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Archive of posts published in the category: bicycle
Feb
22

List of bicycle brands and manufacturing companies

Wikimedia list article

This page lists notable bicycle brands and manufacturing companies past and present. This article relates to pedal cycles. tricycles and power assisted cycles but does not include Motorcycles. For bicycle parts, see List of bicycle part manufacturing companies.

Many bicycle brands do not manufacture their own product, but rather import and re-brand bikes manufactured by others (e.g., Nishiki), sometimes designing the bike, specifying the equipment, and providing quality control. There are also brands that have, at different times, been manufacturers as well as re-branders: a company with manufacturing capability may market models made by other (overseas) factories, while simultaneously manufacturing bicycles in-house, for example, high-end models.[1]

Only brands or manufacturers that are notable as a bicycle brand should be included. If no page exists for the company or brand, then the page to be linked to should be created first or a reference provided as to its notability or the entry will probably be removed.

International manufacturers[edit]

Bicycle manufacturers are in many cases members of “Groups”, i.e. they have several product names – so-called “brands”. Examples include the following:

  • Calcott Brothers – UK (defunct)
  • Calfee Design – United States
  • Caloi – Brazil
  • Campion Cycle Company – UK
  • Cannondale – an American division of Canadian conglomerate Dorel Industries
  • Canyon bicycles – Germany
  • Catrike – United States (Recumbent trikes)
  • CCM – Canada
  • Centurion – United States
  • Cervélo – Canada
  • Chappelli Cycles – Australia
  • Chater-Lea – UK
  • Chicago Bicycle Company – United States (defunct)
  • CHUMBA – United States
  • Cilo – Switzerland
  • Cinelli – Italy
  • Ciombola – Australia
  • Clark-Kent – United States (defunct)
  • Claud Butler – UK
  • Clément – France (defunct)
  • Co-Motion Cycles – United States
  • Coker – United States
  • Colnago – Italy road bike benders
  • Columbia Bicycles – United States
  • Corima – France
  • Cortina Cycles – United States
  • Coventry-Eagle – UK (defunct – see Falcon Cycles)
  • Cruzbike – United States, recumbent
  • Cube Bikes – Germany
  • Currys – UK, no longer makes bicycles
  • Cycle Force Group – United States
  • Cycles Devinci – Canada
  • Cycleuropa Group – Sweden, manufactures such brands as: Bianchi, Crescent, DBS, Everton, Gitane, Kildemoes, Legnano, Micmo, Monark, Puch, Spectra, and Cyclepro
  • Cyclops – Australia
  • Cyfac – France
  • Dahon – United States, China
  • Dario Pegoretti – Italy
  • Dawes Cycles – UK
  • Defiance Cycle Company – UK (defunct)
  • Demorest – United States (restructured as Lycoming Foundry and Machine Company and discontinued bicycle manufacturing)
  • Den Beste Sykkel (better known as DBS) – Norway
  • Derby Cycle – Germany, owns Kalkhoff, Focus, Nishiki, Rixe, Raleigh and Univega
  • De Rosa – Italy
  • Cycles Devinci – Canada (not to be confused with daVinci Designs of United States, who make tandems.)
  • Di Blasi Industriale – Italy
  • Diamant – Germany. Owned by Trek
  • Diamant – Norway
  • Diamondback Bicycles – United States
  • Dolan Bikes – UK
  • Dorel Industries – Canada, owns Pacific Cycle and markets under brand names including Cannondale, Iron Horse, Schwinn, Mongoose, Roadmaster, and GT
  • Dunelt – UK (defunct)
  • Dynacraft – United States, owns Magna and Next
  • Kalkhoff – Germany
  • Kangaroo –
Feb
13

Material challenges of bicycle manufacturing in a post-growth world

The idea of a world based on active transport, and on cycling in particular, is a recurring theme in thinking on degrowth. This was one of the proposed transformative paths of the Manifesto of the Mouvement québécois pour une décroissance conviviale[1] and this notion also plays an important role in the reflections of the Degrowth.info group, based in Germany[2]. The mainstream media also associate degrowth with cycling.[3]

Most degrowth advocates agree that the bicycle is a useful and desirable tool in a post-growth world, although some favour the promotion of walking.[4] One of the precursors of the philosophy of degrowth, Ivan Illich, describes the bicycle as the ecological machine par excellence:

The bicycle and the motor vehicle were invented by the same generation, but they are symbols of two opposing uses of modern advancement. […] It is a wonderful tool that takes full advantage of metabolic energy to speed up locomotion. On flat ground, the cyclist goes three or four times faster than the pedestrian, using five times less calories.[5]

French engineer Philippe Bihouix, for his part, sees it as an example of a low-tech machine, despite the relative technical complexity involved in  its manufacture. Even a simple model, he points out, contains several hundred technically complex basic parts, which are difficult to produce locally. The processes include metallurgy of alloys and different metals, the machining and fitting of parts, vulcanizing tire rubber, producing anti-corrosion paints, and grease for the chain. Once built, however, “it is clearly possible for ordinary people to fully understand how it works, to tinker with it […] to keep it in good condition for many years, not to say almost indefinitely”[6] (translation).

Some currents of degrowth stress the need for production at the local level, ideally through worker self-organization. These  ideas can be found in the writing of Yves-Marie Abraham, for example, who argues that the production of the basic necessities of life should no longer be undertaken by private enterprise or the State, but by communities organized according to the principles of self-production and sharing of the means of production.[7] As many other organizations, Polémos, an independent research group on degrowth based in Montreal, also advocates a form of work organization based on cooperative and commons-based production[8].

But what exactly is involved in the production and maintenance of a bicycle in terms of work organization, material and energy resources, as well as technical choices? This study looks at the form that bicycle production could take in a degrowth context and the dependencies that this mode of transportation  entails. It considers the concept of the bicycle workshop, a facility that is smaller and more user-friendly than a modern factory, and interrogates the tensions between the simplicity of manufacture to be achieved and the technical efficiency necessary for a light manufacturing process.

Why efficiency matters

The issue of efficiency may seem too focused on industry and productivity to be a legitimate concern as far as degrowth is concerned. The drive for efficiency is sometimes associated

Jan
22

Bicycle Health Reviews, Cost, Complaints

Bicycle Health Review

Bicycle Health is a treatment organization that specializes in the care of clients struggling with opioid use disorders. With nine locations from Los Angeles to San Francisco, Bicycle Health offers comprehensive medication-assisted treatment that integrates counseling with medications to treat opioids such as heroin, Fentanyl and Vicodin. Founded in 2018, the organization offers “telemedicine”, where modern technology enables physician consultations through video conferencing. Beyond the intake interview, individuals do not need to meet with team members in-person. Medication management is offered for clients in need of dual-diagnosis support for co-occurring physical and mental health conditions. The 12-step recovery model is also a component of the programming.

Treatment and Staff

Before beginning treatment clients undergo a comprehensive intake assessment that includes a physical and mental health exam as well as a complete history of substance use and withdrawal symptoms. From there, the Bicycle Health team determines the most effective individualized care strategy tailored to address the specific needs and goals of each client. The facility utilizes Suboxone and Subutex, FDA-approved medications that reduce painful opioid withdrawal symptoms and enable individuals to focus on recovery. In addition, Bicycle Health uses muscle relaxant medications when necessary. Methadone is not offered as it requires in-person visits. Clients can communicate with a physician or health coach through Bicycle Health’s app. There is no set treatment length. Individual needs dictate how long a client will require medication.

Bicycle Health employs an established team comprised of board-certified physicians, family and psychiatric nurse practitioners as well as health coaches. Many of the doctors specialize in preventative and family medicine. Medication management for co-occurring conditions is available as needed.

Extra 

Following the intake assessment, clients are no longer required to show up in-person. Prescriptions can be picked up personally, sent to a nearby pharmacy or even discreetly delivered to the client’s home. 

The Modesto location accepts Medicare.

In Summary

Bicycle Health is an organization that offers a comprehensive “telemedical” approach to care that remotely connects physicians with clients struggling with opioid use disorders. The facility places a premium on privacy and professional, individualized care. For anyone seeking a discrete medication-assisted program with an excellent team of physicians and nurses, Bicycle Health is an excellent resource. 

Bicycle Health Location

San Francisco
350 Townsend St, Ste 309
San Francisco, CA, 94107.

Redwood City
617 Veterans Blvd Ste 101,
Redwood City, CA, 94063.

Modesto
931 10th St,
Modesto, CA 95354.

Fresno
2721 Ventura St Ste 130
Fresno, CA, 93721.

Pasadena
547 South Marengo Avenue,
Pasadena, CA 91101

Culver City
9415 Culver Blvd,
Culver City, CA 90232

Santa Monica
929 Colorado Ave,
Santa Monica, CA 90401

Long Beach
431 E Broadway,
Long Beach, CA 90802

San Fernando Valley
9410 Owensmouth Ave,
Chatsworth, CA 91311

Bicycle Health Cost

$199/Month (Insurance accepted). Reach Bicycle Health by phone at (866) 400-1559 or by email. Follow Bicycle Health on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram

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Dec
27

You Got a Bicycle, Now You Have to Take Care of It

If you don’t plan on riding during the winter, or if you plan on only riding infrequently, be sure to remove lights, water bottles and GPS cycling computers, particularly if the bike will be kept in a shared storage area or cold garage. Clean your water bottles and let them dry completely before storing them so that old water, debris, or energy powder mix don’t convert into mold and bacteria. To help prevent rust and corrosion, make sure your chain is lubricated with bicycle-specific lube or wax.

Jeff Underwood, founder of Continuum Cycles and CC Cyclery in the East Village, suggested scheduling an annual tuneup before storing your bike for the winter. “Not only will this put you ahead of the majority of riders who have to deal with the long wait times in the spring, this also helps out your smaller neighborhood bike shop by giving them business in the off-season.”

If you choose not to get a tuneup, or if your bike just doesn’t need one yet, Mr. Underwood said to make sure the chain was lubricated correctly and that there was proper pressure in the tires before storing the bike. “When air slowly releases over time,” he said, “the weight of the bicycle can cause the tires to become misshapen.”

For cyclists who do expect to ride in the winter, Anna Maria Wolf, the owner of Sun and Air and King Kog bike shops in Williamsburg, Brooklyn, also suggested getting a bike tuneup to avoid any mechanical issues when it’s cold and dark and you’re away from home.

“Be sure to wash the salt and sand off your drivetrain (the chain ring, chain, cassette (gears), and derailleur) after riding, then re-lubricate the parts to keep them in good shape.”

She advised putting old newspapers down in your hallway when cleaning your bike. Old newspapers or flattened cardboard boxes are also great at collecting any dirty water or grease that may drip down off your bike after riding in the rain or snow.

When I first began riding, I never imagined riding during the winter. As the weather gradually got colder, however, my body adjusted to it and I learned which clothes to wear at different temperatures. Come January, I even asked my local bike shop to swap out my skinny tires for rugged tires suitable for riding in the snow. As the adage goes, there’s no such thing as bad weather, only bad gear.

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Dec
26

Bicycle theft on the rise in Boulder County

In the time it took to purchase a sandwich from a shop in downtown Boulder, Nancy Trigg’s bike was cut from its lock and stolen.

The Boulder resident ultimately found the bicycle at an alleged chop shop and was able to retrieve it with the help of the Boulder Police Department. It wasn’t registered, Trigg said, but she had photographs of a large dent on the bicycle that helped confirm it was hers. She’s since placed a sticker reading “Please don’t steal my bicycle. Thanks.” over the dent.

Nancy Trigg poses with her bike, which was stolen and returned earlier this year. (Eddie Clark/Courtesy photo)

While bicycle theft is not a new phenomenon, Trigg noted that something about it feels different.

“What’s different now is it’s blatant,” she said.

Indeed, bicycle theft is on the rise across Boulder County. Both Boulder and Longmont reported an increase in the past year. In Boulder, more than 1,000 bicycles valued at about $1.9 million have been stolen in 2020 from individuals and bicycle shops. In years past, the city reported an average of 700 bikes stolen annually.

Travel east to Longmont, and the story is similar. According to Longmont Police Sgt. Matt Cage, 211 bicycles have been reported stolen this year, an almost 10% increase from the year prior.

“Most property crimes are up all across the state, including Longmont,” Cage wrote in an email.

Although people self-report the value of their bike when it’s stolen, the Boulder Police Department said the average value of each stolen bicycle is more than $1,000. The figures extend through early December.

“Stolen bicycles are a chronic problem here in the city of Boulder,” Boulder Police Strategic Data and Policy Advisor Beth Christenson said in a Dec. 10 town hall meeting.

As such, the department has begun a targeted effort to combat the problem by teaming up with Bike Index, a nonprofit that helps people register their bicycles. The free service helps law enforcement locate and contact people who own a stolen bike that’s found.

“If your bike is stolen and you have registered it and it is found outside the jurisdiction, other agencies can quickly find where the bike is from and who it is registered to,” Christenson said.

Bryan Hance, co-founder of Bike Index, said he helped start the nonprofit organization when he realized that it made sense to have a central place for bike shops and cyclists to go to register bikes and search for stolen ones.

Marketplace in August reported that the disrupted supply chain led to a bicycle shortage. Hance referenced that shortage and other impacts of the coronavirus as some of the reasons for the rise in theft.

“It’s been a really busy year for bike thieves,” he said.

People often send the Boulder Police Department photos and videos of suspected bicycle chop shops, or places where stolen bikes are taken apart so parts can be sold or used on other stolen bikes. However, spokesperson Dionne Waugh said it’s difficult to

Dec
12

California Bicycle Laws – CalBike

The California Vehicle Code contains the state laws that specify where and how bikes must operate. For the most part, bicyclists have the same rights and responsibilities as motor vehicle drivers. (CVC 21200).

There are some specific rules. Below, for your benefit, we summarize the key sections of the law that relate to cycling.

WHERE YOU CAN RIDE

If you’re moving as fast as traffic, you can ride wherever you want.

If you’re moving slower than traffic, you can “take the lane” if it’s not wide enough for a bike and a vehicle to safely share side-by-side. The law says that people who ride bikes must ride as close to the right side of the road as practicable except under the following conditions: when passing, preparing for a left turn, avoiding hazards, if the lane is too narrow to share, or if approaching a place where a right turn is authorized. (CVC 21202) Unfortunately, some motorists and even police don’t understand cyclists’ right to “take the lane.” If you have a legal problem based on this understanding, consider calling one of the bike-friendly lawyers we identify on our “Crash Help” page.

Use the bicycle lane. On a roadway with a bike lane, bicyclists traveling slower than traffic must use the bike lane except when making a left turn, passing, avoiding hazardous conditions, or approaching a place where a right turn is authorized. CVC 21208

You don’t have to use the “protected bike lane.” Once a bike lane is separated from moving traffic with posts or car parking or anything else, it’s no longer a “bike lane” according to the law; it’s a “separated bikeway.” CVC 21208 does not apply. You may ride outside of the separated bikeway for any reason. (SHC 890.4d)

Ride with traffic. Bicyclists must travel on the right side of the roadway in the direction of traffic, except when passing, making a legal left turn, riding on a one-way street, riding on a road that is too narrow, or when the right side of the road is closed due to road construction. CVC 21650

Mopeds and high-speed electric bikes are not like regular bikes. Gas-powered bicycles and type 3 electric bicycles (with top assisted speeds of 28 mph) may not be used on trails or bike paths or lanes unless allowed by local authorities. They may be used in bike lanes or separated bikeways adjacent to the roadway. CVC 21207.5  They require helmets and may not be operated by people under age 16.

Low-speed electric bicycles are almost like regular bikes. Type 1 and 2 electric bicycles (with top assisted speeds of 20 mph) are allowed wherever regular bikes are allowed unless a sign specifically prohibits electric bicycles.

Bike path obstruction: No one may stop on or park a bicycle on a bicycle path. CVC 21211

SidewalksIndividual cities and counties control whether bicyclists may ride on sidewalks.  CVC 21206

FreewaysBicycles (including motorized bicycles) may not be ridden on freeways and expressways where doing

Dec
10

The Bicycle Hotel & Casino

The Bicycle Hotel & Casino
The Bicycle Hotel & Casino Logo.jpg
Address 888 Bicycle Casino Drive
Bell Gardens, California 90201
Opening date November 30, 1984
Casino type Land
Previous names The Bicycle Casino
Renovated in 2015 (Hotel Addition)
Website www.thebike.com

The Bicycle Hotel & Casino (commonly, “The Bike“) is a poker cardroom in California.[1]

Founded by George Hardie Sr. in 1984, located in Bell Gardens, California, The Bicycle Casino offers a selection of poker games and Asian games, with a wide range of limits. The casino features games including: Blackjack, Texas Hold ‘Em, Seven Card Stud, Omaha hold ’em, Mexican Poker, Pai Gow Poker, Three Card Poker and Baccarat (card game).

Financing to build the original Bicycle Club casino was provided by Sam Gilbert, who allegedly used money partially obtained from laundering drug money.[2]
The casino is home to the Legends of Poker, a tournament series established in 1995 that now includes a stop on the World Poker Tour. Prior to the Legends, the casino’s main tournament series was called the Diamond Jim Brady.[3]

Seizure and indictment[edit]

In 1987, Sam Gilbert was the subject of a federal investigation into money laundering and racketeering charges. According to the investigation, a scheme to launder the money received from smuggling marijuana was put together to finance the construction of the Bicycle Casino in Bell Gardens, California.[2][4] According to one criminal complaint,

“[Sam Gilbert] a wealthy Los Angeles businessman, was the first Gilbert to establish ties with the Kramer family when he befriended Benjamin Kramer’s father, Jack Kramer, in 1978. At that time, Jack Kramer and Sam Gilbert came up with the idea of building a legal card club for the purposes of laundering Benjamin Kramer’s dirty money. By 1983, Sam Gilbert was in contact with David Pierson, who was himself thinking of building a card club and was looking for legitimate investors. Pierson gave Sam Gilbert a prospectus, Sam liked what he saw, and Sam agreed to arrange the financing for the project in return for a sixty percent share of Pierson’s ownership interest in the Club.”[5]

Gilbert was indicted in Miami 4 days after his death.[6] His son Michael also was indicted.

The U.S. Government seized the casino in April, 1990, after a jury found that $12 million of the $22 million used in its construction came from Florida drug smugglers.[7] The club’s profits were frozen and placed in a special U.S. Marshals account until the court held a civil hearing to determine which partners knew that the club was built with drug money.

George Hardie and The Park Place Associates ownership were exonerated in 1990, and they regained their 35% stake.[8]

In July 1991 a Florida federal judge ruled that at least one of the partners, former Los Angeles Westside banker M. Dale Lyon, knew about the club’s financing. Eight other partners in the LCP Associates, the partnership named for Lyon, Coyne and Pierson, agreed to forfeit portions of their interest

Nov
18

Bicycle ride to highlight historic Route 66, downtown Edmond

EDMOND — The inaugural Cycle 66, an urban and rural bicycling tour and festival along historic Route 66, will be Nov. 7, 2021, with diverse cycling routes showcasing the Mother Road’s uniqueness via starting and finishing lines in downtown Edmond.

“Oklahoma’s love of cycling, Route 66 and family fun all comes together with Cycle 66,” said Cycle 66 founder Mike Osburn, an Edmond businessman and civic booster. “Whether you’re a competitive cyclist, started biking as a pandemic distraction, or just like fun and food, Cycle 66 is for you. We are thrilled Edmond is getting in on the action of Route 66, a national attraction we are privileged to have as a part of our community.”

Organizers unveiled Cycle 66 on the 94th anniversary of Route 66’s establishment in 1926. Cycle 66’s title sponsor is OU Health.

“Cycle 66 offers cyclists three distances to enjoy and the rest of us a chance to cheer them on at a family friendly festival showcasing all downtown Edmond has to offer,” said Jennifer Seaton, director of Visit Edmond.

“Oklahoma is leading the nation in Route 66 tourism as the Mother Road approaches its 100th anniversary, and dynamic events like Cycle 66 are one reason why,” said Oklahoma Lt. Gov. Matt Pinnell, the state’s secretary of tourism and branding.

“Cycle 66 is a dream for people like me who love cycling, cherish Route 66 and believe in Oklahoma’s potential as a recreation and tourism destination,” said Pinnell, an avid cyclist.

Cycle 66 will offer routes for all riders, from amateur to competitive cyclists. All three routes will include support and gear, relief wagons, signage, rest stops, first aid stations and traffic control.

The routes will include:

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Nov
18

Carlsbad Boulevard to become part of national bicycle route

Carlsbad Boulevard, the nearly seven-mile stretch of road also known as old Highway 101 through Carlsbad, is about to get a third designation — U.S. Bicycle Route 95.

The recognition would make Carlsbad Boulevard part of a national network of routes intended to facilitate interstate travel by bicycle on roads and highways identified as suitable for cycling.

“Just like the interstate highway system, there is a U.S. bicycle route system,” said Kerry Irons of the Adventure Cycling Association. “It’s in the relatively early stage of development.”

Carlsbad will be the last city in San Diego County to approve the designation, Irons said. About 75 percent of the 1,000-mile route has been established from the California-Oregon border to the U.S. border with Mexico. Eventually, plans call for U.S. Bicycle Route 95 to extend to the Canadian border.

“The target audience here is long-distance travelers,” he said. Usually they are people who travel in small groups on bikes loaded with equipment, and who stop at motels or campsites along the way.

“It’s not perfect,” he said of the bike-route system. “If you want to ride the entire California coast, you are going to hit construction … there are places where traffic is heavy … and sometimes there are rough or sandy roads and people with dogs on leashes.”

East-West routes in the works include U.S. Route 50 from San Francisco through South Lake Tahoe and on through Nevada and Utah, and Route 66, which goes from Los Angeles through parts of Arizona and New Mexico.

The American Association of State Highways and Transportation Officials created the U.S. Bicycle Route System in the early 1980s. So far there are designated bicycle routes in 24 states, used for cross-country travel, regional touring and commuting.

“Bicycle tourism is a growing industry in North America,” Carlsbad Mayor Matt Hall said in a letter to Caltrans supporting the designation. “As a community, we stand to benefit from this opportunity both economically and from the health and environmental related benefits of encouraging bicycle travel in our region.”

The Carlsbad City Council is expected to approve a resolution authorizing the designation at its meeting Tuesday.

Cities that agree to the designation are not required to take any additional action. No additional route markings, such as signs or bike lane markings, are required.

Groups such as the Adventure Cycling Association and the California Bicycle Coalition publish maps of the routes.

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Oct
18

Best 17 Bicycle Repair in Halstead, KS with Reviews

YP – The Real Yellow PagesSM – helps you find the right local businesses to meet your specific needs. Search results are sorted by a combination of factors to give you a set of choices in response to your search criteria. These factors are similar to those you might use to determine which business to select from a local Yellow Pages directory, including proximity to where you are searching, expertise in the specific services or products you need, and comprehensive business information to help evaluate a business’s suitability for you. “Preferred” listings, or those with featured website buttons, indicate YP advertisers who directly provide information about their businesses to help consumers make more informed buying decisions. YP advertisers receive higher placement in the default ordering of search results and may appear in sponsored listings on the top, side, or bottom of the search results page.

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