September 17, 2021
11 11 11 AM
California homeless camp fire damages 2 bridges, disrupts public transportation
Austin finishes half of its bicycle network, expects to complete entire 400-mile system by 2025
The Top 10 Automotive Concepts that automotive enthusiasts will be itching to see on the road!
Oregon Transportation Commission, wary of I-5 Rose Quarter project’s growing price tag, grants conditional approval
Woman dies after being hit by car in North Windham Friday night
Silk-FAW Continues To Poach Italy’s Automotive Talent, As Lamborghini’s Katia Bassi Joins As Managing Director
Transportation Department cracks down on airlines withholding refunds for canceled flights
Bear gets trapped in car, destroys interior
Cycling apparel company adding full-service bike repair to visitor center
German sales plunge in August to lowest level since 1992
Latest Post
California homeless camp fire damages 2 bridges, disrupts public transportation Austin finishes half of its bicycle network, expects to complete entire 400-mile system by 2025 The Top 10 Automotive Concepts that automotive enthusiasts will be itching to see on the road! Oregon Transportation Commission, wary of I-5 Rose Quarter project’s growing price tag, grants conditional approval Woman dies after being hit by car in North Windham Friday night Silk-FAW Continues To Poach Italy’s Automotive Talent, As Lamborghini’s Katia Bassi Joins As Managing Director Transportation Department cracks down on airlines withholding refunds for canceled flights Bear gets trapped in car, destroys interior Cycling apparel company adding full-service bike repair to visitor center German sales plunge in August to lowest level since 1992
Jul
2021
11

Oakland will keep its protected bicycle lanes on Telegraph Avenue

Free Oakland news, written by Oaklanders, delivered straight to your inbox.



Five years ago, Oakland planners broke ground on a bold project on Telegraph Avenue: a protected bicycle lane. It might not seem like that big of a deal until you see it. Most bicycle lanes in Oakland and the rest of California are the buffered type, which place bike riders in a painted strip next to vehicle traffic, with parked cars on their right. Protected lanes entirely separate bicyclists from moving traffic by putting a barrier in between them.

To do this on Telegraph, Department of Transportation staff started by reducing its four-driving lane design to two, with one lane for each direction of vehicle traffic, and a center turn lane. Then they moved car parking about four feet away from the curb and painted stripes designating the space in between parked cars and the sidewalk as the protected bicycle lane. 

Over time, the Department of Transportation, commonly referred to as OakDOT, added other physical barriers like bollards, plastic poles stuck into the ground to better separate the protected lanes from the parking spaces, and planters and small islands. This pilot project was intended to demonstrate the effectiveness of protected lanes, and eventually the city would build permanent concrete separators and wider bike lanes, making the changes permanent.

But on June 2, OakDOT Director Ryan Russo recommended abandoning the protected lanes and returning the street to a buffered layout. The announcement caught many by surprise and marked an about-face for one of the transportation department’s most high-profile projects.

In a blog post explaining his decision, Russo wrote that it came down to three things. First, the many staggered outlets and entry points for cars, bikes, and pedestrians created dangerous intersections between the protected bike lanes and traffic. Second, the protected design, at least in its pilot phase, failed to alleviate potentially harmful economic effects on local businesses. And third, OakDOT was unable to conduct sufficient and equitable community outreach about the redesign and its impacts. Russo said further improvements could not overcome these issues.

“We brought in well-received bus boarding islands, two kinds of plastic posts, and planters designed to both beautify and protect the installation,” he wrote about improvements. “But each of these interventions proved temporary and insufficient.” Cars ended up running over posts, people removed planters, and the islands caused accidents. 

Plastic bollards help separate Telegraph’s bike lane from parking and traffic, including on this stretch between West Grand Avenue and 27th Street. Credit: Amir Aziz

The

Apr
2020
7

Vehicle fleeing MSP reaches over 100 mph in Oakland County before crash in Sterling Heights

OAKLAND COUNTY, Mich. – A vehicle fleeing Michigan State Police troopers reached speeds of over 100 mph in Oakland County before crashing in Sterling Heights, authorities said.

You can watch the full video above.

Michigan State Police troopers were called around 12:30 p.m. Wednesday about a carjacking suspect fleeing police. They said he was involved in several incidents in Detroit and Eastpointe.

Detroit police officers were initially chasing the vehicle, but stopped when it crossed into Royal Oak.

The vehicle sped through Royal Oak and into Troy, according to authorities. State troopers took over the pursuit.

Troopers tried to stop the driver on Metro Parkway, but he led them into a subdivision along Metro Parkway and then eastbound through several cities.

The chase ended with a violent crash in Sterling Heights. Police said the man was approaching Dodge Park when he lost control of the vehicle, struck the curb and rolled over several times.

Both people in the car received non-life-threatening injuries and were taken to a nearby hospital in the custody of Eastpointe police.

No officers or members of the public were injured, police said.

State troopers will submit a report to prosecutors for fleeing and eluding, according to authorities.

The investigation is ongoing.

Police chase ends after crash in Oakland County. (Alex Atwell/WDIV)
Police chase ends after crash in Oakland County. (Alex Atwell/WDIV) (WDIV)

Copyright 2020 by WDIV ClickOnDetroit – All rights reserved.

Source Article