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Archive of posts published in the category: child
May
1

7-year-old child struck by vehicle in Saint Paul

Police say a 7-year-old boy was hit by a pickup near the intersection of S. Robert Street and Wood while trying to catch his school bus.

ST PAUL, Minn. — St. Paul Police say a child is hospitalized in critical but stable condition after being struck by a vehicle Thursday morning on the city’s west side.

Police spokesman Steve Linders says it happened near the intersection of South Robert Street and Wood around 6:30 a.m. The victim was a 7-year-old boy who was in the crosswalk, crossing Robert Street with two siblings when he was struck by a pickup driven by a 59-year-old St. Paul man. 

“It’s one of the most important things we can do as adults and drivers, is look out for kids,” Linders reflected. “In the City of St. Paul we’ve had several people struck by vehicles this year.” 

Linders says the driver of the pickup remained on scene and is cooperating. Preliminary tests showed no signs of impairment. Investigators are talking to witnesses and trying to locate surveillance footage that would reveal if the school bus driver had the stop arm extended and lights flashing at the time of the accident. 

KARE 11 has a crew on scene and will have the latest details as they become available.


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Apr
11

Car Seat.Org – Carseat, Automobile & Child Passenger Safety Community Forums

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Apr
1

Choose the right child car seat

Using the right child car seat is the best way to prevent serious injury to children in collisions. This information will help you find the right child car seat for your child’s height, weight and development.

Canadian motor vehicle safety standards label

What to look for

When you buy a child car seat for use in Canada, look for the National Safety Mark label attached to the seat. This label indicates that the seat complies with Canadian regulations and standards and is legal for use in Canada.

Every child car seat and booster seat sold in Canada has an expiry or useful life date on it and should not be used past that date.

Child car seats for infants

Newborn babies and infants need special protection while in a vehicle. In a collision, a properly installed rear-facing child car seat can save your baby’s life.

Ontario’s Highway Traffic Act requires children to use a rear-facing car seat until the child weighs at least 9 kg (20 lb.).

It’s best to keep your child in a rear-facing child car seat until they reach the manufacturer’s recommended maximum weight and height limits. Some rear-facing car seats are made for children that weigh up to 20 kg (45 lb.)

When a child outgrows the maximum weight or height limits of an infant rear-facing car seat, they may move to a larger convertible infant/child car seat and stay rear-facing until the child is ready to face forward.

Child car seats for toddlers

Ontario’s Highway Traffic Act allows children weighing 9 kg to 18 kg (20 to 40 lb.) to use a forward-facing child car seat or a rear-facing car seat as long as the car seat manufacturer recommends its use.

It’s best to keep your child in a forward-facing child car seat until they reach the manufacturer’s recommended maximum weight and height limits.

A forward-facing car seat uses a tether strap to prevent the child car seat from moving forward and causing injury in a collision. It is important to use the tether strap exactly as the manufacturer recommends.

Booster seats

Booster seats raise children so adult seat belts protect them better. Booster seats protect children from serious injury 3-½ times better than seat belts alone.

Ontario’s Highway Traffic Act requires children weighing 18 kg to 36 kg (40 to 80 lb.), standing less than 145 cm (4 ft. 9 in.) tall and who are under the age of 8 to use a booster seat or allows the continued use of a forward-facing seat as long as the car seat manufacturer recommends its use. It’s best to keep your child in a booster seat until they reach the manufacturer’s recommended maximum weight and height limits.

Seatbelts

Seatbelts are designed for adults and older children. Children may be ready to move from a booster seat to a vehicle’s seatbelt once:

  • they can sit all the way against the back of the vehicle seat with legs bent comfortably over the edge and maintain this position for the entire trip
  • they