August 01, 2021
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Biden wants U.S automakers to pledge 40% electric vehicles by 2030 -sources
N.Y.’s Transit System Could Receive $10 Billion in Infrastructure Deal
2022 Subaru BRZ Starts Just Under $29,000
Review: The best bicycle tyre inflators to use with an air compressor
Ex-Toyota Europe CEO van Zyl dies at age 63
CPS transportation exec on leave after contentious busing plan rollout
Here’s How To Import A Japanese Car To America Without Hassle
Sonic Automotive ponders EchoPark future
How to Get a Bear Out of Your Car – Videos from The Weather Channel
Towing company agrees to pay troops for illegally selling their vehicles
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Biden wants U.S automakers to pledge 40% electric vehicles by 2030 -sources N.Y.’s Transit System Could Receive $10 Billion in Infrastructure Deal 2022 Subaru BRZ Starts Just Under $29,000 Review: The best bicycle tyre inflators to use with an air compressor Ex-Toyota Europe CEO van Zyl dies at age 63 CPS transportation exec on leave after contentious busing plan rollout Here’s How To Import A Japanese Car To America Without Hassle Sonic Automotive ponders EchoPark future How to Get a Bear Out of Your Car – Videos from The Weather Channel Towing company agrees to pay troops for illegally selling their vehicles
Jul
2021
5

Lynk & Co will make you rethink outdated ideas of car ownership

“This is not a car, this is different” is how Lynk & Co, a company spawned by Volvo and Geely, is positioning the launch of its 01 plug-in hybrid, a compact SUV built from the ground up to share. The more you share its digital key the less you pay each month, possibly even turning a profit.

It’s a bold experiment that I was able to preview in a test vehicle in Amsterdam, where Lynk & Co is staging its first salvo against a century of car ownership mentality.

Lynk & Co first announced its ambitious approach to car sharing five years ago in its home city of Gothenburg, Sweden, emboldened by studies that say cars sit unused 96 percent of the time. That’s valuable real estate that could otherwise be returned to people. So it’s with some anticipation that I set out for my week with a production 01 PHEV running pre-production sharing software.

A VW Up from Geenwheels next to the Lynk & Co 01 PHEV in Amsterdam.

Amsterdam was chosen as Lynk & Co’s launch city for a variety of reasons, chief among them is its multi-modal inhabitants’ intimacy with car-sharing services. My Dutch family, for example, has never owned a car, nor do most of my friends. Instead we use fleet sharing services like Greenwheels, Mywheels, or Share Now. Otherwise we use a personal car-sharing service like Snappcar when looking for something more interesting to drive. As much as we love our electric bicycles, a car is often needed when an e-scooter, taxi, bus, or train just won’t do.

After a week of testing I’ve come away increasingly optimistic about Lynk & Co’s chances, not only to achieve its revenue goals but also its broader societal goal of making people realize that traditional ideas of car ownership, especially in densely populated cities, are woefully outdated. My optimism is fueled by three things: the company’s early success in attracting members, driving the 01 for a few hundred kilometers, and testing an early beta version of the sharing service.

Memberships are off to an aggressive start.

A PROMISING START

You can buy a Lynk & Co 01 outright for €39,000, but most people are opting for memberships that cost €500 each month. That’s about what you’d pay each month on a four-year lease for a comparable Volvo XC40 which is built upon the same platform as the 01. Only with Lynk & Co you can cancel the agreement at any time. Better yet, you can divide the monthly fee with family and friends, or reduce it further by lending the car out to a general pool of neighbors and tourists at an hourly or daily rate, all of which Lynk & Co will facilitate (more on that later).

Membership includes 1,250km (777 miles) of driving per month with each extra kilometer costing €0.15, and unused kilometers carrying over to the next month. The €500/month fee covers insurance, warranty repairs, roadside assistance, and maintenance by Volvo’s dealer

May
2020
8

The Coronavirus Pandemic Is Forcing Cities To Rethink Public Transportation

As parts of Europe and the United States begin to lift coronavirus lockdown restrictions and allow people to go shopping, visit relatives and return to work, public officials are facing a new conundrum: How can people travel safely in crowded cities?

Italy is poised to serve as a major test case. On Sunday, Prime Minister Giuseppe Conte announced that many restrictions on daily life will be eased starting next Monday, but he warned that people would still need to avoid large gatherings, maintain social distancing and wear masks in certain circumstances.

“If we do not respect the precautions, the curve will go up, the deaths will increase and we will have irreversible damage to our economy,” Conte said in a televised address to the nation. “If you love Italy, keep your distance.”

People walk to the San Giovanni metro station in Rome on April 24 during a three-hour testing period of new measures designed



People walk to the San Giovanni metro station in Rome on April 24 during a three-hour testing period of new measures designed to reduce congestion on public transportation, April 24.

Some 2.7 million Italians are expected to return to work next week, with 15% of them anticipated to use public transportation, according to Italian authorities.

Thus, government officials and business leaders are scrambling to develop protocols to allow people to move about freely without triggering a surge in coronavirus infections.

Under new guidelines that are being considered, the number of people allowed on buses and trains is likely to be restricted. Markers will be placed on the ground in metro stations to enforce social distancing, and camera systems and personnel will be deployed to help count passengers and prevent overcrowding, according to HuffPost Italy.

Italy’s transport ministry has suggested that electronic ticket machines will likely become standard, with hand sanitizer dispensers installed nearby. Trains and buses will be disinfected regularly, and the way passengers board and exit vehicles and stations will be adjusted. Moreover, a key goal of any plan will be to spread out daily commuters in order to reduce congestion.

Already, new measures are being tested in Rome. During a three-hour testing period on Friday, only 30 passengers were allowed into stations every three minutes at two of the city’s metro lines, and the number of passengers on each train was capped at 150, HuffPost Italy reported. On the train platforms, blue stripes with small dots indicated how far apart passengers needed to stand. Passages connecting the two lines were closed to prevent people from crossing each other and creating crowds.

A man rides a bicycle on an empty Corso Garibaldi, a main road in the center of Milan, on February 26. In response to th



A man rides a bicycle on an empty Corso Garibaldi, a main road in the center of Milan, on February 26. In response to the coronavirus pandemic, the city plans to increase bike lanes and pedestrian paths and discourage car use.

In addition, many cities are hoping to encourage people to use alternate forms of transportation. Bologna has requested support from the federal government for the purchase of e-bikes and electric scooters, for example, and Milan has unveiled an ambitious plan to remake