July 29, 2021
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These Cars Are Out of Production and Discontinued for 2022
Bouchard Transportation’s Tugs and Barges Auctioned Off
Car chip shortage to abate, smartphones could be next: industry execs
New York Jets assistant coach dies following bicycle accident
Lightyear One Electric Sedan To Be Produced By Valmet Automotive
1 killed in collision between train, vehicle in Douglas County
Washington transportation crew clears Seattle homeless encampment after arrests connected to rock-throwing
Texas dashcam shows illegal immigrants pour out of smuggler’s car after pursuit
30% tax credit for electric bikes makes progress in US Senate
Automotive Hall of Fame to induct Jay Leno, industry leaders
Latest Post
These Cars Are Out of Production and Discontinued for 2022 Bouchard Transportation’s Tugs and Barges Auctioned Off Car chip shortage to abate, smartphones could be next: industry execs New York Jets assistant coach dies following bicycle accident Lightyear One Electric Sedan To Be Produced By Valmet Automotive 1 killed in collision between train, vehicle in Douglas County Washington transportation crew clears Seattle homeless encampment after arrests connected to rock-throwing Texas dashcam shows illegal immigrants pour out of smuggler’s car after pursuit 30% tax credit for electric bikes makes progress in US Senate Automotive Hall of Fame to induct Jay Leno, industry leaders
Jun
2021
18

The Navy Concluded Transmedium Flying Submersibles Were Possible A Decade Ago

A U.S. Navy research document from 2010 outlines the Naval Surface Warfare Center (NSWC) Carderock Division‘s efforts to create a working design of a manned vehicle capable of both airborne flight and submerged travel. The craft was intended to provide stealthy transport for Special Forces units into and out of operating areas. This wasn’t the first study of its kind to propose such a “transmedium” vehicle, defined as one capable of operating in multiple domains, such as in the air and underwater, but building such a craft has proven itself time and time again to be difficult, to say the least. It’s not clear how far the Navy’s efforts went, but the document’s conclusions are significant in that they show that over a decade ago, Naval researchers concluded that a “working design is feasible within the current state of the art.”

Aircraft that could also operate under the sea have long been pursued by the U.S. Navy and other militaries. A number of often unworkable or heavily compromised designs have been proposed and even tested by armed forces around the world since at least the 1950s, including various forms of submersible aircraft, to more modern designs like the short-lived Lockheed Martin Cormorant. While the degree to which these designs have been able to operate in both the sea and air environments vary greatly, among the “holy grails” of aerospace research is a truly hybrid vehicle, a submersible aircraft or “flying submarine” that can travel near-seamlessly between the sky and the sea. 

USN




In 2010, NSWC Carderock published its study of just such a vehicle concept. The idea was to research the feasibility of designing a vehicle that combined “the speed and range of an airborne platform with the stealth of an underwater vehicle by developing a vessel that can both fly and submerge.” The ultimate goal was to work towards developing a vehicle that could insert and extract Special Forces units at much greater ranges and speeds than existing platforms at the time, and be able to do so in locations that were “not previously accessible without direct support from additional military assets.” There have been far less ambitious boat-submarine concepts brought to life as of late, that try to address the issues of getting around the inherent limitations of existing swimmer delivery options. But the technological chasm between creating a vehicle that can transition between the surface and subsurface of the ocean and creating a true flying submarine is absolutely massive. 

The study was born out of a Broad Area Announcement (BAA) issued by DARPA in 2008 calling for design proposals for such a Special Forces vehicle and defining a Concept of Operations (CONOP) for potential designs. NSWC Carderock based its study off of that CONOP, which outlined the need for a vehicle whose capabilities included:

– Deployment from a naval/auxiliary platform;
– take-off from the water surface and transit 400 miles airborne, then land on the water surface;
– submerge and transit 12 [nautical

Jun
2021
18

Pandemic wreaks havoc on school food service, transportation budgets

As school leaders across the region debated the best way to keep students safe during the covid-19 pandemic, budgets for food and transportation services largely went bust as both districts and outside companies were left with fewer bodies queuing through cafeteria lines or riding buses.

With schools bringing students back to the classroom at different rates — some welcomed them all back at the start of the year, while others followed a hybrid model of learning or went fully remote — impacts to food and transportation budgets varied by district. Several lost money on food service, and some saved on transportation.

“Overall, it really varied district to district, and my guess is we won’t have a full accounting of that until sometime this fall or early winter (when they can look) back over what each district did,” said Mark DiRocco, executive director of the Pennsylvania Association of School Administrators.

However, a March report from the School Nutrition Association suggested that schools across the country served 1.7 billion fewer meals between March and November 2020 compared to the same period in 2019. That equated to a $2.1 billion loss in federal revenue for school meal programs.

According to the Virginia-based nonprofit, school meal programs in a typical year are funded by cafeteria sales and federal reimbursements for meals served. Programs often receive around $3.50 per meal, so to break even, organizations rely on a la carte sales and catering programs. School closures, however, largely slashed that revenue.

“We saw a huge financial impact for school nutrition programs,” said Diane Pratt-Heavner, spokeswoman for the School Nutrition Association. “It did vary from one community to the next a bit based on the extent to which they were able to make sure kids continued to receive their meals.”

Efforts were made by the U.S. Department of Agriculture to extend free meals to all students throughout the pandemic, which allowed districts to provide drive-thru meal services while students learned remotely and, in some cases, permitted districts to deliver food to pickup areas.

The extension also allowed districts to serve food through the summer food service program, which provides a higher reimbursement rate compared to the national school lunch and school breakfast program, Heavner noted. However, while the cost of meals was largely covered, districts still incurred other expenses.

“Consequently, you still have to pay your staff to come in and prepare the meals, you have to pay for the delivery service to get them out into those sites in the community, so my guess is most of those districts lost some money in that regard and hopefully the federal stimulus money will help cover some of those costs going back to March of 2020,” DiRocco said.

Peggy Gillespie, assistant to the superintendent for finance and operations at Kiski Area School District, attributed lost revenues to the district keeping on the same number food service workers as in a typical year, even with fewer students in school buildings.

Gillespie noted the district is “in a loss

Jun
2021
18

Arrest made after woman dragged by car, seriously injured in northeast OKC, police say

Police said they have made an arrest after a woman was dragged by a car and seriously injured Tuesday morning in northeast Oklahoma City.According to police, witnesses reported that a woman was being dragged by a car near Northeast 50th Street and MLK. Police said there were several crime scenes and a large trail of blood was found in the area. The woman was dragged for several blocks, possibly half a mile. The driver ditched the car near Northeast 52nd Street and Terry, police said.The woman, later identified as 34-year-old Kendra Hunt, was seriously injured, but is expected to survive.Police also announced that they have arrested a 27-year-old man near Northeast 53rd Street and Everest, in connection with the incident. He is being interviewed and then booked into the Oklahoma County Detention Center.

Police said they have made an arrest after a woman was dragged by a car and seriously injured Tuesday morning in northeast Oklahoma City.

According to police, witnesses reported that a woman was being dragged by a car near Northeast 50th Street and MLK. Police said there were several crime scenes and a large trail of blood was found in the area.

The woman was dragged for several blocks, possibly half a mile. The driver ditched the car near Northeast 52nd Street and Terry, police said.

The woman, later identified as 34-year-old Kendra Hunt, was seriously injured, but is expected to survive.

Police also announced that they have arrested a 27-year-old man near Northeast 53rd Street and Everest, in connection with the incident. He is being interviewed and then booked into the Oklahoma County Detention Center.

Jun
2021
18

The Bristol Press – Hamelin & Sons Automotive Repair celebrates 75 years in Bristol

BRISTOL – Michael Hamelin said the biggest challenge in running an independent automobile shop is keeping oneself educated on the numerous trends and changes that have come with the evolution of vehicles.

Hamelin & Sons Automotive Repair at 64 West Street celebrated their success in overcoming that challenge for 75 years of business, Thursday. Michael is a third generation owner of the business and his nephew, Joe Hamelin, is set to inherit its operation in due time. Joe is the son of Michael’s brother, Dave.

“As near as we can place it, the business started in October of 1946,” said Michael. “We’ve always been in this location and it started with a small two bay garage and over the years we’ve had three expansions of the building. The first expansion was around 1955, then 1985 and then 2001. We were originally gasoline and repairs. We eliminated gasoline and now it’s emission and repairs.”

Michael said the business’ specialties have changed a little over the years depending on who was on staff and owning the business at the time.

“For a while it was automatic transmissions then it was carboateur rebuilding,” said Michael. “Now, it’s obviously into emissions repairs and that type of stuff. It varied. Basically, we’ve always done general repairs and service.”

Michael said that his grandfather Ernest and Uncle George started the business.

“My father joined them but he was not an owner until 1978 and that’s when my uncle retired. Ernest had retired previously. In 1984, my father retired, then it was my brother Dave and myself. My brother just retired in January of 2019.”

Currently, Michael runs a staff with four employees. He makes up the fifth worker on site.

“I’ve been working here since I was 14-years-old,” said Michael. “Most everyone here started sweeping floors and worked their way up.”

Michael said that hardest thing about the business is staying educated.

“Being an independent (automotive repair shop), we’re a small business. Trying to stay educated is always on us and we don’t have a corporate backing. We’re not a dealership. Keeping up with the technology, even back when my father was here, he had to keep up,” said Michael. “Our greatest success has been longevity and the loyalty of our customers.”

Michael said he’s maintained his certification as master mechanic for 45 with Automotive Service Excellence since he first received it when he was 21.

Central Connecticut Chambers of Commerce President Cindy Bombard and Bristol Mayor Ellen Zoppo-Sassu both said that businesses such as Hamelin and Sons were the backbone of American Main Streets across the country.

Posted in The Bristol Press, Bristol on Thursday, 10 June 2021 15:29. Updated: Thursday, 10 June 2021 15:45.