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Archive of posts published in the category: Identification
May
2

Department of Transportation | HDOT COVID-19 update: Identification credentials, safety checks, and vehicle registrations

HDOT COVID-19 update: Identification credentials, safety checks, and vehicle registrations

Posted on Apr 30, 2020 in Highways News, Main, News

HONOLULU – In consideration of Governor Ige’s 6th supplementary emergency proclamation through May 31, 2020, the Hawaii Department of Transportation (HDOT) provides the following updates on identification credentials, Periodic Motor Vehicle Inspections (PMVI or Safety Checks), and motor vehicle registrations.

Identification Credentials (Driver’s Licenses, State Identification Cards)

  • Driver’s licenses, instruction permits, and State Identification cards that expire between March 15 and May 31, 2020, are granted a 90-day waiver. All State-issued credentials expiring during this date range will be considered valid for an additional 90-days from the end of Governor Ige’s 6th supplementary emergency proclamation on May 31, 2020. This extension is to provide enough time for the public to obtain or renew credentials once face-to-face government services are reopened.
  • Commercial Driver’s License (CDL) holders with a CDL that expired between March 16, 2020 thru May 31, 2020, are allowed an extension of up to 90-days but the 90 days cannot go past June 30, 2020. The Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) has set June 30, 2020, as the last date that an extension may be granted. Please review HDOT’s frequently asked questions section at https://hidot.hawaii.gov/highways/faq/covid-19-cdl-faqs/
  • As previously announced by the Transportation Security Administration (TSA), expired driver’s licenses or State IDs that expired on or after March 1 can be used at TSA checkpoints. HDOT has also sent memorandum to the county police departments informing them of the previous expiration extension and will update this memo to minimize potential misunderstandings.

Safety Checks (PMVI)

  • Safety check certificates and stickers expiring on or before May 31, 2020, will remain valid until August 31, 2020. All other safety checks that expire in 2020 will be valid for an additional 3 months after the 2020 expiration date. Please review HDOT’s frequently asked questions section https://hidot.hawaii.gov/highways/faq/covid-19-safety-check-faqs/
  • After careful consideration and discussion with Governor Ige and the Counties, HDOT is extending the safety check waiver to minimize unnecessary face-to-face interactions and to provide enough time for PMVI stations, Counties, and the public to conduct and process safety checks once the stay-at-home order ends. HDOT fully supports the continued opening of stations for vehicle maintenance and repair, as these actions are critical to keep essential travel moving.
  • The safety check extension does not impact the validity of the motor vehicle registration. The motor vehicle registration must still be unexpired to be valid.

Motor Vehicle Registrations

  • Motor vehicle registrations are still being conducted by the Counties, see below for information by County:

City and County of Honolulu – Offers renewals by mail, by DMV NOW kiosks, and online.

County of Maui – Offers renewals by mail and online.

County of Hawaii – Offers renewals by mail, kiosks, and online.

County of Kauai – Offers renewals by mail and online.

  • Motor vehicle registration fees and any applicable penalty fees for late registration have not changed. These funds are necessary to meet the local share of upcoming stimulus projects
Apr
28

Vehicle Identification Number (VIN) Look Up Online

Finding Your VIN

You can locate your vehicle identification number in a few different places, both off and on your vehicle itself.

Off the Vehicle

If you need to find your VIN, you can first check any documentation you have for the vehicle, such as:

If you don’t have the documentation mentioned above, you can find the VIN on the actual vehicle itself.

On the Vehicle

The VIN can often be found on the lower-left corner of the dashboard, in front of the steering wheel. You can read the number by looking through the windshield. The VIN may also appear in a number of other locations:

  • Front of the engine block. This should be easy to spot by popping open the hood, and looking at the front of the engine.
  • Front of the car frame, near the container that holds windshield washer fluid.
  • Rear wheel well. Try looking up, directly above the tire.
  • Inside the driver-side doorjamb. Open the door, and look underneath where the side-view mirror would be located if the door was shut.
  • Driver-side doorpost. Open the door, and look near the spot where the door latches, not too far from the seatbelt return.
  • Underneath the spare tire.

If you still can’t locate the VIN, try consulting your vehicle manual. Or, call a dealership or the manufacturer and request guidance. You will need it to do a VIN check.

Recording Your VIN

Once you know your VIN, it’s important to record and store the number some place other than in the vehicle. This information is helpful in a number of situations:

Why Do Vehicles Have VINs?

The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) began requiring standardized VINs in 1954 for all road vehicles.

Vehicles model year 1981 and newer have a VIN made up of 17 characters (letters and numerals). Before that, the VIN length and format varied among vehicles.

The VIN provides clues as to a vehicle’s background, including:

  • The manufacturer.
  • Model year.
  • Where it was built.

In other words, the vehicle identification number records the vehicle’s identity. To learn what the individual characters in a VIN represent, visit our page on decoding the VIN.

Source Article

Apr
10

Free Vehicle Identification Number (VIN) Decoder & Lookup

What’s a VIN Number (Vehicle Identification Number)?




How many characters: 17 (digits and capital letters)
Where to find: Dashboard on the driver’s side
First digit stands for: Country of manufacturer

A vehicle identification number (VIN) is a unique code that is assigned to every motor vehicle when it’s manufactured. The VIN is a 17-character string of letters and numbers without intervening spaces or the letters Q (q), I (i), and O (o); these are omitted to avoid confusion with the numerals 0 and 1. Each section of the VIN provides a specific piece of information about the vehicle, including the year, country, and factory of manufacture; the make and model; and the serial number. VINs are usually printed in a single line.

How to Find VIN Number

How to Find the Vehicle’s VIN Number

On most passenger cars, you may find the VIN number on the front of the dashboard on the driver’s side. The best way to see it is to look through the windshield from outside the car. You may also find the VIN number on the driver’s side door pillar. Open the door and look around the area where the door latches to the car. A motorcycle’s VIN is usually on the steering neck below the handlebars, although sometimes it’s on the motor or on the frame near the motor. A semitrailer’s VIN is located on the front part of the semitrailer on the left side.

If you can’t find the VIN number on the vehicle, you should also be able to locate it on your vehicle’s title or liability insurance documents.

How to Use the VIN Decoder to Do a VIN Number Check

Enter your vehicle’s 17-character Vehicle Identification Number (VIN) in the field above to look up and receive an instant report on its manufacturer, brand, make and model, body style, engine size, assembly plant, and model year. The information is provided by the National Highway Traffic Safetly Administration (NHTSA) from the data submitted by the manufacturers to NHTSA. The VIN Decoder lookup is intended for use with vehicles manufactured since 1981. If your vehicle was made before 1981, the VIN will most likely contain 11 characters.

How to Decode the Vehicle Identification Number

Wondering what all the characters in your vehicle’s VIN stand for?

How to decode a Vehicle Identification (VIN) number

Why the VIN Is Important

There are situations in which you will want to check a vehicle’s VIN, since many data registries use it to record details of the vehicle’s history. If you’re interested in buying a used car, you can do a VIN lookup to get the vehicle history report and find records of its previous owners, accidents, and repairs. You can also find out if the manufacturer had ever issued a recall of the vehicle and whether those repairs were made. Finally, law enforcement agencies do a VIN check to identify vehicles that have been stolen.

Model Year Character Codes


Code Year Code Year Code Year Code Year
A