their businesses to help consumers make more informed buying decisions. YP advertisers receive higher placement in the default ordering of search results and may appear in sponsored listings on the top, side, or bottom of the search results page.

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Oct
24

Transportation | Home

The journal Transportation focuses on issues of relevance to the formulation of policy, the preparation and evaluation of plans, and the day-to-day operational management of transport systems. It concerns itself with the policies and systems themselves, as well as with their impacts on and relationships with other aspects of the social, economic and physical environment.

Although the transportation needs of cities and nations around the world differ in detail, there is much benefit to be derived by sharing research findings and practical experience. Transportation lends itself to information exchange by publishing carefully selected papers which advance the international fund of knowledge. Transportation is relevant to all parts of the world: industrialized, newly industrialized or developing. Its mission is simply to help improve the transportation of people and goods by bringing an improved understanding of the subject to the theorists, practitioners and policy makers who study it.

Officially cited as: Transportation

  • Improves the transportation of people and goods by bringing an improved understanding of the subject to theorists, practitioners and policy makers
  • Relevant to all parts of the world: industrialized, newly industrialized or developing
  • Publishes carefully selected papers which advance the international fund of knowledge

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Oct
1

Transportation – Hopkinton Public School District

COVID-19 Transportation Information

The Hopkinton Public Schools, like all school districts across the Commonwealth, were charged with designing a reentry plan, unique to the needs of the Hopkinton Community, and in keeping with the “Initial Fall School Reopening Guidance”  issued by the Commissioner of Education, Jeffrey Riley on June 25, 2020.  Here is the Transportation specific information.  Please see the full reentry plan for more details.  

9/23/2020 Transportation Change Requests

9/15/20 New Legacy North Bus Stops

9/14/2020 Transportation Reminders

9/7/2020 Transportation Welcome Back letter

 

New Student ID’s / Z Pass

Students will be issued a new smart Student ID.  The ID will have the student ID number as a bar code, an RFID chip and a QR code.  This ID will function as the bus pass, enable touchless payments in the cafeteria and more.  For transportation, the student ID must be scanned upon entering and exiting the bus.  The RFID chip interfaces with the new system called

Z Pass.   Z Pass ridership capability enables the district to know who is on the bus and where and when they entered or exited. The information is transmitted to a secure database.  The transportation department will use this information to locate a rider, and improve routes and utilization.  This will increase safety and efficiency for the district.  The Student ID will come hole punched for attaching  to backpacks, lanyards etc.  Students must have their ID at all times for riding the bus.  There will be a replacement fee charged for lost or damaged cards.

 

The district provides transportation to students in grades Kindergarten (K) through grade six (6).  Students in grades seven (7) through twelve (12) must purchase a bus pass to be eligible for transportation. Every effort will be made to provide safe, comfortable and pleasant transportation service while maintaining an appropriate level of efficiency. 

Effective transportation service requires cooperation among bus drivers & staff, school administrators, students and parents/guardians.  Transportation rules and procedures are provided so you can be familiar with our expectations and the transportation procedures.  The bus is an extension of the classroom and the bus driver is an extension of the teacher, thus all district policies are also observed on district transportation.

The Transportation Office is located in the HPS Central Administration building at 
89 Hayden Rowe Street, Hopkinton, MA.

The new Student ID must be scanned upon entering and exiting the bus.  All students should be at their designated bus stop 5-10 minutes before their scheduled pick-up time.  It is the parent responsibility to get students to and from the bus stop.  Bus routes will be published the last week of August.  Please see below for additional information based on your student grade level.

GRADES K-5          GRADE 6          GRADES 7-12

 

Additional Information:

BUS CONDUCT ITEMS ALLOWED ON THE BUS PARKING PASS

 KINDERGARTEN PROTOCOLS TRANSPORTATION FAQ’s

Transportation Forms:

Application for Bus Pass (PAPER)      Bus Stop Review Request Form

PAY ONLINE USING THE MYSCHOOLBUCKS LINK BELOW – FOLLOW DIRECTIONS ON HOW TO PAY ONLINE HERE. 

OR PAPER APPLICATION BUTTON

Aug
21

Transportation | City of Tempe, AZ

The Transportation Division is responsible for street signage, pavement markings, barricading, traffic control, street maintenance, sidewalks, traffic signals, street lights, bus and light rail service, and bike lanes and paths.

BikeBusStreetsStreetscapeVisionZeroFacilitiesPermitsResourcesCommission

The Tempe Transportation Center is closed due to the coronavirus (COVID-19).
The Tempe Transit Store will be open effective June 15, 2020. Until June 15, to get a residential parking permit or youth transit pass or to schedule an appointment with staff, please email rpp@tempe.gov or call 480-858-2276 (Youth Transit Pass and RPP permits) or 480-350-8663 (all other appointments). 

Click here to report a problem with traffic signals, graffiti, streets, barricades, street lights or any other transportation issue.

For bus, Orbit, light rail and Express route complaints or suggestions, please call 602-253-5000 or email Valley Metro at csr@valleymetro.org.  

Sign up to receive the latest transportation news. 

Tempe Transportation Center

200 E. Fifth Street

Tempe, AZ 85281

480-350-4311

24-hour non-emergency: (480) 350-8311

The Tempe Transit Store is open Monday-Friday from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. and closed on major holidays. Local and reduced all-day, 7-day, 15-day, 31-day bus passes are available for purchase. Acceptable forms of payment include cash, VISA and MasterCard. Reduced Fare Program IDs are issued from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. weekdays.

The Deputy Director for Engineering & Transportation Department is  Shelly Seyler. For general questions about the transportation program, please contact Sue Taaffe

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Aug
20

Rural Opportunities to Use Transportation for Economic Success (ROUTES)


Rural Opportunities to Use Transportation for Economic Success (ROUTES) is an initiative to address disparities in rural transportation infrastructure. Specifically, rural transportation infrastructure’s unique challenges need to be considered in order to meet our Nation’s priority transportation goals of safety and economic competitiveness.

The ROUTES Initiative is needed for the Nation’s economy.

  • Rural transportation networks are critically important for domestic production and export of agriculture, mining, and energy commodities, as well as the quality of life for all Americans. 

  • Two-thirds of rail freight originates in rural areas, and nearly half of all truck vehicle-miles-traveled (VMT) occur on rural roads.   These industries require heavy trucks that create significantly more wear-and-tear on roadways. 

  • Ninety percent of posted (limited weight) bridges are in rural areas and heavy trucks cannot cross posted bridges – to find a safe bridge, heavy trucks hauling in rural areas must traverse three-times the distance as in metro areas.  

The ROUTES Initiative is needed for safety.

  • A disproportionate number of roadway fatalities occur in rural areas.  While only one-fifth of the nation’s population lives in rural areas, 46% of the nation’s highway fatalities occur on rural roads, 39% of all highway-rail crossing fatalities occur in rural areas, and the highway fatality rate is more than twice that in urban areas. 

  • In fact, 44% of personal vehicle miles traveled on rural roadways are actually urban residents traveling to destinations outside their home metro areas, so rural roadway safety matters for our entire country.

ROUTES Council

The ROUTES Council will be chaired by the Under Secretary for Transportation, which will oversee the ROUTES Infrastructure Management Team in three primary activities:

  • Collecting input from stakeholders on the benefits rural projects offer for safety and economic benefits, as well as the type and degree of assistance rural projects require

  • Providing user-friendly information to rural communities to assist them in understanding and applying for DOT discretionary grants

  • Improving DOT’s data-driven approaches to better assess needs and benefits of rural transportation infrastructure projects.

The ROUTES Initiative will be coordinated across key modal administrations, including the Federal Highway Administration (FHWA), the Federal Transit Administration (FTA), the Federal Rail Administration (FRA), and Federal Aviation Administration (FAA).

 

 

Subscribe here to receive ROUTES news and updates by email.

Last updated: Monday, August 17, 2020

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Aug
19

Phoenix Public Transportation | Get Around With Bus & Rail

  • Need to get from the airport to your downtown hotel? It will cost you $2 if you take Phoenix’s Valley Metro light-rail system. The cost of an all-day pass is $4.

  • But getting from the airport to downtown affordably is just one of light rail’s perks. The 28-mile line links Phoenix to the neighboring communities of Tempe and Mesa, and includes stops at attractions such as Phoenix Art Museum, Heard Museum, Chase Field, Talking Stick Resort Arena and Tempe’s Mill Avenue.

  • Light rail’s quiet, air-conditioned trains operate 18-22 hours per day, seven days a week, and stop every 12-20 minutes. The system operates at street level and is powered by electricity from overhead wires.

  • There are 38 stations along the line, and they are adorned with $8 million worth of public art. The artwork at each station reflects the character of the community where it is located. Station platforms can accommodate the boarding of 600 passengers onto a three-car train within 30 seconds. 

  • Convenient transportation to the airport comes by way of PHX Sky Train. This driverless people mover transports Valley Metro Light Rail passengers to the airport from the 44th Street/Washington Street station.

  • Maps


  • Source Article

    Aug
    11

    Transportation in New York City

    Transportation in New York City
    Map of New York Highlighting New York City.svg
    Map of the U.S. state of New York with New York City highlighted in red
    Overview
    Owner Metropolitan Transportation Authority, Port Authority of New York and New Jersey, State of New Jersey, other local governments
    Locale New York City metropolitan area
    Transit type Rapid transit, commuter rail, bus and bus rapid transit, light rail, people mover, aerial tramway, bicycle sharing system, taxicab
    Daily ridership More than 10 million
    Operation
    Operator(s) MTA, NJ Transit, PATH, Port Authority of New York and New Jersey, and private operators

    The transportation system of New York City is a network of complex infrastructural systems. New York City, being the most populous city in the United States, has a transportation system which includes one of the largest subway systems in the world; the world’s first mechanically ventilated vehicular tunnel; and an aerial tramway. New York City is also home to an extensive bus system in each of the five boroughs; citywide and Staten Island ferry systems; and numerous yellow taxis and boro taxis throughout the city. Private cars are less used compared to other cities in the rest of the United States.

    Within the New York City metropolitan area, the airport system—which includes John F. Kennedy International Airport, LaGuardia Airport, Newark Liberty International Airport (located in New Jersey), Stewart Airport and a few smaller facilities—is one of the largest in the world. The Port of New York and New Jersey, which includes the waterways around New York City and its metropolitan area, is one of the busiest seaports in the United States. There are also three commuter rail systems, the PATH rapid transit system to New Jersey, and various ferries between Manhattan and New Jersey. Numerous separate bus systems also operate to Westchester County, Nassau County, and New Jersey. For private vehicles, a system of expressways and parkways connects New York City with its suburbs.

    Background[edit]

    An 1807 version of grid plan for Manhattan.

    History[edit]

    The history of New York City’s transportation system began with the Dutch port of Nieuw Amsterdam. The port had maintained several roads; some were built atop former Lenape trails, others as “commuter” links to surrounding cities, and one was even paved by 1658 from orders of Petrus Stuyvesant, according to Burrow, et al.[1] The 19th century brought changes to the format of the system’s transport: the establishment of a Manhattan street grid through the Commissioners’ Plan of 1811,[2] as well as an unprecedented link between the then-separate cities of New York and Brooklyn via the Brooklyn Bridge, in 1883.[3]

    The Second Industrial Revolution fundamentally changed the city – the port infrastructure grew at such a rapid pace after the 1825 completion of the Erie Canal that New York became the most important connection between all of Europe and the interior of the United States. Elevated trains and subterranean transportation (‘El trains’ and ‘subways’) were introduced between 1867 and 1904. In 1904, the first subway line became operational.

    Jul
    9

    Transportation in Seattle – Wikipedia

    Transportation in Seattle is largely focused on the automobile much like many other cities in western North America; however Seattle is just old enough that its layout reflects the age when railways and trolleys predominated.[not verified in body] These older modes of transportation were made for a relatively well-defined downtown area and strong neighborhoods at the end of several former streetcar lines, now mostly bus lines.

    Because of the isthmus-like geography of Seattle and the concentration of jobs within the city,[not verified in body] much of the transportation movement in the Seattle metropolitan area is through the city proper. North-south transportation is highly dependent on the Interstate 5 corridor, which connects the Puget Sound area with southwest Washington cities, the Portland metropolitan area, and cities to the north such as Bellingham and Vancouver, Canada. I-5 continues as British Columbia Highway 99 at the US-Canada border’s Peace Arch crossing, between Blaine and Surrey. State Route 99 is also a major arterial in the western half of the city and included the now defunct Alaskan Way Viaduct along the Seattle waterfront. Because of seismic instability, the Alaskan Way Viaduct replacement tunnel was opened in place of the elevated viaduct in February 2019.

    Transportation to and from the east is via State Route 520’s Evergreen Point Floating Bridge and Interstate 90’s Lacey V. Murrow Memorial Bridge and Third Lake Washington Bridge, all over Lake Washington. Those bridges are the first, second, and fifth longest floating bridges in the world, respectively. State Route 522 connects Seattle to its northeastern suburbs.

    Two public transportation agencies serve Seattle: King County Metro, which operates local and commuter buses within King County, and Sound Transit, which operates commuter rail, light rail, and regional express buses within the greater Puget Sound region. In recent years, as Seattle’s population and employment has surged, transit has played an increasingly important role in transportation within the metro area. By 2017, nearly 50% of commuters to downtown Seattle arrived via mass transit.[1]

    Unlike most North American cities, water transportation remains important. Washington State Ferries, the largest ferry system in the United States and the third largest in the world, operates a passenger-only ferry from Colman Dock in Downtown to Vashon Island, car ferries from Colman Dock to Bainbridge Island and to Bremerton, and a car ferry from West Seattle to Vashon Island to Southworth. Seattle was once home to the Kalakala, a streamlined art deco-style ferry that sailed from the 1930s to the 1960s.[not verified in body]

    Seattle contains most of Boeing Field, officially called King County International Airport; but most airline passengers use Seattle-Tacoma International Airport in the city of SeaTac. Seattle is also served by three Amtrak routes from the King Street Station: the Cascades, Coast Starlight, and Empire Builder lines.

    History[edit]

    Even though Seattle is old enough that railways and streetcars once dominated its transportation system, the city is now largely dominated by automobiles, but has

    Jun
    28

    Long Distance Medical Transportation Long Distance Medical Transportation

    Specializing in Long Distance Non Emergency trips over 150 miles.

    • Non-Emergency Long Distance Medical Transportation

      Non-Emergency Long Distance Medical Transportation

    • State to State Transportation Services For The Disabled

      State to State Transportation Services For The Disabled

    • Cross Country Elderly Relocation Transportation Services

      Cross Country Elderly Relocation Transportation Services

    • Long Distance Ground Handicap Transportation

      Long Distance Ground Handicap Transportation

    Eastern Royal Medical Transport is a unique medical transportation company in that we specialize in the long distance transportation of stable elderly and disabled persons to and from Cheney, Kansas .

    Our transportation services are fully committed to providing non-emergency long distance medical transportation to the nation’s elderly and disabled population.

    As a specialist in non-emergency long distance medical transportation services, Eastern Royal Medical Transport has the necessary knowledge and skill to provide quality non-emergency long distance medical transportation. You can trust Eastern Royal Medical Transport to get your patient or loved one to their destination safely.

    Eastern Royal Medical Transport Provides a Cost Effective Alternative to Ambulance and Air Medical Transportation

    Eastern Royal Medical Transport recognizes the growing need for cost effective long distance medical transportation services.That is why we focus our services on non-emergency long distance medical ground transportation. Our goal is to provide persons seeking non-emergency medical transportation an alternative to the unnecessarily high costs of long distance ambulance or air medical transportation. We are the happy medium between emergency medical transportation and non medical transportation services. By removing the unnecessary emergency medical services we can lower our costs to a fraction of what an ambulance company charges for similar non-emergency medical transportation services.To achieve this cost effective means of transportation we place highly qualified medical personnel on our vehicles to ensure the quality and safety of every medical transport.

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    Jun
    26

    Transportation Safety Institute | US Department of Transportation

    Transportation Safety Institute Welcome by Troy Jackson, Ph.D. , Director (acting)

    Welcome to the Transportation Safety Institute!  The work that TSI does within the transportation safety community is truly remarkable.  With a small staff and group of highly committed subject matter experts who serve as adjunct faculty, TSI provides the best training for safety professionals in federal, state and local government agencies and the private industry. 

    Recently, TSI was recognized for its training in the Transportation of Infectious Substances, such as coronavirus.  You can access the article here: https://oklahoman.com/article/5660155/coronavirus-in-oklahoma-many-people-handling-coronavirus-samples-were-trained-in-okc.  The Fox25 report can be accessed here: https://okcfox.com/news/coronavirus/okc-based-office-trains-thousands-to-safely-transport-coronavirus-tests

    Whether it is face to face instruction in Oklahoma City, or anywhere else in the world, live virtual courses, or web-based training, TSI provides safety training to more than 25,000 people each year.  TSI has courses for all modes of travel, covering the transport of either people or material.  

    It is our goal to provide the most up to date training possible, using the latest materials, concepts, technologies and instructional infrastructure available.  In doing so, TSI provides an invaluable service to the world’s transportation system, making it safer for all that utilize it.

    I am extremely proud to be associated with my colleagues at TSI, I invite you to join us by utilizing the state of the art training we can make available to you.  Our course completion certificates carry the U.S. Department of Transportation seal and for over 40 years TSI has provided the best in transportation safety training to professionals both in and out of government.  I look forward to having you share in the TSI experience.  

     

    Transportation Saftey Institute (TSI) Logo

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