July 29, 2021
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These Cars Are Out of Production and Discontinued for 2022
Bouchard Transportation’s Tugs and Barges Auctioned Off
Car chip shortage to abate, smartphones could be next: industry execs
New York Jets assistant coach dies following bicycle accident
Lightyear One Electric Sedan To Be Produced By Valmet Automotive
1 killed in collision between train, vehicle in Douglas County
Washington transportation crew clears Seattle homeless encampment after arrests connected to rock-throwing
Texas dashcam shows illegal immigrants pour out of smuggler’s car after pursuit
30% tax credit for electric bikes makes progress in US Senate
Automotive Hall of Fame to induct Jay Leno, industry leaders
Latest Post
These Cars Are Out of Production and Discontinued for 2022 Bouchard Transportation’s Tugs and Barges Auctioned Off Car chip shortage to abate, smartphones could be next: industry execs New York Jets assistant coach dies following bicycle accident Lightyear One Electric Sedan To Be Produced By Valmet Automotive 1 killed in collision between train, vehicle in Douglas County Washington transportation crew clears Seattle homeless encampment after arrests connected to rock-throwing Texas dashcam shows illegal immigrants pour out of smuggler’s car after pursuit 30% tax credit for electric bikes makes progress in US Senate Automotive Hall of Fame to induct Jay Leno, industry leaders
Jun
2021
17

Denver officer’s vehicle hit on I-25, suspect arrested

The officer was blocking traffic for an unrelated crash when his vehicle was hit, and he was taken to a hospital as a precaution, police said.

DENVER — A Denver Police Department (DPD) officer suffered minor injuries when a car hit his vehicle as he was blocking traffic for a crash early Sunday on Interstate 25, according to police.

The crash happened about 3:30 a.m. on I-25 southbound near the exit to 6th Avenue, according to DPD. The officer was in his vehicle blocking traffic for the unrelated crash when the suspect vehicle sideswiped his vehicle, a DPD spokesperson said.

The suspect vehicle continued south I-25 for a short distance before the driver pulled over, got out of the vehicle and ran, the spokesperson said.

The suspect was located in the area of South Kalamath Street and West Bayaud Avenue. Officers smelled alcohol on his breath, and his eyes were bloodshot and watery, and his speech was slurred, according to a probable cause (PC) statement in the case.

The suspect, identified as Raul Barragan, 22, was taken into custody and was held on suspicion of driving under the influence, according to DPD.

The officer suffered minor injuries and was taken to a hospital as a precaution, police said.

I-25 southbound was closed at 6th Avenue for a couple of hours for the investigation and reopened about 5:20 a.m., according to police.

RELATED: 2-year-old found safe inside stolen car

RELATED: Road rage incident goes 8 miles across Denver, ends in shooting

RELATED: 11-year-old hit, dragged by drunken driver, witnesses lift car off him, police said

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Jun
2021
17

CDC Updates COVID-19 Guidance for Mask Wearing on Outdoor Transit Hubs, Public Transportation

Fully vaccinated Americans can now ditch their masks in outdoor transit hubs and on outdoor public transportation, the Centers for Disease Control said in updated guidance issued Thursday.

The new recommendations apply to any outdoor transportation areas, like outside an airport or a bus stop, as well as outdoor areas of public transportation, like the deck of a ferry or an open-air trolley.

Unvaccinated travelers should still continue to wear their masks in all public transportation-related areas, indoors and outdoors, the agency noted.

“CDC will continue to evaluate the requirements of its Order and determine whether additional changes may be warranted,” the agency wrote. “While those who are fully vaccinated may resume many activities without wearing a mask, the travel environment presents a unique set of circumstances based on the number and close interaction of travelers (both vaccinated and unvaccinated).”

Ferry

ANGELA WEISS/AFP via Getty Images

The updated guidance comes weeks after the CDC said fully vaccinated people don’t have to wear their masks outdoors and in many indoor situations. Masks are still required on planes and inside airports, regardless of a person’s vaccination status – a rule that has been extended until at least September.

The CDC has said fully vaccinated people can travel at low risk to themselves and don’t need to quarantine upon returning from an international or domestic trip, and has loosened cruise restrictions for vaccinated travelers (like allowing them to explore ports on their own rather than book a shore excursion through the cruise line).

When it comes to vaccine progress, 64% of Americans 18 and older have received at least one dose of a vaccine, and 53.4% are considered fully vaccinated, according to the CDC.

So far, ABC News reported 13 states have vaccinated at least 70% of their adult populations with at least one dose: Pennsylvania, Vermont, Hawaii, New Hampshire, Massachusetts, Connecticut, Maine, New Jersey, Rhode Island, New Mexico, Washington, Maryland, and California.

Alison Fox is a contributing writer for Travel + Leisure. When she’s not in New York City, she likes to spend her time at the beach or exploring new destinations and hopes to visit every country in the world. Follow her adventures on Instagram.

Jun
2021
17

Huawei targets driverless car by 2025

It was only in April that Chinese technology company Huawei said it wants to invest in electric vehicles and self-driving technology, and now a company executive has said the goal is to have a driverless car ready by the middle of the decade.

“Our team’s goal is to reach true driverless passenger cars in 2025,” Wang Jun, senior executive at Huawei’s automotive unit, said at an industry conference held last week, according to Reuters.

But unlike some of its peers, Huawei is unlikely to introduce its own vehicles. Eric Xu, co-chairman at the telecommunications giant, previously said the company would work with established automakers to create cars carrying the Huawei name as a sub-brand.

We’ve already seen this process in action. At April’s Auto Shanghai 2021, Chinese automaker BAIC showed off the Arcfox Alpha-S (shown main) which features a self-driving system developed by Huawei. The system is already quite advanced, with a prototype able to cover 620 miles of complex urban environments without the need for any corrections from the safety driver behind the wheel.

Huawei has been forced to expand into new sectors due to recent sanctions made by the United States against the company surrounding alleged cybersecurity concerns and other issues. A number of other markets followed with similar restrictions, leading Huawei to focus more on its home market. The company is also expanding into agriculture and healthcare.

But Huawei isn’t the only Chinese technology company in the race to develop self-driving cars. Search engine giant Baidu in May launched a commercial self-driving taxi service in Beijing.

Jun
2021
17

Joe Biden gifts Boris Johnson a custom-made bicycle and helmet; Here’s how much it costs

US President Joe Biden gifted UK Prime Minister Boris Johnson a custom-built bicycle as a special souvenir for the first meeting between the two heads of state in Cornwall ahead of the G7 summit. According to reports, the special hand-built bicycle was designed as a part of the customary exchange of gifts between the heads and was chosen keeping in mind Johnson’s regular cycling outings in London. 

Biden gift to Johnson

The bike was custom-made by a Philadelphia firm in a record time and at a third of the price. The red and white bike, in the colours of the United Kingdom flag, would otherwise take months to construct. According to the Philadelphia Inquirer, owner of Bilenky Cycle Works- Stephen Bilenky was contacted by the US State Department on May 23 with a request to design a custom-made bicycle and a matching helmet for UK Prime Minister Boris Johnson.

Operating on a staff of four persons only, Bilenky Cycle Works usually takes up to 18 months to make a custom-made bicycle, however, the order was expedited ahead of the President’s visit to the UK for the G7 summit on June 10. 

‘Controlled chaos’ followed shortly after, as per the owner who began powering to meet the prestigious order. The price of the special hand-made bike stands at a whopping $6,000, however, the budget was only set to $1,500 (£1,060), a third of the minimum price the firm charges. 

Apart from Biden’s gift to Johnson, US First Lady Jill Biden gave Carrie Johnson, UK PM’s newly-wedded wife a leather tote bag made by the wives of American troops, along with a presidential silk scarf.  

 

UK gifts Biden a mural

In a nod to the Black Lives Matter protest, UK Prime Minister Boris Johnson on the other hand gave US President Joe Biden a framed photograph of a British mural featuring 19th-century Black abolitionist Frederick Douglass. The gifted image is painted by Ross Blair and it is a part of a mural trail around Edinburgh, photographed by Melissa Highton, an American-British dual national.

Johnson also gave US First Lady Jill Biden the first edition copy of Daphne du Maurier’s The Apple Tree. Downing Street said in a statement that the choice of the book was to reflect Du Maurier’s Cornish links. 

(Image- Bilenky Cycle Works)

Jun
2021
17

QOTD: What Modern Automotive Amenity Could You Do Without?


Unless you’ve been stuck under a rock for the past six months, you’ll know that the impact of the ongoing chip shortage is monumental to the automotive industry. It would seem that virtually every manufacturer has been hit, and the fallout is ranging from lost sales to brands completely rethinking their future product line-ups.

A bit of background. As with most things that seem to hit the headlines these days, the issue stems from the pandemic. To oversimplify the situation, car manufactures scaled back production as the world went into meltdown and countries into lockdown. Demand for electronics, however, like laptops, game consoles and TVs soared as people had to spend more time at home.

Automakers no longer needed as many chips, most of which are outsourced. Chip manufacturers naturally directed their attention to the electronics boom spurred on by the hordes of WFH employees. But, as stay-at-home orders were relaxed, the auto sector started to recover far faster than anyone could have predicted. However, with demand for electronics showing no signs of waning, and automakers put at the bottom of the supply pile, demand started to outstrip supply.

Read: This Is Why The Chip Shortage Means Car Makers Can’t Keep Up With Demand

Modern cars are heavily dependent on these chips, otherwise known as semiconductors. But it has to be said, a large portion of this reliance is for things that, not too long ago, were either non-existent or not that widespread. Less than 15 years ago, we did just fine with our manual HVAC controls and analog speedometers. Indeed, it can be argued just how superfluous the advantages are of adjusting cabin temperatures within a fraction of a Celsius via a touchpad.

But now, as they start to feel the pinch, we’re seeing automakers taking a long, hard look at how they can keep production lines running by cutting out certain features. I suspect it’s not as simple as reassigning a semiconductor used in a head-up display into an engine management system, but we’re starting to see some interesting changes nonetheless.

See: Chip Shortage Forces GM To Build Some Pickups And SUVs Without Start-Stop

Earlier this year, Peugeot announced that the 308 was losing its digital display cluster, instead going old-school with analog replacement dials. And recently, GM announced the omission of its start-stop tech on certain models — a move that was seen as a step in the right direction rather than a loss, at least going by the comments section.

So, today’s question is: what piece of in-car tech would you not care less about losing — chip shortage or not. Let’s start you off with three of my own.

Rear-View Cameras

Now I’m not talking about backup cameras or even those nifty surround-view systems. In this case, I’m referring solely to replacing door-mounted mirrors with video feeds. Yes, mirrors could get fogged up and, depending on the curvature and size, may have had restricted fields of view. But cameras don’t have that many advantages either.