September 19, 2021
11 11 11 AM
Rekor Systems Announces Selection of Waycare Technologies by Louisiana Department of Transportation and Development for Pilot Program to Reduce State Traffic Congestion and Crashes
California homeless camp fire damages 2 bridges, disrupts public transportation
Austin finishes half of its bicycle network, expects to complete entire 400-mile system by 2025
The Top 10 Automotive Concepts that automotive enthusiasts will be itching to see on the road!
Oregon Transportation Commission, wary of I-5 Rose Quarter project’s growing price tag, grants conditional approval
Woman dies after being hit by car in North Windham Friday night
Silk-FAW Continues To Poach Italy’s Automotive Talent, As Lamborghini’s Katia Bassi Joins As Managing Director
Transportation Department cracks down on airlines withholding refunds for canceled flights
Bear gets trapped in car, destroys interior
Cycling apparel company adding full-service bike repair to visitor center
Latest Post
Rekor Systems Announces Selection of Waycare Technologies by Louisiana Department of Transportation and Development for Pilot Program to Reduce State Traffic Congestion and Crashes California homeless camp fire damages 2 bridges, disrupts public transportation Austin finishes half of its bicycle network, expects to complete entire 400-mile system by 2025 The Top 10 Automotive Concepts that automotive enthusiasts will be itching to see on the road! Oregon Transportation Commission, wary of I-5 Rose Quarter project’s growing price tag, grants conditional approval Woman dies after being hit by car in North Windham Friday night Silk-FAW Continues To Poach Italy’s Automotive Talent, As Lamborghini’s Katia Bassi Joins As Managing Director Transportation Department cracks down on airlines withholding refunds for canceled flights Bear gets trapped in car, destroys interior Cycling apparel company adding full-service bike repair to visitor center
Sep
2021
6

Ozarks Transportation Organization asks for input for its Destination 2045 plan

SPRINGFIELD, Mo. (KY3) – Ozarks Transportation Organization (OTO), the Springfield-area Metropolitan Planning Organization (MPO), is taking public comment through September 15 for Destination 2045, the region’s long range transportation plan.

READ DRAFT PLAN: https://media.ozarkstransportation.org/documents/DraftDestination2045_08122021.pdf

Destination 2045 is the five-year update to the Ozarks Transportation Organization’s Long Range Transportation Plan. This plan looks to 2045 to determine transportation needs and priorities throughout the region. Solidified with public input, the OTO looks forward to implementing this plan during the five years until the next update.

Online Public Meetings:

OTO is hosting an online public meeting throughout the public involvement period. The public is invited to evaluate the plan recommendations, review background information and maps, and provide feedback through a quick survey. Join the meeting here: https://www.ozarkstransportation.org/what-we-do/destination2045.

A live public meeting will be held online Tuesday, August 31 from 4:30 p.m. to 6:30 p.m. OTO staff will be available to answer questions the public may have regarding the Plan and its recommendations. The public may join via Zoom: https://us02web.zoom.us/j/88991939024 or watch through Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/ozarkstransportationorganization.

Drafts of the Plan are available for review: · GiveUsYourInput.org (http://giveusyourinput.org/)

· City Utilities Transit Center, 211 N. Main, Springfield

· Springfield-Greene County Library Center, 4653 South Campbell, Springfield

· Springfield-Greene County Library Station, 2535 N. Kansas Expy, Springfield

· Christian County Library Nixa Branch, 208 N. McCroskey, Nixa

· Christian County Library Ozark Branch, 1005 N. 4th Ave, Ozark

· MoDOT Southwest District Office, 3025 E. Kearney, Springfield

· OTO offices at 2208 W. Chesterfield Blvd., Suite 101, Springfield

Comments can be submitted via: • Online at GiveUsYourInput.org (http://giveusyourinput.org/) • Email at comment@ozarkstransportation.org

• Mail at 2208 W. Chesterfield Blvd., Suite 101, Springfield, MO 65807

To report a correction or typo, please email digitalnews@ky3.com

Copyright 2021 KY3. All rights reserved.

Jul
2021
31

CPS transportation exec on leave after contentious busing plan rollout

Cincinnati Public Schools’  director of pupil transportation has been placed on administrative leave following the controversial rollout of a new busing plan for students.

In a statement to The Enquirer on Thursday, the district said a human resources investigation is underway.

“A Director-level CPS employee was making decisions without involvement of senior administration or the board, as well as misrepresenting discussions with SORTA,” the Southwest Ohio Regional Transit Authority, the statement said.

The Enquirer verified with district officials that the employee is Loren Johnson, who leads the district’s transportation department.

What happened at SORTA’s board meeting?

On Tuesday, SORTA announced during a special board meeting that specific Metro bus routes for students would be eliminated and the students in grades 7-12 who use those routes will be given regular bus passes.

The routes, dubbed XTRA routes, were designed to provide students with non-stop service to school. Cincinnati Public Schools pays for the service, but these routes have always been open to the public, as federal law prohibits agencies like SORTA from offering private service.

SORTA touted the plan as an improvement to service after missing an average of 300 rides a month this spring on these routes. With a recently passed transportation levy, SORTA said it has expanded its services and students will have more reliable and flexible service under the new plans.

SORTA officials also said this plan was developed in conjunction with Cincinnati Public Schools. But on Wednesday, the school board and superintendent said they opposed the plan and wanted the routes reinstated.

In an effort to untangle what happened, The Enquirer obtained a batch of emails through a public records request to SORTA that show how the plan came together.

The emails show there was a plan for a joint press release about the busing changes planned for July 21, but the school district abandoned that plan after a fact-finding session with the school board July 19.

“The elimination of XTRA routes was positioned to CPS leadership as non-negotiable and the result of a staffing shortage,” the district said in a statement to The Enquirer. “At no time was this perceived by CPS leadership as a positive change for our students or as something we had the ability to influence. Rather, it was a challenging situation that we were prepared to help our families navigate.”

Emails show how the busing plan developed

A Metro bus makes its way up Burnet Avenue.

So how did this plan come to be?

Emails show that SORTA was in extensive conversations with Johnson. SORTA spokeswoman Brandy Jones said Johnson was “enthusiastic” about the changes.

The emails show months of back-and-forth over students being abandoned on the dedicated routes with no way to get to school. Johnson even told SORTA in May a solution was necessary before the media caught wind of the problem.

The new busing plan started taking shape July 1.

That day, SORTA’s CEO, Darryl Haley, had emailed Johnson to say he had “a crazy idea” he wanted to run past him over the phone.

Later that

Jul
2021
19

Port Authority of Allegheny County releases NEXTransit plan

The Port Authority of Allegheny County has released their plan to make the Pittsburgh region more accessible, and one idea includes an aerial tram system in the Strip District.The agency’s long-range plan includes 18 projects that they said would improve transit in our area.Rich Wagner of Carrick is a frequent rider of the T.”It’s not too bad from where I park at to here,” he said. “It’s only about a 20 minute ride.”Same for Richard DiBella of Mt. Lebanon. He takes a 20 minute light rail ride into the city, daily.”I think there are a lot of other areas in town that could use the support of either busing or T other than the South Hills where I reside,” he said.That’s exactly what the Port Authority of Allegheny County has been working on over the past two years, and with a lot of public input. It’s called “Next Transit” and is a 25-year plan to improve transit in our area.The most requested infrastructure includes extending the T to the airport and adding a T line from downtown Pittsburgh to Oakland. The plan would also create a downtown transit center, a rapid transit link through the Parkway East and Allegheny Valley South Bank corridor, and bus lanes along McKnight Road in the North Hills.But a high priority on the list of projects, and an attractive one, is an aerial tram system that would connect the Hill District to the Strip District.”I think we should have one there and Mt. Washington, to be honest with you,” said DiBella. “I don’t know why they’ve never had one from Mt. Washington over to the city. It would be fantastic.”The cost for all of these projects is anywhere from $3-4 billion.The Port Authority is holding four public meetings on the plan starting on Wednesday, July 21.To read the details on the 80-page plan: https://drive.google.com/file/d/1T5XL4LbdsCqCWK2EJElLYLun9IprS20q/view

The Port Authority of Allegheny County has released their plan to make the Pittsburgh region more accessible, and one idea includes an aerial tram system in the Strip District.

The agency’s long-range plan includes 18 projects that they said would improve transit in our area.

Rich Wagner of Carrick is a frequent rider of the T.

“It’s not too bad from where I park at to here,” he said. “It’s only about a 20 minute ride.”

Same for Richard DiBella of Mt. Lebanon. He takes a 20 minute light rail ride into the city, daily.

“I think there are a lot of other areas in town that could use the support of either busing or T other than the South Hills where I reside,” he said.

That’s exactly what the Port Authority of Allegheny County has been working on over the past two years, and with a lot of public input. It’s called “Next Transit” and is a 25-year plan to improve transit in our area.

The most requested infrastructure includes extending the T to the airport and adding a T line from downtown Pittsburgh to Oakland. The plan

Jul
2021
17

More than 80% of a 20-year Richmond region transportation plan is dedicated for highway projects. Some want that changed. | Richmond Local News

Jimmy Chen, a professor and program chair of the Virginia Commonwealth University Urban and Regional Studies and Planning program who attended ConnectRVA 2045 public meetings this summer, said the Richmond region is car dependent due to many people traveling for work, as well as the lack of other reliable travel options.

“You cannot rely on the [Greater Richmond Transit Company] bus to get 100% access to destinations,” Chen said. “Right now the population is so dispersed .. and job and housing is unbalanced.” 

Chen said while driving provides “unprecedented mobility” for travel, it emits more pollutants than other modes of transportation, so it is important to eliminate unnecessary car trips and support sustainable travel.

“[The plan] mainly focused on supply side, how do we improve the intersection, how do we widen freeways,” Chen said. “but we also need to make sure that travel demand should be reduced … we need to encourage more transit-oriented development.”

However, Chen said it’s an overall great plan, adding the plan is not permanent and will be adjusted in the coming years — the plan is updated every four years.

“This blueprint is great,” Chen said. “This year they’ve had a lot of meetings and made a lot of progress.”

The projects list is in a public review and comment period for air quality testing from July 9-24, which examines projects to see their potential for ozone emissions. If a projects emissions are high, the board could reconsider whether toinclude it, Parsons said. 

Jul
2021
5

Cost jumps for Charlotte’s transportation and rail plan

An ambitious transit plan for the Charlotte region will cost more than city leaders estimated earlier this year.

Rail and bus rapid transit projects alone will cost $11.6 billion, a figure nestled on the high range of what a Charlotte advisory group estimated in December: somewhere between $8 billion to $12 billion, split between local and federal funding. Amanda Vandegrift, principal consultant at InfraStrategies LLC, presented an updated financial model to the Charlotte City Council on Monday.

Non-transit costs — for projects including greenways, as well as pedestrian and bicycle networks — could cost $1.9 billion, Vandegrift said.

The total price tag for now, $13.5 billion, is a preliminary assumption that could fluctuate depending on the timeline of individual transportation initiatives, federal funding grants and a controversial countywide tax, among other variables, over an 18-year construction period, she said.

City Manager Marcus Jones assured the Council that the proposed “1 cent for mobility tax” would still cover all projects within the Transformational Mobility Network, including the Red Line and Silver Line.

The countywide tax would begin in 2023, giving a buffer for the region to recover from the coronavirus pandemic, Vandegrift said. Of the $11.6 billion in projected transit costs, about $7 billion would be covered by sales tax revenue, with the rest from federal grants.

The transit tax will require approval from the General Assembly, and Mecklenburg County commissioners would need to approve putting the transit tax referendum on a future ballot.

The City Council did not take action on the tax or other parts of the plan on Monday. But Council member Braxton Winston reminded his colleagues the plan has failed to gain traction in north Mecklenburg, where leaders have adamantly opposed the tax.

Red Line opening date

The LYNX Red Line commuter rail — traversing Davidson, Cornelius, Huntersville and center city Charlotte — has been touted as the hallmark of the interconnected mobility network.

It’s also one the thorniest part of the transit plan. Council member Tariq Bokhari on Monday said Charlotte’s plan was “dead in the water,” after Charlotte broke trust with the surrounding towns and Raleigh in the early planning stages.

North Mecklenburg leaders remain skeptical the transportation plan could benefit their residents, after waiting years to see the Red Line come to fruition. The company that controls rail tracks that’s seen as the best option for the Red Line has not signaled its intent to cooperate with city and county leaders for shared use.

But Vandegrift said the Red Line is expected to open in 2031 and cost $674 million, according to the transportation plan’s financial model.

The LYNX Silver Line would run from Matthews to north of uptown, then westward past the airport and across the Catawba River to Gaston County. The first phase would open in 2037, with the second phase opening in 2040, Vandegrift said.

Other planned openings include:

I-77 bus rapid transit in 2029

CityLNX Gold Line (phase 3) in 2033

LYNX Blue Line extension in 2041

May
2020
12

Santa Barbara – Bicycle Master Plan

The community-driven Santa Barbara Bicycle Master Plan (also referred to as the SB BMP) outlines the goals, policies, and implementation strategies that will improve bicycle safety, convenience, facilities, and infrastructure in the City of Santa Barbara. The plan will also enhance and preserve Santa Barbara’s circulation system for all road users by increasing the number of trips taken by bicycle; reducing future traffic congestion levels and parking demand. The plan implements other General Plan goals and policies such as Healthy Communities and Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Reduction.

Chapter 1:
Introduction

Provides an overview of the Bicycle Master Plan, explains the vision and goals of the project, lists relevant plans and policies, and presents factors that lay the foundation for the development of this Plan such as local context and the existing transportation network.
PDF DocumentDownload PDF

Chapter 2:
Community Engagement

Provides an overview of the outreach completed for the 2016 Bicycle Master Plan, along with a description of the online platforms, surveys, and neighborhood summits. Brief summaries of findings are documented here. For a more extensive summary of all outreach findings, see the document Appendix.
PDF DocumentDownload PDF

Chapter 3:
Goal 1. Safety for All Road Users

Provides policies and strategies to reduce collision rates and provide a comprehensive educational bicycle safety campaign. This goal was influenced directly by the community, which prioritized safety for all road users as the most important goal of the 2016 Bicycle Master Plan.
PDF DocumentDownload PDF

Chapter 4:
Goal 2. Closing Gaps in the Network

Provides policies and strategies to close gaps in the existing bicycle network. The recommendations provided here define specific streets and corridors recommended for an expanded bicycle facility network.
PDF DocumentDownload PDF

Chapter 5:
Goal 3. Complete Streets and Multimodal Access

Provides policies and strategies to encourage multi-modal transfers and connections. This chapter also outlines strategies to coordinate City efforts to enhance streets for all road users: pedestrians, bicyclists, motorists, and transit users.
PDF DocumentDownload PDF

Chapter 6:
Goal 4. Santa Barbara Style Infrastructure

Provides policies and strategies to develop infrastructure based on best practices, with a careful eye towards the Santa Barbara context and design aesthetic.
PDF DocumentDownload PDF

Chapter 7:
Recommended Bicycle Projects

Provides more-specific information on key bike projects that were introduced in Chapter 4. Preliminary design considerations for six recommended bike facilities are also introduced.
PDF DocumentDownload PDF

Chapter 8:
Making it Happen: Financing and Implementation

Provides criteria for prioritizing and costing bicycle facilities recommended in this document. This chapter includes a cost-benefit analysis, and it also refers to regular funding programs that may be available for implementing bicycle facility projects.
PDF DocumentDownload PDF

APPENDICES

Appendix A:
Outreach & Media Strategy
PDF DocumentDownload PDF

Appendix B:
Public Outreach Findings
PDF DocumentDownload PDF

Appendix C:
Traffic Safety and Impact Assessment (Ceqa exemption)
PDF DocumentDownload PDF

Appendix D:
General Plan Element Goals/Policies Consulted
PDF DocumentDownload PDF

Appendix E:
Additional Background Documentation
PDF DocumentDownload PDF

Appendix F:
Bicycle Collision Analysis
PDF DocumentDownload PDF

 

Source Article

May
2020
2

Transportation Master Plan – City of Tacoma

City of Tacoma Transportation Master Plan logoThe Tacoma Transportation Commission and City of Tacoma staff has developed the City’s first Transportation Master Plan (TMP). The Plan was adopted in November 2015 and will help the City and community examine its transportation systems, how well they are functioning and what needs, including funding, will be necessary over the next 20 years and beyond.

 

One of the key mandates of this plan is accommodating expected future growth in Tacoma. Between now and 2040, Tacoma is expected to gain 127,000 residents and 97,000 jobs according to the Puget Sound Regional Council.

 

To set the tone for the Transportation Master Plan, the Transportation Commission established the following future vision for Tacoma, which guides all aspects of the Plan.

 

Vision Statement

Tacoma is a sustainable community with many drivers, residents, businesses and visitors who have various transportation priorities. The City is strategic in how it plans its transportation system with an emphasis on carrying the people and goods that foster Tacoma’s culture, character, and competitiveness. The transportation system offers multimodal travel options that provide safe access for all users and neighborhoods that encourage healthy living and protect the environment. 

 

2018 Amendments to the Transportation Master Plan (adopted June 26, 2018 Ordinance 24686)

 

Modal Maps

Pedestrian Map
Bike Map
Transit Maps
Freight Map
Auto Map

Transportation Commission Meetings

Transportation Commission
Third Wednesday of each month

5:30 PM
747 Market Street, Room 243 (2nd floor)
Tacoma, WA 98402

Feedback

For more information, please send us an email.

Source Article

Apr
2020
1

Metrolinx Regional Transportation Plan

About The 2041 Regional Transportation Plan

Our region is growing quickly, and we must continue the work underway to ensure that people can get to where they need to go, today and in the future.

The 2041 Regional Transportation Plan – the 2041 RTP – is about providing even more people with access to fast, frequent and reliable transit, and making it easier for travellers to use transit, or travel by bike or on foot.

The 2041 RTP guides the continuing transformation of the transportation system in the Greater Toronto and Hamilton Area (GTHA). It is the blueprint for an integrated multimodal regional transportation system that puts the traveller’s needs first.

Everyone has a role to play in making the transportation system work.

Making the 2041 RTP a reality is only possible through collaboration and partnership, and all those who plan, build, maintain, finance and/or operate transportation in the GTHA need to be involved. This includes the 30 regional and local governments in the GTHA, Metrolinx, the Province of Ontario, the federal government, and the transit agencies (including the GO Transit division of Metrolinx). It also means working with municipalities and the private sector to ensure that land uses – such as for housing, offices, condos, hospitals, school campuses and recreational facilities – are designed to focus on the movement of people, not just vehicles.

This plan also encourages:

  • employers to work with us on projects like teleworking and flexible work hours,
  • schools and communities to work with us to reverse the trend of kids getting to school by car,
  • civic organizations to help us make sure that transit is available to those who need it most and,
  • the business community to support the delivery of goods while reducing emissions and conflict with other road users.

Vision, Goals and Strategies to Make it Happen

Developed in partnership with municipal partners and many others, the 2041 RTP builds on the successes of The Big Move (2008), the first regional transportation plan for the GTHA. It presents a vision for the future, and sets out creating strong connections, complete travel experiences, and sustainable and healthy communities as the 2041 RTP’s three goals. To achieve this vision and these three goals, the 2041 RTP outlines five strategies:

  1. Complete the delivery of current regional transit projects
  2. Connect more of the region with frequent rapid transit
  3. Optimize the transportation system
  4. Integrate transportation and land use
  5. Prepare for an uncertain future

Full implementation of the 2041 RTP will lead to an integrated and seamless transportation system for the GTHA. It will improve the traveller experience and offer enhanced transportation choices. It will improve access to reliable and frequent rapid transit, and will make travel more affordable by reducing the need to own a car—and will thereby provide associated social, environmental, health and economic benefits.

Mar
2020
31

Transportation Master Plan

 

The TMP is the guiding policy document for the city of Boulder’s transportation system and is organized around five focus areas:  Complete Streets ,  Regional Travel ,  Transportation Demand Management ,  Funding and  Sustainability   

The 2019 TMP assesses how far the community has come in meeting its mobility and sustainability goals since the last version of the TMP was released in 2014 and establishes transportation policy and investment priorities for the future.


News and Events 

On Sept. 17, 2019, the Boulder City Council approved the 2019 Transportation Master Plan (TMP). The 2019 TMP is the guiding policy document for the city of Boulder’s transportation system and has been significantly revised and reorganized around ten key initiatives. These initiatives represent the work areas that are key to meeting our sustainability, transportation and greenhouse gas reduction targets by 2030.

View the 2019 TMP and appendices:

TMP 2019 Update Community Engagement Summary


Newsletter 

Sign up below for the City of Boulder’s Transportation e-newsletter to receive regular updates on the TMP and community events:

Email Address:

    


Previous Events

Connecting People and Places: Transportation Master Plan Launch

   

On Wednesday, March 21, 2018, the c­ity launch­ed a communi­ty dr­iven update to Boulder’ s Transportati­on Master Plan (TMP) at the Millennium Harvest House. The event included an interactive open house with information boards pdf and featur­ed nat­ional visionaries on sustai­nable transportation, regional mobi­l­ity and emergi­ng technolog­ies. The panel discussion was recorded for those who weren’t able to attend.

Panel speaker bios are provided below, followed by the time in the video to view each speaker’ s presentation:

Jeremy Klop , Director of Strategy at Fehr & Peers, led LA citywide Mobility Plan 2035 – 20 mins 00  Jeremy’ s Slides pdf

Jeffrey Tumlin , principal and director of strategy at NelsonNygaard Consulting Associates, author of Sustainable Transportation: Tools for Creating Healthy, Vibrant and Resilient Communities – 45 mins 45  Jeffrey’ s Slides pdf

Kevin J. Krizek , Professor of Environmental Design and Environmental Studies at the University of Colorado Boulder, Fulbright Scholar and researcher on cycling, co-author of The End of Traffic and the Future of Access: A Roadmap to the New Transport Landscape – 1:09 hour  Kevin’ s Slides pdf

Francie Stefan , Mobility Manager for the City of Santa Monica, leads the citywide Strategic Goal to Create a New Model of Mobility 1:30 hour  Francie’ s Slides pdf

View all speaker presentations as a single  PDF pdf (large file).

Advanced Mobility Forum

On Oct. 18, 2017, the City of Boulder and the Boulder Chamber  sponsored an open house and panel discussion featuring discussions with national practitioners and researchers on the cutting edge of new transportation technologies. This is just the start of the conversation about how advanced mobility will continue to impact how we move around – and how we plan for the future – in Boulder and the region.  Visit the event page to learn about the speakers featured, and be sure to  check out the video!


Transportation Master Plans Open House + Panel Discussion

On Thursday, March 21, the