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Archive of posts published in the category: Chip
May
11

From Cantona’s chip to Rooney’s bicycle – Manchester United’s best Premier League goals

A look back through the Old Trafford archives offers a striking masterclass from some of the greatest marksmen to have graced English football, with the likes of Mark Hughes, Andy Cole, Dwight Yorke and Ruud van Nistelrooy having plundered goals for the club.

Every United fan has their own favourite goal from the Premier League era, with unforgettable hits lighting up each of the 13 title triumphs achieved under Sir Alex Ferguson.

We’ve picked out eight of the very best, all of which came during the Ferguson era – a time when goals were easier to come by than they have been of late for Ole Gunnar Solskjaer’s side.

David Beckham v Wimbledon, August 17, 1996

It was the opening day of the 1996-97 season and Ferguson gave the number 10 shirt to the 21-year-old midfielder David Beckham.

United were already 2-0 up and heading for a straightforward victory at Selhurst Park when Beckham received the ball from Brian McClair and, from just inside his own half, launched it audaciously into the air, over the head of Dons goalkeeper Neil Sullivan and into the net.

It was one of the most memorable goals in Premier League history and one Beckham himself names as the pick of his career.

Eric Cantona v Sunderland, December 20, 1996

Four months after Beckham’s famous lob, United were 4-0 up against Sunderland at Old Trafford when Eric Cantona – in what was to be his final season at the club – collected the ball just inside the Black Cats’ half.

The enigmatic Frenchman drove forward in possession, exchanged passes with Brian McClair, and then produced an exquisite chip over the stranded Lionel Perez that clipped the inside of the post on the way in.

He then turned, flipped his collar, and spawned a celebration that would be imitated by United fans everywhere for years to come.

Paul Scholes v Bradford City, March 25, 2000

Paul Scholes has spoken about the understanding he shared with Beckham during their days at United, and that intuition paid off in spades at Valley Parade in 1999-2000.

Beckham sent a corner straight to the edge of the Bradford City penalty area where Scholes was waiting with his hammer of a right foot, which arrowed a volley into the Bradford net with scorching ferocity.

Ruud van Nistelrooy v Fulham, March 22, 2003

Given his reputation as a penalty-area predator, it is understandable that Fulham’s defenders might not have taken the threat of Van Nistelrooy running towards them from just inside his own half too seriously.

The Netherlands international had the last laugh, though, waltzing past a host of flat-footed Cottagers before tucking the ball past Maik Taylor with his customary composure.

Paul Scholes v Aston Villa, December 23, 2006

May
10

Arbe Launches Automotive Grade Imaging Radar Processor Chip

Israeli startup Arbe, which has raised $55 million to date to develop a 4D imaging radar chipset, has today announced exclusively through EE Times that it has now launched its imaging radar processor chip as part of the chipset.

The company said this is the first automotive grade (AEC-Q100) dedicated imaging radar processing chip. The patented chip is capable of processing the raw data generated by 48 receiving channels and 48 transmitting channels, generating 30 frames per second, meeting automotive power constraints. This, it said, is higher than has ever been achieved on an automotive radar processing chip, while doing so in an “efficient and cost-effective manner”.

Additionally, the processor can scale from high resolution to ultra-high resolution and support over 100,000 detections per frame. According to Arbe, this ability to process such a high channel count provides unparalleled performance and safety to the automotive market. The radar processing chip enables the integration of smart detection algorithms, clustering, post processing and SLAM (simultaneous localization and mapping) into the chip. The processor is designed in accordance with the international standard for functional safety (ISO 26262), and the processor enables ASIL B (Automotive Safety Integrity Level) qualification for the radar chip.

Arbe’s chipset produces detailed 4D images, separates, identifies, and tracks objects in high resolution in both azimuth and elevation on top of range and Doppler resolutions, in a long range and a wide field of view, and complemented by AI-based post-processing and SLAM.  The company has also developed its own proprietary millimeter wave automotive grade radar RFIC chipset that includes a transmitter chip with 24 output channels and a receiver chip with 12 input channels. Using a 22FDX FDSOI CMOS process, Arbe’s RF chipset is designed to support TD-MIMO with strong performance characteristics for channel isolation, noise and transmit power.

The CEO of Arbe, Kobi Marenko, said, “The amount of processing capabilities that we incorporated on our radar chipset solution is one that has never been achieved before in automotive radar. Our technology will bring the safety of vehicles to a new level with low power and low cost. We are excited to ship the processer chip to Tier 1 customers as part of a chipset solution that supports their next gen radar system developments.”

The company said its processor provides more processing power, low latency, and low power while cutting the cost to implement a safe radar solution. We delved into these performance claims a little more to qualify them.

First, on processing power, Arbe said the processor is capable of processing 30 Gbps of data, representing a virtual array of over 2300 virtual channels. Today most radars are processing less than  10% of the bandwidth and usually up to 12 virtual channels. With regard to the latency claim, Arbe said 30 fps provides real-time frames every 33 ms, which enables a maximum latency from the end of a point cloud frame until it is received at the main ECU of 34ms.

What about power consumption? Arbe said the chip