Category Archives

Archive of posts published in the category: transportation
Apr
2

Transportation :: Andrews University

 

NOTICE: as of March 19, 2020:

The office is currently closed for walk-in traffic, however you may still call or email the office.

NOTICE: as of March 23, 2020

We will no longer be transporting people to or from the local transportation centers. 

 

Office Hours: Monday – Thursday 9am to 12pm & 1pm to 5pm & Friday 9am to 11:30am.

 

NOTICE: As of August 1, 2017, the late reservation charges will be applied as noted on each reservation request form.

All reservation request forms must be submitted electronically. Reservation request forms not submitted electronically will be charged a $25.00 handling fee.


Vehicle / Bus Reservations


All reservation forms that are submitted during non-business hours will not be acknowledged until the next business day.


Please complete the vehicle or bus reservation forms online.


All students and non-participating faculty/staff going on a Day Trip must fill out the Hold Harmless Agreement (which your department will need to keep on file for three years).


We no longer accept reservations by phone/fax or in person.


In order to better serve you or your department’s transportation needs, we require you to submit a reservation form by email to our office no less than two full business days prior to your trip.  ALL reservations that are submitted less than two full business days (not including Fridays) before your travel date will be charged our late reservation fee.


A reservation form must be completed before submitting, once its successfully submitted then you will receive an acknowledgement of your request.


Any trip that involves multiple stops will require an attached detailed itinerary.


Personal Transportation Reservations


All reservation forms that are submitted during non-business hours will not be acknowledged until the next business day.


The Office of Transportation will no longer accept personal transportation reservations by phone or in person. You will need to submit the appropriate form by email.


ALL reservations that are submitted less than two full business days (not including Fridays) before your travel date will be charged our late reservation fee of $20.00.


Service to and from the following locations can be requested by enrolled students, faculty/staff, and guests of the university.


If you are arriving from any of the locations that we service, you will need to fill out the Arrival Reservation Form.

If you are departing from any of the locations that we service, you will need to fill out the Departure Reservation Form.


We service the following locations:


We charge $35.00 per person per one way to the South Bend Locations

South Bend Airport (Flights)

South Shore Train (South Bend Airport)

South Bend Greyhound Station

South Bend Amtrak


We charge $30.00 per person per one way to the Niles & Benton Harbor Locations

Niles Amtrak

Benton Harbor Bus (Greyhound / Indian Trails)



Policies:

1. To allow Transportation employees to observe Sabbath, service to any location is

Apr
2

Home – Sound Generations


Transportation Concepts
is the
public transportation division of Parking Concepts, a California
Corporation, with corporate offices in Irvine, California.  Gill
Barnett, President and owner of Parking Concepts, founded the
company in 1974 in order to provide an enhanced level of
customer service to an industry that had been sorely lacking in
customer service. Today, Parking Concepts is one of the most
successful and respected parking facility operators in the
United States.


Transportation Concepts
is a
company that has built a culture around a “total commitment”
philosophy. This ability is the result of the family like
environment provided to the employees of Transportation
Concepts.  We pride ourselves on a solid support structure and
the commitment we make to our employees and customers.  This
commitment is apparent in our performance. We are the ONLY
Company of this size with this level of experience in the market
place.  Transportation Concepts is very selective in the
opportunities that we pursue as it is imperative that we are
able to effectively manage our business and maintain focus. 


In 1982, Parking Concepts
was
awarded a shuttle bus contract at the Ontario International
Airport.  It was at that time that Transportation Concepts was
formed. To this day Parking Concepts (Transportation Concepts)
has continuously operated shuttle bus service at the Ontario
International Airport, either for the Airport or for Sunrise
Parking.


In 1999, Transportation Concepts

began establishing itself as a company that “does what it
says”.  Many outstanding managers joined the TC team.  These
individuals had been waiting for a private transportation firm
that took care of their clients, customers and employees in a
consistent manner. 


Throughout the past 24 years,
Transportation Concepts
has built its’ own
outstanding reputation as a customer centered, quality provider
of contracted transportation services.  A foundation of the
company’s success is a dedication to the goal to consistently
meet and exceed clients’ expectations.

 Transportation Concepts is a division
of
 

Source Article

Apr
2

Long Distance Medical Transport Services

Long Distance Patient Transport Services

ACC Medlink is the premier nationwide medical transportation company. We offer state to state patient transport for non emergency situations. Unlike typical ambulance transportation service, ACC Medlink’s long distance medical transport vehicles are specially configured for comfort. Patients who can not walk or sit up for extended periods, will find extreme comfort in our services. If your destination is more than 200 miles away—we are the safest and most cost effective choice available.

Luxury, Comfort & Safety

Our long distance medical vans are fully equipped to meet needs and ensure the most comfortable ride. Whether restricted to a bed or able to sit up, our staff will make the necessary accommodations. We can even accommodate several family members or a pet to feel comfortable every step of the way. Our Mercedes Sprinter fleet are the only DOT approved vehicles in the entire industry for this type of transport.

Relax, We Will Take Care of Everything

All it takes is one call and everything will be taken care of. Our transport coordinators are standing by 24/7 waiting to assist you with your long distance medical transport needs. You can rest assured that your loved one is receiving the top level of care. If you have any questions, give us a call at 1-800-550-1025.

Common Departure and Destination Sites:

  • Private Residences
  • Rehabilitation Centers
  • Assisted Living Facilities
  • Nursing Homes
  • Cancer Treatment Centers
  • Hospitals & Hospice Care
  • Alabama – AL
  • Arizona – AZ
  • Arkansas – AR
  • California – CA
  • Colorado – CO
  • Connecticut -CT
  • Delaware – DE
  • Florida – FL
  • Georgia – GA
  • Idaho – ID
  • Illinois – IL
  • Indiana – IN
  • Iowa – IA
  • Kansas – KS
  • Kentucky – KY
  • Louisiana – LA
  • Maine – ME
  • Maryland – MD
  • Massachusetts – MA
  • Michigan – MI
  • Minnesota – MN
  • Mississippi – MS
  • Missouri – MO
  • Montana – MT
  • Nebraska – NE
  • Nevada – NV
  • New Hampshire – NH
  • New Jersey – NJ
  • New Mexico – NM
  • New York – NY
  • North Carolina – NC
  • North Dakota – ND
  • Ohio – OH
  • Oklahoma – OK
  • Oregon – OR
  • Pennsylvania – PA
  • Rhode Island – RI
  • South Carolina – SC
  • South Dakota – SD
  • Tennessee – TN
  • Texas – TX
  • Utah – UT
  • Vermont – VT
  • Virginia – VA
  • Washington – WA
  • West Virginia – WV
  • Wisconsin – WI
  • Wyoming – WY

Source Article

Apr
2

Transportation Programs

School boards of community consolidated districts, community unit districts, consolidated districts, consolidated high school districts, optional elementary unit districts, combined high school ‑ unit districts, combined school districts if the combined district includes any district which was previously required to provide transportation, and any newly created elementary or high school districts resulting from a high school ‑ unit conversion, a unit to dual conversion, or a multi‑unit conversion if the newly created district includes any area that was previously required to provide transportation shall provide free transportation for pupils residing at a distance of one and one‑half miles or more from any school to which they are assigned for attendance maintained within the district, except for those pupils for whom the school board shall certify to the State Board of Education that adequate transportation for the public is available.

Each school board may provide free transportation for any pupil residing within 1 1/2 miles from the school attended where conditions are such that walking, either to or from the school to which a pupil is assigned for attendance or to or from a pick-up point or bus stop, constitutes a serious hazard to the safety of the pupil due to either (i) vehicular traffic or rail crossings or (ii) a course or pattern of criminal activity, as defined in Section 10 of the Illinois Streetgang Terrorism Omnibus Prevention Act. Such transportation shall not be provided if adequate transportation for the public is available. The determination as to what constitutes a serious safety hazard shall be made by the school board, in accordance with guidelines promulgated by the Illinois Department of Transportation regarding vehicular traffic or rail crossings or in accordance with guidelines regarding a course or pattern of criminal activity, as determined by the local law enforcement agency, in consultation with the State Superintendent of Education.

The Department of Transportation shall review the findings of the school board concerning vehicular traffic or rail crossings and shall approve or disapprove the school board’s determination that a serious safety hazard exists within 30 days after the school board submits its findings to the Department of Transportation. The State Board of Education, in consultation with the local law enforcement agency, shall review the findings of the school board concerning a course or pattern of criminal activity and shall approve or disapprove the school board’s determination that a serious safety hazard exists within 30 days after the school board submits its findings to the State Board. The school board shall annually review the conditions and determine whether or not the hazardous conditions remain unchanged.

The school board of any school district that provides any school bus or conveyance for transporting pupils to and from the public schools shall afford transportation, without cost, for children who attend any school other than a public school, who reside at least 1 1/2 miles from the school attended, and who reside on or along the highway constituting the regular route of such public school bus or conveyance, such

Apr
2

Transportation Theme for Preschool

Transportation Theme Activities for Preschool


A preschool transportation theme is a traditional topic in most preschools but why?

Preschoolers love activities that include playing with all types of transportation theme items including vehicles such as cars, trucks, airplanes and more.

This topic is part of their everyday lives.

They drive or walk to school, have seen or ridden on a bus or taken an airplane to go on vacation.

Transportation Preschool Theme

This natural interest in transportation is something they experience in their lives brings life to the theme and your preschool classroom.

Preschool children learn through play.

Providing hands-on activities in all of the Interest Learning Centers in your classroom with a theme in mind will draw them in to play and learn!

This Transporation Theme page is filled with preschool activities and ideas for all areas of your classroom.

Let the Transportation Theme planning begin!

You can either scroll down through this page to see all of the preschool activities for your transportation theme or click the link below to go to specific preschool activity types you are looking for.

Transportation Theme Art

Traffic Lights for a Preschool Transportation Theme

Traffic Lights

Materials Needed: Cardboard egg cartons (in sections of 3); craft sticks; paint; clay

Provide red, yellow and green paint. Place craft stick into bottom. Once painted, place stick into a piece of clay as a base. These are great to use with cars, trucks etc. or in the block area!

Monster Trucks!  Thank you Lisa B. for this idea!

Monster trucks! My children can’t get enough of reading about them and playing with them. 
We did an art activity with paint. They drove the trucks through the paint onto the paper. They loved it! 

Also, they like to drive the trucks through shaving cream mixed with brown paint! 
I haven’t done this yet, but, I thought if I used a Monster truck template, I could have one of each color. They could count them also!

Hot Air Balloons

Materials Needed: Round balloons, watered down glue (or other paper mache recipe you like), strips of newspaper, colored tissue paper, yarn, colored paper or strawberry baskets

Help children (if needed) to cover balloon with at least one layer of newspaper. It may be easier if you encourage them to completely “paint” the balloon with the glue or mache liquid and then cover with strips of news paper and then “paint” over the newspaper.

(Preschoolers tend to give up quickly when they have to pick newspaper out of a tray of glue and water. It is a lot of fine motor activity for them all at once.). After a layer is covering balloon, encourage them to place colored tissue paper over the newspaper and re”paint” with glue.

Let dry for several days. Pop balloons (favorite part in our classroom!). Hole punch a hole on each side of the opening of balloon shape. Using yarn, Tie strawberry baskets onto balloon shape (or have children paint paper to make their own baskets and tie them on).

Extension: Hang Hot Air Balloons

Apr
2

river, sea, oceans, important, largest, types, system, marine, human

Historically, societies have always located near water, due partly to the
fact that water enables more efficient travel compared to going over land.
Waterways are critically important to the transportation of people and
goods throughout the world. The complex network of connections between
coastal ports, inland ports, rail, air, and truck routes forms a
foundation of material economic wealth worldwide.

Within the United States, waterways have been developed and integrated
into a world-class transportation system that has been instrumental in the
country’s economic development. Today, there are more than 17,700
kilometers of commercially important navigation channels in the lower 48
states.

Early History of Water-based Transportation

The historical development of water-based transportation is connected to
the importance of domestic and international trade. Early exploration of
North America identified large amounts of natural resources such as
fisheries, timber, and furs. Trade centers were established along the
east coast of North America where goods could be gathered together and
ocean vessels could transport them to consumers in Europe and other
foreign areas. The success of commercial trading companies spurred the
introduction of

Waterways in developing countries are critical avenues for local and regional commerce. Fruit and vegetable vendors flock to floating markets on rivers and canals, such as this one in Bangkok, Thailand.

Waterways in developing countries are critical avenues for local
and regional commerce. Fruit and vegetable vendors flock to floating
markets on rivers and canals, such as this one in Bangkok, Thailand.

more colonial settlements that in turn resulted in additional increases
in population, economic activity, and trade.

From the sixteenth to the eighteenth centuries, small subsistence farms
were prevalent among the American colonies. Eventually larger farms
emerged and produced crops such as wheat, tobacco, rice, indigo, and
cotton that were commercially marketable in Europe. Ocean vessels
transported the bulk, low-value goods from the colonies to Europe and
returned with high-value, low-density goods such as inks, linens, and
finished products that had a much higher return on the investment per
vessel trip.

Agricultural production continued to grow and support the growing
colonies’ economic development. The speed and low cost of
transporting goods by water influenced the locations of population
settlements near navigable water (rivers, lakes, canals, and oceans).
Goods produced on inland farms were transported via inland waterways to
the coastal ports. Goods shipped by smaller vessels from surrounding
ports were transported to New York, Boston, and Philadelphia, and
exported on larger oceangoing ships. These ships from the smaller ports
then transported imported goods back to the surrounding ports.

During the 1700s, the British government passed many acts, such as the
Navigation Acts and the Stamp Act of 1765, designed to collect taxes
from the colonists. The acts affected trade, and were met with
opposition from the colonist. In Philadelphia during the fall of 1774,
the “Declarations and Resolves of the First Continental
Congress” called for non-importation of British goods, and became
a catalyst for the American Revolutionary War (1775–1784). The
resulting independence for the United States allowed trade a free rein,
and it flourished.

Westward Expansion.

The westward expansion of the United States exposed a wealth of natural
resources and an increased production in agricultural goods. The inland
transportation infrastructure

Apr
2

Department of Transportation and Works

Minister
Hon. Steve Crocker

The Department

Contact Us

(709) 729-2300

Department of
Transportation and Works

The department is responsible for the construction and maintenance of the provincial highways; the provision of the provincial ferry services; management of the provincial government fleet of light vehicles and heavy equipment; operation and maintenance of the provincial government air ambulances and water bombers and construction and management of provincial government buildings.

Find out more about what we do…

Source Article

Apr
2

The Best Way To Get From LaGuardia Airport To Manhattan.

So you’ve braved the long lines, passed through airport security, ate the mediocre or nonexistent food (depending on what airline you flew in on) and you’ve landed at LaGuardia Airport in New York City.

The next task is to get from the airport to your hotel in Manhattan. Fortunately, there are several options that meet almost any budget and circumstance, from the lux of a limo to traveling on public transportation for $2.75. Here are 5 ways to get from LGA to Manhattan:

  1. Travel By Taxi

    This is the easiest and relatively reasonably priced way to get from LaGuardia to anywhere in Manhattan or the entire city of New York.
    The meter will determine the fare you’ll need to pay for the trip from LGA to Manhattan (or anywhere in the city) and is per car with a maximum of 4 people. Traffic during rush hour is horrendous, so that will impact how much your fare will be. You will also have to pay any tolls and don’t forget to tip the driver for his or her excellent service.
    Set aside at least $50, that should be more than enough to cover the trip. For more information about taxi fares in New York City see the Taxi & Limousine Commission Website.
    new york city taxi cab.

    Where do you find a Taxi? There are signs that will direct you to the taxi stands outside ever terminal in the airport. There will be queues/lines of taxis waiting to take you where you want to go. There’s an attendant standing by to answer any questions.

  2. Hire a Car Service to Pick You Up

    This is an excellent way to travel if you’ve got loads of luggage or you’re traveling with kids. The driver will be waiting for you at baggage claim and will whisk your luggage to the car. If you’re got a large party,
    there are vans available that can seat as many as 10 people. This is a great way to get to and from the airport, but it won’t be cheap. Our favorite car services are Carmel Car & Limo Service or Dial 7 Car & Limo Service. Check them out and
    see if this option is for you.

  3. Airport Shuttles

    There are several Airport Shuttle companies to choose from. Once you reach the airport, you can proceed to the Ground Transportation desk to get information on where you catch your shuttle, or you can use one of the courtesy phones in the baggage claim area. Keep in mind that you may not be the only passenger in the van, and you may have to go along for the ride while other passengers are dropped off at
    their destination first.

    Compare prices and schedules at NYC Airporter and Super Shuttle, and choose the one that suits your needs. Often times they will have online specials, making it more affordable.

  4. Public Transportation

    If you don’t have a lot of luggage, can handle stairs, a fair amount of walking and have plenty of time,