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Archive of posts published in the category: Connected
May
11

Prairie Village police asking for help identifying vehicle connected to homicide

The Prairie Village Police Department is asking for the public’s help identifying a car that is believed to be connected the homicide of an 18-year-old man who was found Tuesday morning outside a home in the 3500 block of Somerset Drive.Police said the vehicle appears to be a blue crossover-type vehicle and investigators believe it to possibly be either a 2013-2019 Ford Focus, Hyundai Elantra hatchback, or Nissan Juke. The video above was from 2:48 a.m. Tuesday at the intersection at 75th Street and Mission Road.“A vehicle of interest has been developed during the investigation, and the Prairie Village Police Department is requesting assistance from the public in identifying the vehicle and the vehicle owners,” the department said in a news release.Police are asking anyone with information to please call the Prairie Village Police Department at 913-385-4603 or call the TIPS Hotline at 816-474-TIPS.Police said they got the call at 6:18 a.m. Tuesday and when they arrived, they found Kiven Maquial, of Mission, Kansas, on the ground with a gunshot wound. He died at the scene.Police said the investigation is being conducted by the Prairie Village Police Department, Johnson County Crime Lab and the Johnson County Medical Examiner.ORIGINAL STORYThe Prairie Village Police Department said the shooting death of an 18-year-old man who was found outside a home in the 3500 block of Somerset Drive is being investigated as a homicide.Police said they got the call at 6:18 a.m. Tuesday and when they arrived, they found Kiven Maquial, of Mission, Kansas, on the ground with a gunshot wound. He died at the scene.Police said the investigation is being conducted by the Prairie Village Police Department, Johnson County Crime Lab and the Johnson County Medical Examiner.Police are asking anyone with information to please call the Prairie Village Police Department at 913-385-4603 or call the TIPS Hotline at 816-474-TIPS.

The Prairie Village Police Department is asking for the public’s help identifying a car that is believed to be connected the homicide of an 18-year-old man who was found Tuesday morning outside a home in the 3500 block of Somerset Drive.

Police said the vehicle appears to be a blue crossover-type vehicle and investigators believe it to possibly be either a 2013-2019 Ford Focus, Hyundai Elantra hatchback, or Nissan Juke. The video above was from 2:48 a.m. Tuesday at the intersection at 75th Street and Mission Road.

“A vehicle of interest has been developed during the investigation, and the Prairie Village Police Department is requesting assistance from the public in identifying the vehicle and the vehicle owners,” the department said in a news release.

Police are asking anyone with information to please call the Prairie Village Police Department at 913-385-4603 or call the TIPS Hotline at 816-474-TIPS.

Police said they got the call at 6:18 a.m. Tuesday and when they arrived, they found Kiven Maquial, of Mission, Kansas, on the ground with a gunshot wound. He died at the scene.

Police said the investigation is being conducted by the Prairie

Apr
30

Automotive IoT – Solutions for Connected Cars

automotive iot

With new opportunities come new challenges. 

The market for automotive IoT and connected cars is set to reach a staggering $133 billion by 2024 – generating serious potential profits for OEM’s and Tier 1 suppliers. 

Reliable connectivity for connected cars can help with everything from Telematics to preventive maintenance to accident prevention and enhanced entertainment systems. 

Autonomous driving will be facilitated by V2X (vehicle to everything) connectivity and the emergence of 5G connected cars, which will provide a new – more convenient – driving experience.

But connected cars will meet challenges and stiff resistance too. 

It will only take a couple of accidents caused by connected technology for progress to be delayed by years. Regulators and consumer groups will also push back against anything they perceive as risky.

To succeed in this exciting new market, automotive suppliers and car manufacturers will need to show they meet the highest standards of security and connectivity. 

The IoT in Automotive market worth $133B in 2024

 

4 key features connected car offerings must deliver 

Car manufacturers and Tier 1 providers need to build trust in their connected car offerings if they are to enter this lucrative and fast-growing market. They must demonstrate that connected cars offer: 

  • Inviolable security
    If a connected car can be breached, the risks are enormous – from private data being leaked to hackers taking control of the vehicle. Any connected securing element must implement the highest security standards. 
  • Device lifecycle management
    It needs to be possible to remotely update, patch, and improve connected car applications and embedded devices. This process will keep connected cars working at optimal performance and protect them against new cyber risks while enhancing the user experience.
     
  • Always-on, reliable connectivity
    Any connected automobile must be able to transmit data rapidly and reliably. Delays could confuse the driver and even generate accidents. 
  • Worldwide and seamless operation
    Any connected vehicle component, device, or app must be suitable for deployment in any market around the world without complex adjustments for different markets.  

Thales’ dedicated automotive connectivity solutions, advanced security expertise, and device lifecycle management platform allow you to meet the requirements of the connected car of the future. OEM’s and Tier 1 suppliers use our dedicated eSIM, and cellular modules are used by for a wide range of applications.

 

Thales State-of-the-Art Automotive Solutions provide OEMs and Tier 1 suppliers with:

  • Dedicated automotive-grade cellular connectivity modules
  • Product design according to AEC Q100
  • LTE Advanced Pro high-speed connectivity
  • V2X secure connectivity
  • Advanced temperature management
  • Automotive-grade eSIM and Secure Element
  • Embedded processing
  • Renowned security expertise: ID and credential management, and full data encryption
  • Fully certified automotive quality processes and services

Thales solutions for automotive IoT

CONNECT smart vehicles

CONNECT smart vehicles

Vehicle manufacturers demand uninterrupted connectivity from any smart device in their cars – delays in data transmission could put lives at risk or spoil the user experience. Thales’ dedicated automotive connectivity solutions offer you:

  • Robust and tamper-proof cellular modules which reliably transmits data even in the most extreme environments of temperature, vibration or moisture 
  • Embedded
Apr
2

What’s Next? V2V (Vehicle-to-Vehicle) Communication With Connected Cars

There’s plenty of buzz around the connected car these days. The reason? The cloud.

There is a common refrain heard from nearly everyone gathered in Detroit to attend the World Congress on Intelligent Transport Systems this week: Connected cars will be the ultimate Internet of Things. They will collect and make sense of massive amounts of data from a huge array of sources. Cars will talk to other cars, exchanging data and alerting drivers to potential collisions. They’ll talk to sensors on signs on stoplights, bus stops, even ones embedded in the roads to get traffic updates and rerouting alerts. And they’ll communicate with your house, office, and smart devices, acting as an digital assistant, gathering information you need to go about your day. 

To do all that, they need the cloud. Because connected cars need data. Lots of data. Automobiles today are already packed with an impressive amount of processing power, because some 100 million lines of software code help run the typical luxury vehicle. But as connected cars before were sophisticated rolling wired devices, the amount of information flowing back and forth from them will skyrocket. And so they will demand for the cloud’s scalability and storage capabilities.  

The cloud also provides sophisticated processing and analytical capabilities. The cloud is the central hub where all of this quickly changing, far-flung information will pass through. It will provide the platform for making sense of this data. And the cloud is also the home for building and developing the apps and programs used by cars on the road.

What does that add up to practically? A car linked to the cloud, tapping into your apps, devices, and preferences will tailor the driving experience to you. When you’re getting ready to go out in the morning, your car will link to the cloud and check the weather, your to-do list from your calendar, and the traffic to help you plan your route for the day, rerouting you when you’re on your way if you get behind schedule or run into traffic. Or a rental car would recognize you when you slip into the driver’s seat and automatically adjusts to your preferences — changing the mirrors, giving you an update from your calendar of your schedule, and lining up your iTunes playlist.

Connected cars, meantime, will help cities and states cut down on congestion and improve safety. On the road, cars will talk to each other, automatically transmitting data such as speed, position, and direction, and send alerts to each other if a crash seems imminent. This future of vehicle-to-vehicle, or V2V communication, is already in the works, with the U.S. Department of Transportation announcing early this year that it plans to start taking steps to enable V2V communication.

At the same time, communities are mapping out ways to put connected cars at the center of more energy efficient, smarter traffic management systems. IBM conducted a smarter traffic pilot with the Dutch city of Eindhoven, demonstrating how the connected car automatically shares

Apr
2

Connected Vehicle Solution | AWS Solutions

AWS Connected Vehicle Solution architecture

When AWS IoT receives a message, it authenticates and authorizes the message and the Rules Engine executes the appropriate rule on the message, which routes the message to the appropriate backend application.

An AWS IoT rule sends telematics data to an Amazon Kinesis Firehose delivery stream, which encrypts and streams raw vehicle telematics data to an Amazon S3 bucket. If an Amazon Kinesis Analytics application detects an anomaly, the record is sent to Amazon Kinesis Streams, which invokes an AWS Lambda function that parses the record, stores it in an Amazon DynamoDB table, and triggers an Amazon Simple Notification Service (Amazon SNS) notification to users.

The trip data AWS IoT rule invokes an AWS Lambda function that processes vehicle telematics data during a trip and stores it in a DynamoDB table.

The driver safety score AWS IoT rule detects the end of a trip and invokes an AWS Lambda function that processes aggregate trip data to generate a driver’s safety score, trigger an Amazon SNS notification to the driver, and add the score to the trip data table.

The diagnostic trouble code AWS IoT rule detects diagnostic trouble codes in the IoT topic and invokes Lambda functions that store the trouble code in a DynamoDB table, translate the trouble code into layman’s terms, and trigger an Amazon SNS notification to the user.

The location-based marketing AWS IoT rule detects the location of the vehicle and invokes a Lambda function that determines whether the vehicle is near a point of interest. When the vehicle is near a point of interest, the function logs the location in a DynamoDB table and triggers an Amazon SNS notification to the user that contains an advertisement.

Source Article

Mar
30

Intelligent Transportation Systems – Connected Vehicle Pilot Deployment Program

CV Pilots News & Events


CV Pilots Deployment Resources

Device Deployment Status

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Using Connected Vehicle Technologies to Solve Real-World Operational Problems

Connected vehicles are poised to transform our streets, communities, and personal lives. But before these technologies can be deployed broadly, there are a number of technical, institutional, and financial challenges — challenges that can only be understood and overcome by putting these emerging technologies to work in real-world situations, solving real problems. The U.S. Department of Transportation (USDOT) is supporting the advancement of connected vehicle technology with a pilot deployment program that is uncovering what barriers remain and how to address them, documenting lessons learned, and serving as a template assisting other early CV technology deployments.


The USDOT has awarded cooperative agreements collectively worth more than $45 million to three pilot sites in New York City; Wyoming; and Tampa to implement a suite of connected vehicle applications and technologies tailored to meet their region’s unique transportation needs. These pilot sites are helping connected vehicles make the final leap into real-world deployment so that they can deliver on their promises to increase safety, improve personal mobility, enhance economic productivity, reduce environmental impacts and transform public agency operations. Moreover, these sites are laying the groundwork for even more dramatic transformations as other areas follow in their footsteps. Program resources targeting the early deployer community include technical documentation, webinars, and documented success stories.


As a first step, each site spent 12 months preparing a comprehensive deployment concept to ensure rapid and efficient connected vehicle capability roll-out. The sites are now completing a 24 month phase to design, build, and test these deployments of integrated wireless in-vehicle, mobile device, and roadside technologies. As of Fall 2018, the sites are entering into the third phase of the deployment where the tested connected vehicle systems will be operational for a minimum 18-month period and system impact will be monitored on a set of key performance measures.

Please explore this site for a more detailed description of CV Pilots objectives, phases, and research progress. We will continue to upload relevant program information for public consumption as it becomes available. For inquiries regarding the individual pilots, please contact the respective Point of Contacts: NYCDOT pilot – Wesam Daraghmeh, WDaraghmeh@dot.nyc.gov and Mohamad Talas,Mtalas@dot.nyc.gov; Tampa (THEA) pilot – Steve Novosad, snovosad@hntb.com; WYDOT pilot – dot-cvpilot@wyo.gov.

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