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Archive of posts published in the category: Tech
Apr
3

Flex automotive solutions for autonomous driving and smart tech integration |Flex.com


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Markets we serve

  • Autonomy
  • Connectivity
  • Electrification 
  • Smart tech





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Innovation



  • 2019 Automotive News PACE Innovation Partnership Award  
  • 2019, 2017 Automotive News PACE Award Finalist 
  • 2018 China Automobile and Parts Innovation Award 
  • 2017 CLEPA Innovation Awards (x2) 
  • 2016 General Motors Supplier of the Year Innovation Award  
  • 2016 China Automobile and Parts Industry Development and Innovation Awards – Technology Innovation Award 

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Supplier excellence



  • 2019 General Motors Supplier Quality Excellence Award 
  • 2019 Varroc Supplier Quality Award 
  • 2018 Magneti Marelli Motherson Overall Excellence Award 
  • 2018, 2017 Automotive News Top Supplier (#73) 
  • 2017, 2016 General Motors Supplier of the Year  
  • 2016 Ford World Excellence Award 

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Commercial awards



  • 2018 Knorr-Bremse Commercial Performance Award 
  • 2016 AISIN Cost Improvement Award 

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Certification awards



  • 2019, 2018, 2017, 2016 Ford Q1 Award  
  • 2016 General Motors BIQS Award 

  • 2019 Automotive News PACE Innovation Partnership Award  
  • 2019, 2017 Automotive News PACE Award Finalist 
  • 2018 China Automobile and Parts Innovation Award 
  • 2017 CLEPA Innovation Awards (x2) 
  • 2016 General Motors Supplier of the Year Innovation Award  
  • 2016 China Automobile and Parts Industry Development and Innovation Awards – Technology Innovation Award 
  • 2019 General Motors Supplier Quality Excellence Award 
  • 2019 Varroc Supplier Quality Award 
Mar
31

Tech and the future of transportation: From here to there

tech-transport-future-intro.jpg

Image: Kirillm, Getty Images/iStockphoto

Articles about technology and the future of transportation rarely used to get far without mentioning jet-packs: a staple of science fiction from the 1920s onwards, the jet pack became a reality in the 1960s in the shape of devices such as the Bell Rocket Belt. But despite many similar efforts, the skies over our cities remain stubbornly free of jet-pack-toting commuters.

For a novel form of transport to make a material difference to our lives, several key requirements must be satisfied. Obviously the new technology must work safely, and operate within an appropriate regulatory framework. But public acceptance and solid business models are also vital if a new idea is to move from R&D lab to testbed to early adoption, and eventually into mainstream usage.

There’s inevitably a lot of hype surrounding the future of transportation, but also plenty of substance, with big investments being made both by disruptive tech companies and by incumbent industry players. Can technology help to get us and our goods around quicker, in greater safety, and with less damage to the planet?

Connected & Autonomous Vehicles (CAVs)

google-waymo-car.jpg

Waymo’s fully self-driving Chrysler Pacifica Hybrid minivan on a public road.


Image: Waymo

Driverless cars, or Connected and Autonomous Vehicles (CAVs) are getting the lion’s share of attention, but the wider implications of CAVs and other novel forms of transport are also firmly on the agenda — including smarter, greener cities and more efficient distribution of freight and consumer deliveries.

To get an overview of a large part of this subject area, it’s worth examining Gartner’s Hype Cycle, and the 2017 status of technologies relating to connected vehicles and smart mobility:

gartner-hype-cycle-cvs-sm.png

Images: Gartner (top), ZDNet (bottom)

Most of the technologies listed here are in the early stages of the progression towards mainstream adoption, according to Gartner, with only five out of 30 making it beyond the Trough of Disillusionment.

No surprise, then, that there’s a lot of activity in the CAV market. In a report published last October The Brookings Institution collated reports of “investments and transactions attributable to autonomous vehicles or core technologies” between August 2014 and June 2017, and found over 160 separate deals amounting to some $80 billion. These covered auto electronics, microchips, rideshare apps, AI/deep learning, digital mapping, non-AI software, physical systems and sensors. The authors concluded that “investment in 2018 should be substantially more than the $80 billion disclosed from 2014 to 2017, and continue upward for some period of time as the race to deploy self-driving moves on.”

At the same time, public perception of autonomous vehicle safety seems to be heading in a positive direction. In a survey last year, Gartner found that while 55 percent of respondents (from the US and Germany) would not consider travelling in a fully autonomous car, 71 percent would ride in a partially autonomous vehicle.

These findings are echoed by the Deloitte 2018 Global Automotive Consumer Study, which found that the percentage of respondents considering fully self-driving vehicles unsafe ranged from