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Archive of posts published in the category: safety
Jun
26

Transportation Safety Institute | US Department of Transportation

Transportation Safety Institute Welcome by Troy Jackson, Ph.D. , Director (acting)

Welcome to the Transportation Safety Institute!  The work that TSI does within the transportation safety community is truly remarkable.  With a small staff and group of highly committed subject matter experts who serve as adjunct faculty, TSI provides the best training for safety professionals in federal, state and local government agencies and the private industry. 

Recently, TSI was recognized for its training in the Transportation of Infectious Substances, such as coronavirus.  You can access the article here: https://oklahoman.com/article/5660155/coronavirus-in-oklahoma-many-people-handling-coronavirus-samples-were-trained-in-okc.  The Fox25 report can be accessed here: https://okcfox.com/news/coronavirus/okc-based-office-trains-thousands-to-safely-transport-coronavirus-tests

Whether it is face to face instruction in Oklahoma City, or anywhere else in the world, live virtual courses, or web-based training, TSI provides safety training to more than 25,000 people each year.  TSI has courses for all modes of travel, covering the transport of either people or material.  

It is our goal to provide the most up to date training possible, using the latest materials, concepts, technologies and instructional infrastructure available.  In doing so, TSI provides an invaluable service to the world’s transportation system, making it safer for all that utilize it.

I am extremely proud to be associated with my colleagues at TSI, I invite you to join us by utilizing the state of the art training we can make available to you.  Our course completion certificates carry the U.S. Department of Transportation seal and for over 40 years TSI has provided the best in transportation safety training to professionals both in and out of government.  I look forward to having you share in the TSI experience.  

 

Transportation Saftey Institute (TSI) Logo

Source Article

May
5

Analysis on Impact of Covid-19- Automotive Cross Car Beam Market 2019-2023 | Demand for Enhanced Safety to Boost Growth | Technavio

LONDON–(BUSINESS WIRE)–Technavio has been monitoring the automotive cross car beam market and it is poised to grow by USD 507.06 million during 2019-2023, progressing at a CAGR of about 4% during the forecast period. The report offers an up-to-date analysis regarding the current market scenario, latest trends and drivers, and the overall market environment.

Technavio suggests three forecast scenarios (optimistic, probable, and pessimistic) considering the impact of COVID-19. Please Request Latest Free Sample Report on COVID-19 Impact

The market is fragmented, and the degree of fragmentation will accelerate during the forecast period. CIE Automotive SA, DURA Automotive Systems LLC, ElringKlinger AG, Faurecia SA, Georg Fischer Ltd., KIRCHHOFF Automotive GmbH, Meridian Lightweight Technologies Inc., Multimatic Inc, Shiloh Industries Inc., Unipres Corp. are some of the major market participants. The demand for enhanced safety will offer immense growth opportunities. To make the most of the opportunities, market vendors should focus more on the growth prospects in the fast-growing segments, while maintaining their positions in the slow-growing segments.

Demand for enhanced safety has been instrumental in driving the growth of the market.

Automotive Cross Car Beam Market 2019-2023: Segmentation

Automotive Cross Car Beam Market is segmented as below:

  • Type
  • Geographic Landscape
    • APAC
    • Europe
    • MEA
    • North America
    • South America

To learn more about the global trends impacting the future of market research, download latest free sample report of 2020-2024: https://www.technavio.com/talk-to-us?report=IRTNTR32134

Automotive Cross Car Beam Market 2019-2023: Scope

Technavio presents a detailed picture of the market by the way of study, synthesis, and summation of data from multiple sources. Our automotive cross car beam market report covers the following areas:

  • Automotive Cross Car Beam Market Size
  • Automotive Cross Car Beam Market Trends
  • Automotive Cross Car Beam Market Industry Analysis

This study identifies shift in vendor preference towards using alternative raw materials and product designs as one of the prime reasons driving the automotive cross car beam market growth during the next few years.

Automotive Cross Car Beam Market 2019-2023: Vendor Analysis

We provide a detailed analysis of vendors operating in the automotive cross car beam market, including some of the vendors such as CIE Automotive SA, DURA Automotive Systems LLC, ElringKlinger AG, Faurecia SA, Georg Fischer Ltd., KIRCHHOFF Automotive GmbH, Meridian Lightweight Technologies Inc., Multimatic Inc, Shiloh Industries Inc., Unipres Corp. Backed with competitive intelligence and benchmarking, our research reports on the automotive cross car beam market are designed to provide entry support, customer profile and M&As as well as go-to-market strategy support.

Register for a free trial today and gain instant access to 17,000+ market research reports.

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Automotive Cross Car Beam Market 2019-2023: Key Highlights

  • CAGR of the market during the forecast period 2019-2023
  • Detailed information on factors that will assist automotive cross car beam market growth during the next five years
  • Estimation of the automotive cross car beam market size and its contribution to the parent market
  • Predictions on upcoming trends and changes in consumer behavior
  • The growth of the automotive cross car beam market
  • Analysis of the
May
3

Bicycle road rules and safety | Transport and motoring

Print


Bicycles are a type of vehicle—when you ride a bicycle on a Queensland road, you have rights and responsibilities like all other road users.

When you ride a bicycle, you must obey the general road rules the same as other motorists as well as the specific road rules for bicycle riders.

Riding a bicycle

When you ride a bicycle, you must:

  • have 1 leg on each side of the seat
  • face forwards
  • keep at least 1 hand on the handlebars.

Carrying people

You can carry another person if:

  • the bicycle is designed to carry more than 1 person and has a passenger seat
  • each person is wearing a helmet.

Signalling

You must use a hand signal when you turn right. To do this, extend your right arm out horizontally—at a right angle from the right side of the bicycle. Your hand should be open, with your palm facing forward.

Towing with a bicycle

You must not:

  • ride a bicycle that is being towed by another vehicle
  • hold on to a moving vehicle while riding a bicycle
  • lead an animal while riding a bicycle.

Riding with a person in a bicycle trailer

You can tow a child in or on a bicycle trailer if:

  • you are 16 years or older
  • the child is under 10 years old and is wearing an approved helmet that is securely fitted and fastened
  • the bicycle trailer can safely carry the child.

Riding too close to a vehicle

You must keep at least 2m between you and the back of a vehicle when you follow that vehicle for over 200m.

Being a traffic hazard

You must avoid being a traffic hazard—do not ride into the path of a driver or pedestrian.

Keeping left and overtaking

When you ride, you must:

  • ride as close as possible to the left side (or on the road shoulder) on a single lane road. Or, you may take up any position within the lane on a multi-lane road
  • ride to the left of any oncoming vehicle
  • not overtake another vehicle on the left if that vehicle is indicating and turning left
  • not overtake another vehicle on the left if it is not safe
  • not ride with more than 2 riders side by side unless you are overtaking another rider
  • ride no more than 1.5m apart, if travelling beside another rider.

Bicycle helmets

When you ride a bicycle or an electric powered wheeled recreational device or a personal mobility device like a rideable, you must wear an Australian Standard (AS) approved bicycle helmet. You must securely fit and fasten it. An approved bicycle helmet means a helmet that complies with AS 2063 or AS/NZS 2063.

You may only carry passengers on your bicycle if the bicycle is designed to carry passengers. If you carry a passenger on your bicycle, they must also wear an approved helmet, securely fitted and fastened. However, if they are a paying passenger on a 3 or 4 wheeled bicycle, they do not have to wear a

May
2

Department of Transportation | HDOT COVID-19 update: Identification credentials, safety checks, and vehicle registrations

HDOT COVID-19 update: Identification credentials, safety checks, and vehicle registrations

Posted on Apr 30, 2020 in Highways News, Main, News

HONOLULU – In consideration of Governor Ige’s 6th supplementary emergency proclamation through May 31, 2020, the Hawaii Department of Transportation (HDOT) provides the following updates on identification credentials, Periodic Motor Vehicle Inspections (PMVI or Safety Checks), and motor vehicle registrations.

Identification Credentials (Driver’s Licenses, State Identification Cards)

  • Driver’s licenses, instruction permits, and State Identification cards that expire between March 15 and May 31, 2020, are granted a 90-day waiver. All State-issued credentials expiring during this date range will be considered valid for an additional 90-days from the end of Governor Ige’s 6th supplementary emergency proclamation on May 31, 2020. This extension is to provide enough time for the public to obtain or renew credentials once face-to-face government services are reopened.
  • Commercial Driver’s License (CDL) holders with a CDL that expired between March 16, 2020 thru May 31, 2020, are allowed an extension of up to 90-days but the 90 days cannot go past June 30, 2020. The Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) has set June 30, 2020, as the last date that an extension may be granted. Please review HDOT’s frequently asked questions section at https://hidot.hawaii.gov/highways/faq/covid-19-cdl-faqs/
  • As previously announced by the Transportation Security Administration (TSA), expired driver’s licenses or State IDs that expired on or after March 1 can be used at TSA checkpoints. HDOT has also sent memorandum to the county police departments informing them of the previous expiration extension and will update this memo to minimize potential misunderstandings.

Safety Checks (PMVI)

  • Safety check certificates and stickers expiring on or before May 31, 2020, will remain valid until August 31, 2020. All other safety checks that expire in 2020 will be valid for an additional 3 months after the 2020 expiration date. Please review HDOT’s frequently asked questions section https://hidot.hawaii.gov/highways/faq/covid-19-safety-check-faqs/
  • After careful consideration and discussion with Governor Ige and the Counties, HDOT is extending the safety check waiver to minimize unnecessary face-to-face interactions and to provide enough time for PMVI stations, Counties, and the public to conduct and process safety checks once the stay-at-home order ends. HDOT fully supports the continued opening of stations for vehicle maintenance and repair, as these actions are critical to keep essential travel moving.
  • The safety check extension does not impact the validity of the motor vehicle registration. The motor vehicle registration must still be unexpired to be valid.

Motor Vehicle Registrations

  • Motor vehicle registrations are still being conducted by the Counties, see below for information by County:

City and County of Honolulu – Offers renewals by mail, by DMV NOW kiosks, and online.

County of Maui – Offers renewals by mail and online.

County of Hawaii – Offers renewals by mail, kiosks, and online.

County of Kauai – Offers renewals by mail and online.

  • Motor vehicle registration fees and any applicable penalty fees for late registration have not changed. These funds are necessary to meet the local share of upcoming stimulus projects
May
2

Bicycle Safety – Riding Tips

The Fundamentals – Hand Signals – Hazard Recognition – Tips to Avoid Collisions

Even if you are an experienced cyclist, it’s a good idea to review the fundamentals periodically. You may also want to review them with younger cyclists in your family.

The best guideline is:          Be Alert. Be Wary. Be Seen.

            Be Alert                     Scan ahead, center, left and right.

            Be Wary                    Pay attention to vehicles, pedestrians and others on the road.

            Be Seen                    Use your horn, hand signals and light to be seen by others on the road.

 

 

10 Tips for Safer Cycling

  • Wear your helmet. Follow this simple rule and you reduce your risk of serious injury by as much as 85 percent.
  • Keep your head up and look ahead, not at the ground. You need to see what is coming up so you have time  to react and maneuver.
  • One person per bike. Riding with unsecured passengers puts you at risk for injury to yourself and others.
  • Ride in single file with space between bikes.
  • Ride on the right side of the road, never against traffic. Otherwise, you are at risk for an accident – or a ticket.
  • Plan ahead if you will ride in a group. Agree on the route ahead of time. Have a plan on what you will do if separated by traffic.
  • If you will be riding in an unfamiliar area, check out local laws and rules first.
  • Avoid busy roads and peak traffic times on your route.
  • Before riding at night, ask someone to help you check your visibility to motorists.
  • Maintain the bikes in your household. Keep chains clean and lubricated and periodically inspect brake pads.

Communicate your intention to turn, stop, and change lanes using recognized hand signals.

What is a Hazard?
Both road and weather conditions can be dangerous to riders. Identifying potential hazards and paying attention to your surroundings will keep you safer.

Hazards on the road

  • Uneven, rough surfaces can cause falls.
  • An object in the road can cause a flat tire, loss of balance or unsafe maneuver. Avoid riding across unknown objects.
  • Slippery surfaces create a loss of traction which may cause you to lose control of your bike. Slow down or walk your bike across slippery surfaces.

Make safe choices

  • Do not wear headphones while riding.
  • Keep both hands on the handlebars, except when signaling.
  • Keep both feet on pedals.
  • In a group, ride single-file, with the flow of traffic.
  • Wear a brightly colored helmet and retro-reflective material on your clothing.
  • Use the correct hand signals.
  • Before entering a roadway: Stop. Look left. Look right. Look left.

Avoid riding at twilight or in the dark, especially on narrow roads and roads with speed limits that exceed 35 mph.

Source Article

Apr
30

Motor Vehicle Defects and Safety Recalls: What Every Vehicle Owner Should Know | Safercar.gov

Defects and Recalls Booklet
Download PDF Version

Introduction

In 2009, approximately 30,000 lives were lost on our Nation’s highways Although 30,000 reflect a 28% decrease in traffic fatalities since 2006, much can still be done to address this issue on our Nation’s highways Traffic crashes are the primary cause of debilitating injuries in the United States and the number one killer of Americans under the age of 34 In addition to staggering emotional costs, the annual economic loss to society because of these crashes, in terms of worker productivity, medical costs, insurance costs, etc , is estimated at more than $230 billion Clearly, there is a need for dramatic improvement in motor vehicle safety Getting unsafe vehicles off the road is integral to improving safety and saving lives.

The National Traffic and Motor Vehicle Safety Act (originally enacted in 1966 and now recodified as 49 U.S.C. Chapter 301) gives the Department of Transportation’s National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) the authority to issue vehicle safety standards and to require manufacturers to recall vehicles that have safety-related defects or do not meet Federal safety standards. Since then, more than 390 million cars, trucks, buses, recreational vehicles, motorcycles, and mopeds, as well as 46 million tires, 66 million pieces of motor vehicle equipment, and 42 million child safety seats have been recalled to correct safety defects.

Manufacturers voluntarily initiate many of these recalls, while others are either influenced by NHTSA investigations or ordered by NHTSA via the courts. If a safety defect is discovered, the manufacturer must notify NHTSA, as well as vehicle or equipment owners, dealers, and distributors. The manufacturer is then required to remedy the problem at no charge to the owner. NHTSA is responsible for monitoring the manufacturer’s corrective action to ensure successful completion of the recall campaign.

Purpose

The purpose of this Motor Vehicle Safety Defects and Recalls Booklet is to answer the most commonly asked questions about how and why recall campaigns are initiated, and to inform consumers of their rights and responsibilities when a vehicle or item of motor vehicle equipment is recalled. In these pages, you’ll discover how to report a safety-related problem to NHTSA, as well as how participation by citizens like you helps to keep motor vehicles as safe as possible. See the following section for comprehensive answers to some of the most frequently asked questions (FAQs) NHTSA receives on recalls.

Frequently Asked Questions

When is a recall necessary?

  • When a motor vehicle or item of motor vehicle equipment (including tires) does not comply with a Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standard.

  • When there is a safety-related defect in the vehicle or equipment.

Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standards set minimum performance requirements for those parts of the vehicle that most affect its safe operation (brakes, tires, lighting) or that protect drivers and passengers from death or serious injury in the event of a crash (air bags, safety belts, child restraints, energy absorbing steering columns, motorcycle helmets). These Federal Standards are applicable to all vehicles and

Apr
21

Bicycle Safety | Motor Vehicle Safety

Photo of a biker wearing jeans riding a bicycle.

How big is the problem?

Deaths and Injuries

In 2015 in the United States, over 1,000 bicyclists died and there were almost 467,000 bicycle-related injuries.3

Cost

Data from 2010 show fatal and non-fatal crash-related injuries to bicyclists resulted in lifetime medical costs and productivity losses of $10 billion.3

What are the major risk factors?

  • Adults aged 50 to 59 years have the highest bicycle death rates.3
  • Children (5-14 years) and adolescents (15-19 years) have the highest rates of nonfatal bicycle-related injuries, accounting for more than one-third of all bicycle-related injuries seen in U.S. emergency departments.3
  • Males die 6 times more often and are injured 4 times more often on bicycles than females.3
  • Most bicyclist deaths occur in urban areas and at non-intersection locations.4
  • Among bicyclist deaths, 37% had alcohol involvement either for the motor vehicle driver or bicycle rider.4

How can bicycle-related injuries and deaths be prevented?

Effective Interventions

Effective interventions to reduce injuries and fatalities to bicyclists include the following:

Bicycle helmets

Bicycle helmets reduce the risk of head and brain injuries in the event of a crash.5 All bicyclists, regardless of age, can help protect themselves by wearing properly fitted bicycle helmets every time they ride.

Bicycle helmet laws 

Bicycle helmet laws are effective for increasing helmet use and reducing crash-related injuries and deaths among children and adults.6

Promising Interventions

Interventions that have shown promise for reducing injuries and fatalities to bicyclists include the following:

Active lighting and rider visibility
  • Fluorescent clothing can make bicyclists visible from further away than regular clothing during the daytime.6
  • Retro-reflective clothing can make bicyclists more visible at night.6
  • Active lighting can include front white lights, rear red lights, or other lighting on the bicycle or bicyclist. This lighting may improve the visibility of bicyclists.6
Roadway engineering measures

Information about roadway engineering measures, like bike lanes, that can improve safety for bicyclists is available from The Pedestrian and Bicycle Information CenterExternal.

Source Article

Apr
11

Car Seat.Org – Carseat, Automobile & Child Passenger Safety Community Forums

Source Article

Apr
10

WC Transportation Safety

Motor vehicle transportation, whether in private, public, or school-bus
vehicles, is vital in today’s society. Ready access to transportation is not
only essential for most occupations and education, but also for accessing
healthcare providers, religious services, recreation and leisure activities, shopping, voting, and many other community activities and services. As reported
by the National Council on Disability, the need for transportation is even
greater for individuals who use wheelchairs, including those who are unable
to transfer out of their wheelchair when traveling (Bureau of Transportation
Statistics, 2002; National Council on Disability, 2005). 

In situations where
the wheelchair must function as a motor-vehicle seat, serious concerns arise. 
Transportation safety and occupant crash-protection studies have shown that
a motor vehicle seat is an important part of an occupant-protection system. 

For this reason, wheelchairs that are used as motor vehicle seats must also be designed for this purpose. Wheelchairs prescribed for individuals with the inability to transfer
and which will serve as passenger seats in motor
vehicles should: 

  • demonstrate that they can be effectively secured and provide occupant support
    under the same frontal-impact conditions used to test
    occupant-restraint systems and seats in passenger cars,
    and child safety seats used by children; 
  • facilitate the
    proper placement of vehicle-anchored belt restraints;
    and 
  • have design features that reduce user error
    in securing the wheelchair by four-point, strap-type
    tiedowns. When seating systems from a second manufacturer are needed, the seating system (i.e., seat, back
    support, and attachment hardware) should also demonstrate the ability to provide effective occupant support
    during frontal crashes and should not interfere with
    proper use of belt restraints. 


Easy-to-understand educational/training
materials for distribution to vehicle modifiers and their clients can now be found here. These materials outline best practices
to be used when installing adaptive equipment for drivers and passengers seated in
wheelchairs when riding in private vehicles, as well as best practices in the proper use of
WTORS.  There are also
 Safety Tip Sheets being
developed for other WTS stakeholder groups, such as wheelchair and WTORS manufacturers,
wheelchair prescribers, clinicians, certified driver trainers, rehabilitation tech suppliers, and
transit providers.   Please feel free to provide feedback regarding these tip sheets!

Source Article

Apr
4

Bicycle Safety

Bicycle Safety Introduction

Bicycling is a common means of transportation as well as an increasingly popular source of recreation, exercise, and sport. With more than 100 million bicycle owners, the popularity of bicycling has reached an all-time high.

Along with increased use of bicycles comes the risk of significant injuries. According to national statistics, more than 1.8 billion bicycle outings occur each year, resulting in nearly 494,000 visits to emergency departments. Injuries related to bicycling range from common abrasions, cuts, and bruises to broken bones, internal injuries, head trauma, and even death.

More than 900 bicyclists die annually, and 20,000 are admitted to hospitals. From a statistical standpoint, bicycle riding has a higher death rate per trip or per mile of travel than being a passenger in an automobile. The majority of bicycle deaths are caused by head injuries.

The most common cause of bicycle crashes are falls or collisions with stationary objects.


Principles of Bicycle Safety

 

The best preparation for safe bicycle riding is proper training. Common resources for training include an experienced rider, parent, or community program. Often, however, initial training involves simple instruction from parents on balance and pedaling.

Proper supervision of younger riders is a must . In fact, it is recommended that younger children ride only in enclosed areas.

Early investment in safety equipment such as protective clothing and a helmet can prevent a significant number of injuries. Proper equipment safety preparation include:

  • Helmets – Extremely important
  • Reflective clothing for nighttime or low-visibility conditions
  • Bicycle safety equipment (reflectors on frame and wheels)
  • Proper bicycle selection
  • Proper bicycle maintenance

Consider these ideas to help further reduce the risk of a bicycle accident.

  • A bicycle should only be used in a way that’s appropriate for the age of the rider.
  • A bicycle rider needs to have the proper experience and skill before riding on public roads.
  • Less experienced bicyclists should learn the rules of the road.
  • Both bicyclists and motorists need to understand how to safely and courteously share the road.
  • Both motorist and bicyclist need to observe the proper speed limits, yield right-of-way, not drive while drinking.
  • Bicyclists need to be aware of their surroundings. Watch for opening car doors, sewer grating, debris on the roads, uneven surfaces, and poorly lit areas.

Continued

Obeying traffic rules can help ensure safe travel.

  • Cyclists need to follow the same rules as motorists.
  • Always use correct hand signals before turning.
  • Ride in single file with traffic, not against it.

Use these guidelines to increase cycling safety:

  • Avoid major roads and sidewalks.
  • Announce your presence (“On your left”) on bike and walking trails as you come up behind and pass pedestrians and other riders.

Enforcement and legislation can increase bicycle safety. Promote safety by supporting:

  • The mandated use of protective devices (helmets, reflectors)
  • Bicycle-friendly community and community planning, for