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Archive of posts published in the category: CALIFORNIA
Mar
30

Everything You Need to Know About California HOV Stickers

California CAV decal

If you’re more than a little confused by California’s rules allowing clean cars into the much-prized diamond lanes, join the club. The state DMV and the California Air Resources Board (CARB) haven’t done a great job of clarifying HOV matters. So let’s take a look at California HOV stickers and what vehicles are eligible.

California HOV Stickers

In order to encourage people to buy the cleanest vehicles and move away from vehicles that run on petroleum, California implemented a Clean Air Vehicle Decal Program. This program permits vehicles that meet specified emissions standards to be issued a HOV sticker or CAV decal to drive in carpool lanes at single occupancy.

*All CAV decals or HOV stickers must remain with the vehicle to which they were originally issued. They CANNOT be transferred to another vehicle. And if you purchase a vehicle that already is been issued an HOV sticker than you must transfer the decal to your name.

How Do I Apply for CAV Decal?

  1. Fill out an application for Clean Air Vehicle Decals REG 1000
  2. Mail the completed application with a $22 decal fee (no cash) to the address printed on the form.
  3. Wait for the stickers to be sent to you (usually within 30 business days)

Here are the DMV tips to ensure your application is complete and you receive your ticket:

  • Ensure your vehicle is checking the CARB eligibility list 
  • Provide all vehicle information at the top of the form.
  • In section 1, provide your (the current registered owner’s) name and address. The address on the application must match the address on the vehicle registration card.
  • In section 2, check “Original decals”, if the vehicle has never been issued a CAV decal
  • In section 3, read all important information, print your name, telephone number, and sign the form

California HOV Stickers 2020

The 2020 CAV decal is orange and expires on 1/1/2024. Other acceptable HOV stickers:

Purple – Year issued 2019 and expires on 1/1/2023

Red – Year issued 2018 and expires on 1/1/2022

According to DMV.ca.gov, “These CAV decals are issued to vehicles that meet California’s super ultra-low emission vehicle (SULEV), inherently low-emission vehicle (ILEV) and transitional zero emission vehicle (TZEV) evaporative emission standard for exhaust emissions.  Compressed natural gas (CNG) and Liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) fueled vehicles may also qualify for the CAV decal program.”

How Do I Know If My Vehicle is Eligible?

If you drive a hybrid electric, battery electric, plug-in hybrid or other low-emission vehicle, you may be eligible to apply for a HOV sticker. The only way to determine if your specific vehicle is eligible for a California HOV sticker is to check CARB’s eligibility list.

TicketBust Can Help Today

Through TicketBust, we build solid defenses to fight traffic citations. We use a premier system that has processed thousands of tickets and cases and is successful in providing clients the best opportunity of getting their ticket dismissed. 

To learn more about our services, contact TicketBust today!

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Mar
30

City of Lakewood, California – Bike Safety

Drivers Can Help ‘Share the Road’

Bike riders are common in Lakewood.Sharing the road is key for drivers and bicyclists. Bike safety is an important concern to riders and drivers. Over 100 people are killed and thousands are injured in bicycle collisions with cars each year in California. Many victims are children. Some accidents are due to motorists’ lack of attention; others to bicyclists’ actions.

  • Pass a bicyclist as you would a slow-moving vehicle. Pass with caution, and only when safe.
  • Look carefully for bicyclists before opening doors next to moving traffic.
  • Do not drive in the bike lane except when entering or leaving a roadway or when preparing for a turn within a distance of 200 feet from an intersection.
  • Do not overtake a bicyclist just before making a turn. Merge first behind the bicyclist, then turn.

Bicyclists Can Help “Share the Road”

  • Wear reflective clothing to be seen by drivers when riding at night.
  • Ride in the same direction as the traffic. You will be coming in an unexpected direction and may not be seen by drivers if you ride on the wrong side of the road.
  • Keep your eyes on the road ahead. Avoid running over potholes, gravel, broken glass, drainage grates, puddles you can’t see through, or other unsafe road conditions.
  • Always look over your shoulder to make sure the lane is clear before turning or changing lanes and always signal before changing lanes.
  • Obey STOP signs and signals. It’s a good idea to stop for yellow lights—rushing through a yellow light may not leave you enough time to make it across the intersection before the light changes.
  • Wear a helmet to reduce the risk of head injury. It’s the law for children under the age of 18 when riding a bicycle, scooter, skateboard or skates.

Click here for a printable flyer of bike and vehicle safety tips.

Bikeways & Bike Trails

Lakewood bicyclists are fortunate to have nearby access to the San Gabriel River Bike Trail, which is a “Class 1” bikeway ending at the ocean in Seal Beach. Lakewood’s Rynerson Park offers parking for bicyclists, and is located on Studebaker Road just south of Del Amo Boulevard.

Maps

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Mar
12

Los Angeles California Bike Paths

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This is a guide to Class I paved bicycle paths around Los Angeles, and around Northern Orange County California:

‘Class I,’ paved, separate right-of-ways, mostly in parks, along rivers, beaches, and along lakesides.

 


View L A Bike Paths in a larger map

Bike Paths

This site is owned, built, hosted and maintained by Internet consultant Scott Hendison, who grew up in LA, but now lives in Portland Oregon. The site was originally built in 2004 using Microsoft notepad, and it was converted to WordPress around 10 years later. As you can see, we need newer images and bike path updates, including editing the maps themselves in Google Maps. If you’re interested in helping, we’d love to hear from you!

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Mar
6

Dealing With Repossession Under California Law

If your car has been repossessed and you live in California, here’s what you need to know.

Most people think that if they don’t pay the car loan, the lender will come to repossess the vehicle. Once that’s done, they figure it’s all over.

That’s exactly what my client thought when the tow truck was hauling away his Ford Explorer. Fast forward a few months and he knows better.

Now, so can you.

When A Vehicle Can Be Repossessed

In the beginning, there’s a car loan. You miss a payment and figure that a delay of a few days won’t make a difference. With so many cars in California, it’s not uncommon to be late by at least a few days.

What you don’t know is that under California law, the lender can repossess your vehicle without any prior notice to you so long as you’re as little as one day late on payment.

In fact, the lender can repossess a car in California whenever there’s a default in the terms of the contract. That includes not only missing a payment but also an insurance lapse.

It’s a good idea to read the contract carefully so you can find the landmines.

Who Can Repossess A Vehicle

Under California law, the car finance company as well as a registered repossession agency can repossess your automobile.

In order to have authority to repossess the vehicle, the company must be licensed or registered with the California Department of Consumer Affairs, Bureau of Security and Investigative Services. You should always ask to see the license before surrendering your car to a repo agent, and verify that license with the California Bureau of Security and Investigative Services.

Place And Time Of Repossession (And The Shakedown)

A repossession agent in California can’t come into a private building such as a garage, nor can they enter a secured or locked area such as a gated driveway, without the permission of the owner of the premises.

Your car can, however, be repossessed from unsecured driveways, streets, parking lots, and other publicly accessible areas in California at any time of day or night.

You don’t need to be present when the vehicle is taken, so if you park on the street and go to sleep there’s a chance the car may be gone when you wake up.

If you happen to be present when the car’s being taken, you may be able to save the car by paying the balance due rather than losing your wheels. If that happens then you have the right to receive an itemized receipt, and the repossession agent is required to forward your payment to the car lenders.

Timeline After Repossession

Once the car is repossessed, the clock starts ticking.

California law gives the repossession agency 48 hours to give you a Notice of Seizure that provides you with the name and contact information of both the legal owner and the repossession agency.

You must also be given an Inventory of Personal Effects that

Feb
15

CARS : California Auto Registration Service

 

Welcome
We are a licensed and bonded vehicle registration service company with over 24 years of experience.

“Vehicle Registration Service Without the DMV Wait”
Licensed by the California Department of Motor Vehicles

Some of our services include:
Vehicle Registration Renewal, Replacement of lost or stolen plates, stickers and/or registration card, and Change of Ownership.

Other Services :
• We also offer 2290 and CA Numbers, MC, etc.
• Registration, Plates, Transfers, and Services for out-of-state cars.

 

Source Article

Jan
14

California Vehicle Registration Renewal – Renew CA Tag

Registration Renewal Fees

In addition to a motor vehicle’s initial registration renewal fee, California residents may also be required to pay other fees before they can renew their registration. These fees can include:

  • Local county or district fees for special programs
  • Fees for specialty license plates (Specialty Equipment)
  • Vehicle license fee (VLF) at .65% the value of the vehicle
  • Delinquency fees for things like unpaid tickets and late renewal

If your vehicle has not been operated for over 90 days, you may file for a Planned Non-Operation. Additionally, you may be eligible for a tax deduction on your vehicle license fee (VLF) after you renew your registration. For more information about how California registration fees are calculated, please click here.

Registration Renewal for Fleets

Let eTags manage your vehicle services so you can run a safer, more productive, more compliant fleet. Big or small, we can renew registrations for all types of fleet sizes including cars, trucks, SUVs and more. eTags is 100% online, saving you 100% of the time with a dedicated log-in for zero hassles and zero downtime.

Renew registrations for all types of fleet sizes

Emission and Smog Testing

In the state of California, motor vehicles owners will be required to have their vehicle undergo an emission and smog test every other year. The registration renewal notice that you’ll receive in the mail will state whether or not your motor vehicle requires it on that renewal year. There are some vehicles that do not require smog testing or qualify for a smog exemption. They include:

  • Hybrids
  • Trailers
  • Electric vehicles
  • Motorcycles
  • Any vehicle made before 1975
  • Diesel vehicles made before 1997
  • Vehicles less than 6 years old and have paid a $20.00 abatement fee
  • Vehicles powered by natural gas that weigh more than 14,000 pounds

For more information about smog regulations for California registration, please visit the Smog Information page

Source Article

Dec
12

California Bicycle Laws – CalBike

The California Vehicle Code contains the state laws that specify where and how bikes must operate. For the most part, bicyclists have the same rights and responsibilities as motor vehicle drivers. (CVC 21200).

There are some specific rules. Below, for your benefit, we summarize the key sections of the law that relate to cycling.

WHERE YOU CAN RIDE

If you’re moving as fast as traffic, you can ride wherever you want.

If you’re moving slower than traffic, you can “take the lane” if it’s not wide enough for a bike and a vehicle to safely share side-by-side. The law says that people who ride bikes must ride as close to the right side of the road as practicable except under the following conditions: when passing, preparing for a left turn, avoiding hazards, if the lane is too narrow to share, or if approaching a place where a right turn is authorized. (CVC 21202) Unfortunately, some motorists and even police don’t understand cyclists’ right to “take the lane.” If you have a legal problem based on this understanding, consider calling one of the bike-friendly lawyers we identify on our “Crash Help” page.

Use the bicycle lane. On a roadway with a bike lane, bicyclists traveling slower than traffic must use the bike lane except when making a left turn, passing, avoiding hazardous conditions, or approaching a place where a right turn is authorized. CVC 21208

You don’t have to use the “protected bike lane.” Once a bike lane is separated from moving traffic with posts or car parking or anything else, it’s no longer a “bike lane” according to the law; it’s a “separated bikeway.” CVC 21208 does not apply. You may ride outside of the separated bikeway for any reason. (SHC 890.4d)

Ride with traffic. Bicyclists must travel on the right side of the roadway in the direction of traffic, except when passing, making a legal left turn, riding on a one-way street, riding on a road that is too narrow, or when the right side of the road is closed due to road construction. CVC 21650

Mopeds and high-speed electric bikes are not like regular bikes. Gas-powered bicycles and type 3 electric bicycles (with top assisted speeds of 28 mph) may not be used on trails or bike paths or lanes unless allowed by local authorities. They may be used in bike lanes or separated bikeways adjacent to the roadway. CVC 21207.5  They require helmets and may not be operated by people under age 16.

Low-speed electric bicycles are almost like regular bikes. Type 1 and 2 electric bicycles (with top assisted speeds of 20 mph) are allowed wherever regular bikes are allowed unless a sign specifically prohibits electric bicycles.

Bike path obstruction: No one may stop on or park a bicycle on a bicycle path. CVC 21211

SidewalksIndividual cities and counties control whether bicyclists may ride on sidewalks.  CVC 21206

FreewaysBicycles (including motorized bicycles) may not be ridden on freeways and expressways where doing

Nov
19

Transportation Inter California To Tijuana B C in Norwalk, CA with Reviews

YP – The Real Yellow PagesSM – helps you find the right local businesses to meet your specific needs. Search results are sorted by a combination of factors to give you a set of choices in response to your search criteria. These factors are similar to those you might use to determine which business to select from a local Yellow Pages directory, including proximity to where you are searching, expertise in the specific services or products you need, and comprehensive business information to help evaluate a business’s suitability for you. “Preferred” listings, or those with featured website buttons, indicate YP advertisers who directly provide information about their businesses to help consumers make more informed buying decisions. YP advertisers receive higher placement in the default ordering of search results and may appear in sponsored listings on the top, side, or bottom of the search results page.

Source Article

Nov
8

California Automotive and Mobile Mechanics

Here’s the good news about this service:

They will talk your ear off about what’s wrong with your car. They will also answer any questions about what “could be” the problem with your car.

They also offer you “cash deals” that are cheaper than using a credit card. like almost $100 cheaper.

Here’s the bad news:

not only are they extremely overpriced,  even the cash deals are a joke, and what’s worse, they really fail to address the problem of your car.

Case and point:

Had an issue with my car. its a 2004 ford. Cost me $600 bucks (cash only deal!) to install an $84 oxygen sensor and “flush the engine”. Where’s the cost? The four hours (at nearly 200 an hour) to “diagnosis and fix” the issue.

A week later, my check engine came back on. Another oxygen sensor. The oh so helpful Rebecca and her right hand man, explained that  my car has four sensors, and sometimes, all they go out in a row.

How convenient.

Now, I get that my situation is unique (not really!) and that “these things happen” to cars (all to often!) But when, returning, the friendly cali auto told me it would cost me nearly the same just to put another sensor in, that’s when its time to look for another one of the hundred mechanics around town.

They are friendly, and the very loud birds in their office will distract you from the true problem of this business. They take you for a ride, and tell you its a good deal.

UPDATE : 11/15/10:

Just got my car checked out from a AAA approved mechanic. NOT ONLY did this car shop overcharge for a repair (the AAA shop estimated at $298, the above shop, “california auto” charged me $600) they also diagnosed and “fixed” the wrong thing. It wasn’t an oxygen sensor at all, it was something completely different (and cheaper). By the way, “california auto” took FOUR HOURS to diagnose the wrong issue, and the AAA approved shop took TWO.

Most of the reviews here are for little repair or maintenance work, like an oil change, and fail to address the real point of a car repair shop, which is to not only have your car be repaired, but to repair the actual problem, and not overcharge for it.

This company does none of the above, and please take my experience as a warning, and avoid this shop at all costs.

Source Article

Nov
2

Registration Fees – California DMV

There are a variety of fees that may be required when applying for or renewing vehicle registration.

Determining Fees

Registration fees are based on:

  • Your vehicle type (auto, motorcycle, etc.).
  • Your vehicle’s purchase price or declared value.
  • Dates (for example, the date you purchased your vehicle, or the date your vehicle entered California).
  • The city and/or county you live in.
  • The city and/or county your business is based in.
  • The unladen or declared gross vehicle weight (GVW) and the number of axles your vehicle may have.
  • Any special license plates your vehicle may have.
  • Whether you have any unpaid parking violations or toll evasion bail.

You will likely have to pay the following fees if your vehicle is registered for on-highway use:

  • The registration fee
  • California Highway Patrol (CHP) fee
  • Vehicle license fee
  • Transportation improvement fee
  • County/district fee

DMV Fee Calculators

To help people plan for registration-related fees, DMV provides vehicle registration fee calculators.

These fee calculators can help you:

Your estimate will vary depending on the information you enter.

All fees may change depending on the law.

California Highway Patrol (CHP) Fees (CVC §§9250.8, 9250.13, 9552–9554)

CHP $27
CHP CVRA $45
Late penalties for original:
One year or less $30
More than one year up to (and including) two years $50
More than two years $100
Late penalties for renewal:
1 to 10 days $10
11 to 30 days $15
31 days up to (and including) one year $30
More than one year up to (and including) two years $50
More than two years $100

Information Request Fees (CVC §1811)

Electronic requests by license, ID, or CF number $2
Manual requests (walk-in, mail-in, telephone inquiries) $5
History fee (per year):
– Automated $5
– Non-automated $20
– Photocopy $20

Moped Fees (CVC §5036)

Duplicate ID card (CVC §9265) $22
Original moped $22
Substitute plate $22
Transfer $22

Miscellaneous Registration and Service Fees

Alternative Fuel/Technology Registration $3
Alternative Fuel/Technology Smog $8
CTIP (CVC §9400.1) $3
Clean air vehicle sticker (original/replacement) (CVC
 §§5205.5, 21655.9)
$22
County (CVC §§9250.2, 9250.7, 9250.10–9850.17) Varies by county
CVRA motor vehicle (CVC §9400.1) $122
CVRA weight/year stickers (original/replacement) (CVC §9400.1) $3
Dishonored check (CGC §6157) $30
Duplicate/Substitute: (CVC §9265)
– Title $22
– License plates $22
– Registration card $22
– Sticker $22
Engine change (CVC §9267) $2
Historical vessel plaque (CVC §9853.5) $20
Investigation service (CVC §9263) $15
Lien sale authorization (CCC §3071) $5
Motorcycle cross index (original) (CVC §9268) $1
Motorcycle safety (original/renewal) (CVC §2935) $2
Non-resident service (original from out-of-state) (CVC §9252) $22
Non-resident reregistration (same registration year) (CVC §9252) $22
Nonrepairable vehicle certificate (original/duplicate) (CVC §11515.2) $22
Ownership responsibility citation (CVC §40002.1) $7
Partial year registration (CVC §9702) $22
Photocopy of record (CVC §§1810–1811) $20
Planned nonoperation (PNO) 
(all vehicles/OHV) (CVC §4604)
$22
Prejudgment attachment filing or certificate (CCCP §§488.385(b)(c)) $22
Prior history (brands certificates prior junk, salvage, taxi, etc.) (CVC §9255.1) $2
Privately owned school bus (PSD) registration/licensing education related $22
Reflectorized license plate (CVC §4850) $1
Repossession (CVC §9255) $15