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Archive of posts published in the category: bicycle
Apr
4

Speed’s Bicycle Shop (Sparta) – 2020 All You Need to Know BEFORE You Go (with Photos)

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Apr
4

Bicycle Laws – FindLaw

As with traffic laws in general, bicycle laws are enforced at the state and local levels. But while bicyclists generally are expected to follow the same traffic laws that apply to motorists, most jurisdictions also have laws that are specific to those operating bicycles on public thoroughfares. State laws and local ordinances also typically include bicycle helmet provisions, rules against riding a bike on the sidewalk, biking while under the influence and other bicycle-specific rules.

Some local bicycle ordinances have been criticized for making bikers (and pedestrians) less safe, such as requirements that bicyclists ride on the sidewalk or walk their bikes across intersections. Since bicycle laws can be different from one municipality to another, and not always intuitive, bicyclists should familiarize themselves with laws along regularly traveled routes. Read on to learn more about how bicycle laws work. 

Traffic violations incurred while riding a bicycle are handled just the same as for a moving violation involving an automobile. The ticket should indicate whether the violation involved a bicycle and will not affect your automobile insurance.

Common Bicycle Traffic Rules

Signaling

While some bicycles are equipped with turn signals, bicyclists are required to use the proper hand signals when turning, changing lanes or stopping. Failure to signal while biking in traffic can result in a traffic citation:

  • Right Turn / Lane Change: Right hand extended straight out
  • Left Turn / Lane Change: Right hand bent upward 90 degrees at the elbow
  • Stop: Right hand bent downward 90 degrees at the elbow

Helmet Laws

Most states and the District of Columbia require the use of bicycle helmets to some degree, often for children under the age of 16 or 18. And while there are no state laws requiring helmets for bicyclists all ages, many local ordinances do. Washington state, for example, has no state law addressing the use of helmets at all but many of its cities (including Seattle) require bicyclists of all ages to wear helmets.

Lights and Reflectors

In virtually every state, bicyclists are required to have red lights on the back and white lights on the front, as well as white reflectors on the front and red reflectors on the back. Details vary with respect to individual state and local laws.

Riding on Sidewalks

Most state and local ordinances prohibit bicyclists over a certain age (13 in San Francisco, for example) from biking on sidewalks, although bikers must always yield to pedestrians. However, some local ordinances allow bicycling on sidewalks and even prohibit bikes on certain streets.

Running a Stop Sign or Stoplight

As with motorists, bicyclists may not ride through a stop sign or stoplight without stopping completely first. Bikes move slowly (compared to automobiles) and so it may not seem practical to come to a complete stop–especially if stopping uphill–but failing to do so could result in a citation.

State Bicycle Laws

The California Vehicle Code Section

Apr
4

Bicycle Safety

Bicycle Safety Introduction

Bicycling is a common means of transportation as well as an increasingly popular source of recreation, exercise, and sport. With more than 100 million bicycle owners, the popularity of bicycling has reached an all-time high.

Along with increased use of bicycles comes the risk of significant injuries. According to national statistics, more than 1.8 billion bicycle outings occur each year, resulting in nearly 494,000 visits to emergency departments. Injuries related to bicycling range from common abrasions, cuts, and bruises to broken bones, internal injuries, head trauma, and even death.

More than 900 bicyclists die annually, and 20,000 are admitted to hospitals. From a statistical standpoint, bicycle riding has a higher death rate per trip or per mile of travel than being a passenger in an automobile. The majority of bicycle deaths are caused by head injuries.

The most common cause of bicycle crashes are falls or collisions with stationary objects.


Principles of Bicycle Safety

 

The best preparation for safe bicycle riding is proper training. Common resources for training include an experienced rider, parent, or community program. Often, however, initial training involves simple instruction from parents on balance and pedaling.

Proper supervision of younger riders is a must . In fact, it is recommended that younger children ride only in enclosed areas.

Early investment in safety equipment such as protective clothing and a helmet can prevent a significant number of injuries. Proper equipment safety preparation include:

  • Helmets – Extremely important
  • Reflective clothing for nighttime or low-visibility conditions
  • Bicycle safety equipment (reflectors on frame and wheels)
  • Proper bicycle selection
  • Proper bicycle maintenance

Consider these ideas to help further reduce the risk of a bicycle accident.

  • A bicycle should only be used in a way that’s appropriate for the age of the rider.
  • A bicycle rider needs to have the proper experience and skill before riding on public roads.
  • Less experienced bicyclists should learn the rules of the road.
  • Both bicyclists and motorists need to understand how to safely and courteously share the road.
  • Both motorist and bicyclist need to observe the proper speed limits, yield right-of-way, not drive while drinking.
  • Bicyclists need to be aware of their surroundings. Watch for opening car doors, sewer grating, debris on the roads, uneven surfaces, and poorly lit areas.

Continued

Obeying traffic rules can help ensure safe travel.

  • Cyclists need to follow the same rules as motorists.
  • Always use correct hand signals before turning.
  • Ride in single file with traffic, not against it.

Use these guidelines to increase cycling safety:

  • Avoid major roads and sidewalks.
  • Announce your presence (“On your left”) on bike and walking trails as you come up behind and pass pedestrians and other riders.

Enforcement and legislation can increase bicycle safety. Promote safety by supporting:

  • The mandated use of protective devices (helmets, reflectors)
  • Bicycle-friendly community and community planning, for
Apr
4

Bergerwerke Bicycle

Bergerwerke Bicycle, LLC is a small full-service bicycle maintenance and repair shop located in Antigo, Wisconsin. We offer full service maintenance plans and have a variety of both new and used bikes for sale. We also restore all types of vintage and nostalgic bicycles and specialize in the recreation of the Model G519 1940s military bicycle, originally produced for the U.S. Armed Forces during the Second World War. We are proud to say we are the…

Alan R. Berger, proprietor of Bergerwerke Bicycle, has extensive knowledge of bicycles, all types of military vehicles and historical artifacts and antiques. In addition, he has over 29 years of professional experience in the bicycle industry in the fields of bicycle mechanics and development and is a true artisan in creative fabrication and artifact restoration! 

Bergerwerke (pronounced ber-ger-ver-ka) supplies both restored and reproduction vintage bicycles to the Motion Picture Film Industry and Public and Private Museums. These authentic restorations can be seen in various museums, “Living History” demonstrations, and even in Hollywood! Bergerwerke Bicycle is open to the public and we invite you to stop by and see us. For more information on our shop and the sales and services we provide, visit the local services page.

 

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Apr
4

Bicycle Clothing At Its Best–and Our Bicycle Clothing Is MADE IN OREGON!

 


Bicycle Clothing is the Most Critical of All Bicycle Accessories!




Bicycle clothing is what makes or breaks the bicycling experience. It determines if you’re comfortable while riding, and therefore happy! Your bicycle clothing keeps you warm, dry, well padded, and safe.

We have cycling apparel that breathes, keeps you dry, has Velcro for convenience, and 3M-brand reflective elements for safety. We have bike shorts that have padding where it’s most critical, and bicycle jerseys and other garments that have extra room where it’s needed most. We designed our bicycle clothing thoughtfully; and we take bicycling, bicycle clothing and bicycle accessories very seriously. We make sure that the clothes are perfectly optimized for comfort and function, taking into consideration fit, padding, dryness, breathability, and safety. We make sure that our cycling apparel is perfect for ourselves, and only then will we sell it to you, our customer.

Oregon, with its four seasons, is the perfect testing environment for bicycle clothing of all types. And we not only make the best bicycle clothing around, we also do custom orders! Our site’s aim isn’t merely to wish you happy biking, but to help you make that wish come true! !

Click on any of the cycling apparel pictures you see to the right, or use the menus to access the product information pages.

If you’re looking for any of the following, this is the site for you: bicycle clothing closeouts, bicycle jerseys, bicycle patrol uniform, bicycle rain cape, bicycle rain gear, bicycle shorts, bike shorts, breathable rainsuit, Cordura jackets, cycling jackets, cycling shorts, discounted cycling clothes, helmet cover, Lycra shorts, mountain bike jerseys, mountain biking apparel, police apparel, police bicycle gear, police rainwear, rain gear, rain jackets, rain wear, rainwear, ranger jacket, road bicycle accessories, street bike accessories, waterproof jackets, waterproof leggings, waterproof pants, wholesale jerseys, wind jacket, wind pants, womens rain jackets. We have backpacking shorts, clothes made with breathable nylon or Lycra or Supplex or Taslan or Wickaway, our Coolmax jersey, fire patrol clothing, leg bands, Velcro features, park ranger jackets, unisex clothing, and even custom clothing and clothes for any type of patrol officer.

“Choose technical garb that can pass as street wear, such as Jackson & Gibbens Touring shorts.”

—National Geographic Adventure Magazine: “The Essentials, No. 4, Bike Touring” by Robert Earle Howells, September 2003, page 26.

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Apr
4

Bicycle Tree

The “tree that ate a bicycle” on Washington’s Vashon Island has been a popular destination for curiosity seekers for years, particularly for those who have read Berkeley Breathed’s 1994 book, Red Ranger Came Calling, which was inspired by this arboreal oddity.

Many photographs of the bicycle tree can be found on the Internet on sites such as RoadsideAmerica, and a trek to the site is captured in the following video:

Pictures of the bicycle are commonly associated with text claiming it was left chained to a tree by a boy who went off to war in 1914

A boy left his bike chained to a tree when he went away to war in 1914. He never returned, leaving the tree no choice but to grow around the bike. Incredible that this bike has been there for 98 years now!


However, the bicycle is not nearly that old, nor was it left behind by a young man setting off to take part in World War I. According to the Vashon-Maury Island Beachcomber, the bicycle was left behind in the mid-1950s by a local resident who simply abandoned it:

Tales abound explaining how a red bicycle came to be lodged in a Vashon tree a dozen feet up

Some say it ended up there by chance, while others contend in was intentional cleverness. One former Islander, Berkeley Breathed, even wrote a children’s book about the mystery.

But one longtime Island family had laid a solid claim to the bicycle in a tree just north of Sound Food. Two generations concur that the bicycle belonged to Don Puz, who in 1954 left his bicycle in the woods, forgot about it and never went back looking for it.

Don received the bicycle as a donation after the family home burnt down, he said.

The bicycle wasn’t his favorite — it had hard, solid rubber tires “and skinny little handlebars like a tricycle,” he said. “I was too big a kid to ride it.”

As his mother Helen Puz tells the story, Don and his friends were playing in the woods together, and Don was the only child who had ridden his bicycle there. When the boys left, Don left his bike behind, walking home with the other boys.

“Apparently, he wasn’t too excited about that bike,” she said.

After the bike was discovered, making headlines, both mother and son paid it a visit.

“We went down there in the woods, and there was this bike in the tree, and I said, ‘That’s my bike,’” Don recalled. “I recognized it immediately. When I saw that bike, I recognized it, because I don’t think I’ve ever seen another one like it.”

Although Don Puz identified the bicycle in the picture as his and verified that he had abandoned it in the area shown many years earlier, he said nothing about having left it chained to a tree. And given the location of the bike within the tree and the manner in which trees actually

Apr
4

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Apr
4

Bicycle Adventures – Worldwide Group Bike Tours & Cycling Vacations

Why Bicycle Adventures

We invite you to join our family. After 35 years of guiding extraordinary bicycle vacations, we have learned that bigger is not better. How do we know that? Easy… Our guests and guides tell us so. It’s the little things that small tours do that just aren’t possible with large group tours. Whether it’s getting to know everyone through shared a conversation at dinner, choosing your dinner off the menu, staying in boutique accommodations or having your favorite post-ride refreshment waiting for you at the end of the day. But the best part is having guides that actually get to know you so that each trip feels like your own personalized vacation.

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Apr
3

The Beginner’s Guide to Picking the Perfect Bicycle

Illustration for article titled The Beginners Guide to Picking the Perfect Bicycle

Illustration: Sam Woolley

I had always been a bike purist. Up until recently, I’ve been riding the same bike I got for my 10th birthday. Sure, it still got me where I needed to go, but it was definitely time for an upgrade. As a total beginner, I discovered picking the right bike isn’t as simple as I thought. From frame size to extra features, here’s how to find your perfect ride.

Choose the right bike type based on your needs

When I walked into my local bike shop and they asked what I was looking for, I had no idea what to say beyond, “a really cool bike.” I didn’t know where to start, so I told them I just wanted something for riding around the neighborhood. Even then, I discovered there were options.

The National Bicycle Dealers Association (NBDA) lists the general types of bikes you can find at most stores here. You probably know the difference between a mountain bike and a cruiser (pictured above), but there are a few types in between. Here’s a quick breakdown:

  • Mountain bikes: Rugged and meant for off-road use, but you can use them on pavement, too.
  • Road bikes: Meant for pavement use, like riding around in the city. Built for speed.
  • Hybrid bikes: A cross between mountain and road bikes. Not as fast as road bikes, and not as rugged as mountain bikes, but good for commuting.
  • Cruisers: Casual bike for, you know, cruising. The kind of bikes you see people ride around boardwalks near the beach.

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This infographic also does an excellent job of breaking down the different bike types for beginners. Of course, there are all sorts of additional, specific types of bikes: tandem bikes, BMX bikes, fixed-gear bikes. But for us beginners, these four are a good place to start. I wanted a good transportation bike, but maybe even one I could take on nearby trails, so the salesman suggested a hybrid.

Calculate how much you want to spend

It goes without saying that bikes can be expensive. Those prices range quite a bit, though, from a hundred bucks to several thousand depending on what you buy. Ebicycles.com says beginners can expect to at least spend a few hundred bucks, and CostHelper breaks down the price points (emphasis ours🙂

  • The low range is $80 to $300. Usually these basic metal frames are just functional, though often still stylish. Target sells low-range models by numerous brands, including Huffy and Forge.
  • Mid-range bikes cost $300 to $1,000. These aluminum or lighter metal bikes are the best bet for everyday riders because their higher-quality wheels, chains and pedals increase their durability.
  • High-end bikes cost $1,000 and higher. These models are usually made of the lightest metals, including carbon and titanium, and are designed for more rigorous, everyday use or light competition. Riders can build their own model in a store or online
Apr
3

How to Ride a Bicycle (with Pictures)

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To learn to ride a bicycle, first find a flat, open area that’s far from traffic. Put on a helmet in case you fall, and consider wearing knee and elbow pads when you’re first learning. Place your bike on a flat surface, and adjust the seat so both of your feet can touch the ground while you’re seated. Before you try riding your bike, walk next to it and practice pressing on the brakes until you get a feel for how they work. Then, sit on your bike, place one foot on one of the pedals, and place your other foot on the ground. When you’re ready, push off with your foot that’s on the ground, and see how long you can glide on your bike without pedaling. Keep your eyes forward and look toward where you want to go, which will help you balance. If you feel yourself starting to tip, place your foot back on the ground to catch yourself. Keep doing this until you’re comfortable balancing on your bike. Then, do the same thing again, but this time start pedaling with your feet. Continue pedaling and steering in the direction you want to go. The faster you pedal, the easier it will be to balance. If you need to come to a stop, stop pedaling and press down on the brakes. Consider asking a friend to spot you as you practice pedaling farther distances! Keep reading to learn how to ride your bike on a slope!

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