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Archive of posts published in the category: Ways
Apr
16

State leaders consider ways to extend vehicle inspection deadlines

The leaders from the North Carolina General Assembly said they support legislation to extend vehicle inspections deadlines. Click the video player above to learn more about the statement “We continue to work with the governor’s team to identify and resolve issues facing North Carolinians in this crisis,” Speaker Tim Moore and Senator Phil Berger said in a joint statement Thursday. “DMV regulations are a particularly pressing matter that we have worked daily for several weeks on a bipartisan basis to resolve.” “This shared commitment by the legislative and executive branches provides North Carolinians’ certainty that the state government will provide this flexibility they need now and act to retroactively alleviate DMV deadlines despite the current law temporarily in place.”The leaders issued the statement on Thursday. The issue of vehicle inspection came up during the coronavirus outbreak. As of now, it is still required to get your license plate renewed and state lawmakers are looking to change the deadlines.

The leaders from the North Carolina General Assembly said they support legislation to extend vehicle inspections deadlines.

Click the video player above to learn more about the statement

“We continue to work with the governor’s team to identify and resolve issues facing North Carolinians in this crisis,” Speaker Tim Moore and Senator Phil Berger said in a joint statement Thursday. “DMV regulations are a particularly pressing matter that we have worked daily for several weeks on a bipartisan basis to resolve.”

“This shared commitment by the legislative and executive branches provides North Carolinians’ certainty that the state government will provide this flexibility they need now and act to retroactively alleviate DMV deadlines despite the current law temporarily in place.”

The leaders issued the statement on Thursday.

The issue of vehicle inspection came up during the coronavirus outbreak. As of now, it is still required to get your license plate renewed and state lawmakers are looking to change the deadlines.

Source Article

Apr
3

Five Ways COVID-19 May Impact The Future Of Infrastructure And Transportation

With each passing day, reports on rising total confirmed cases of COVID-19 continue to dominate the global conscience, and the novel coronavirus is now present on every continent except for Antarctica. And the resulting fear is more pervasive. Thousands of people have perished as the effects of COVID-19 touch us all: stock markets have cratered, millions have become unemployed (temporarily or soon-to-be permanently), the federal government has passed a multi-trillion-dollar aid package, and health care institutions are being stretched thin. To “flatten the curve,” millions of people around the globe are quarantined in their homes or elsewhere, while infrastructure and transportation systems that bonded us globally, nationally, and locally are being used more sparingly, at least currently. Long-term, what could be the lasting effects on transportation and infrastructure in our post-COVID-19 world?

Public Transportation: Even though we are still in the first few weeks of what may be a prolonged quarantine throughout the United States, we have already seen a travel advisory issued for the New York City area, where transit ridership ranks among the highest in the country. So what does the future of transportation look like through a mandatorily-quarantined window? It’s murky, both because the windows need “cleaning” and the future of everything is covered with a COVID-19 glaze at the moment. One helpful data point is that during prior SARS outbreaks in Taiwan, there was a material drop in ridership of public transportation. If a return to work and schools occurs before a vaccine is created, people may not feel comfortable riding public transportation. With transit ridership dropping in Los Angeles in particular, could transit agencies be affected permanently?

Traffic: Assuming we remain quarantined in some form until successful treatments for COVID-19 are administered worldwide, Americans and others globally will be working from home for many months (if not for over a year). As some businesses may decide to permanently have their employees work from home to save on real estate costs, the number of commuters on the roads may drastically drop. So, could that lead to more commuters taking advantage of less congested roads, perhaps even those who traditionally rode public transportation?

Driverless cars: Another possible (and perhaps positive) impact on transportation from the effects of the COVID-19 pandemic could be the acceleration of mass adoption of driverless cars, and, hopefully, the “tweaks” that are needed to our infrastructure to maximize the safety and efficiency of driverless cars to ensure they are connected to other driverless cars, road infrastructure, and their own designated lanes away from “human” drivers. Will the future of commuting consist of a double-down of personal vehicles, but driven by themselves and connected to our infrastructure so we don’t have to just work from home, but also from our cars?

Micromobility: As urban