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Archive of posts published in the category: Grand
Apr
3

Transport Services, Trucking, Truck Drivers: Grand Meadow, MN: Valley Transportation Service

With over 30 years of transportation experience, we at Valley Transportation have concluded that you can only be as good as the people on your team. Valley Transportation has confidently, proudly put together the most qualified and capable team for each transportation job. With a fleet of nearly 200 trucks on the road and more on the way, Valley Transportation has grown steadily since its inception back in the 1980’s.

Brad Grafe, owner of Valley Transportation, prides himself on the fact that he has surrounded himself with many good people in every aspect of the business. Located in the heart of the Midwest, the good ole “Midwestern Work Ethic” is alive and well at Valley Transportation. The group of dispatchers and freight brokers that Brad has assembled has a combined work experience in the trucking industry of over 200 years. Valley Transportation makes every effort to get your equipment moved as fast and safely as possible. We highly value customer satisfaction because a happy customer is a repeat customer.

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Mar
31

Bicycling Information – Grand Canyon National Park (U.S. National Park Service)

Bicycling Information On This Page Navigation

 

Three images, from left to right, park shuttle bus carrying several bicycles up front in an external rack. A bicycle in campsite with blue tent. Bicycle rental facility with attendant talking with two customers.

 

South Rim

Looking to exchange four wheels for two? Bicycling is a great way to experience the South Rim. Cyclists can enjoy approximately 13 miles (21 km) of roads and Greenway Trails that allow for more intimate explorations along the rim. If you get tired, load your bike on one of the park’s bicycle-friendly shuttle buses – there is a bus stop every one-half to one-mile along the 13 mile-stretch.

Bicycles are allowed on all paved and unpaved roads on the South Rim. Be good to yourself and the environment – ride instead of drive.

 

Image: 2 bicyclists riding along a paved greenway path along the edge of a colorful canyon landscape
Cyclists riding along the Hermit Road Greenway. Photo courtesy Sarah Neal.

 

Hermit Road

Scenic Hermit Road follows the canyon rim for 7 miles (11 km) and is one of the best places in the park for cycling. Most of the year, private vehicle restrictions eliminate most traffic. Shuttle and tour buses do utilize the road, so cyclists should pull to the right shoulder in a safe location, dismount and let buses pass.

The Hermit Road Greenway Trail, between Monument Creek Vista and Hermits Rest, provides a 2.8-mile (4.5 km) bicycle path away from the road and, in places, along the rim of Grand Canyon.

 

top of sign shows map of Hermit Road Greenway. Text reads: The Hermit Road section of the Greenway Trail accommodates hikers, bicyclists, and visitors using wheelchairs. The trail meets Accessibility Guidelines for Outdoor Developed Areas.
The Hermit Road section of the Greenway Trail accommodates hikers, bicyclists, and visitors using wheelchairs. The trail meets Accessibility Guidelines for Outdoor Developed Areas. Much of the trail follows the 1912 alignment of Hermit Road. There are six overlooks, including Pima Point, in addition to multiple resting areas along the trail.

 

South Kaibab Trailhead and Yaki Point

Looking for a scenic, yet shorter cycling opportunity? Follow the paved Greenway Trail to the South Kaibab Trailhead and then ride along Yaki Point Road to Yaki Point. Access the Greenway near Grand Canyon Visitor Center and follow the South Kaibab Trailhead signs. In about 2.4 miles (3.9 km), you will come to the trailhead parking area. From here, turn right and follow the trailhead road until you come to Yaki Point Road. Make a left and follow it 0.5 miles (0.8 km) to Yaki Point. There are plenty of spectacular canyon views along the Greenway Trail and once you reach Yaki Point.

Like Hermit Road, private vehicle restrictions eliminate most traffic. Shuttle and tour buses do utilize Yaki Point Road, so cyclists should pull to the right shoulder in a safe location, dismount and let buses pass.

If you become tired of cycling, you can catch the Orange Shuttle (Kaibab Rim Route) at Yaki Point, The South Kaibab Trailhead, or Pipe Creek Overlook, put your bike in the front rack, and ride the bus back to the Visitor Center.

 

a woman boarding a white and green bus with a rack with two bicycles in front.
Returning with bicycles to the Visitor Center on the Tusayan Shuttle, after riding the 6.5 mile (10.4 km) Greenway trail from Grand Canyon Village to the gateway town of Tusayan.

 

Park in Tusayan & Ride the Shuttle

Want to leave the long entrance lines and parking frustrations behind? Ride the Tusayan Shuttle into the park and then cycle