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Archive of posts published in the category: state
Apr
7

N.J. counties shutting down parks to slow coronavirus spread, but state parks still open

In line with Gov. Phil Murphy’s order Monday to tighten a state lockdown on public gatherings, parks in at least two New Jersey counties will be closed indefinitely due to the coronavirus outbreak, officials said.

“We had started to close some parks to the public last week in an effort to curtail large gatherings and because of a lack of social distancing,” Ocean County Freeholder Virginia E. Haines said in a statement.

Ocean County as of Monday had 874 cases of coronavirus, according to New Jersey health officials.

“Because the power of social distancing cannot be stressed enough, we are taking this next step and shutting down all of our parks and natural land sites to the public.”

“Parks and natural lands will be closed to the public starting at 6 p.m. (Tuesday) until further notice,” Ocean County officials said in a statement. There are 27 parks across the county spread across 4,000 acres, along with 30,000 acres of natural lands, officials said.

Ocean County had already shut down its two golf courses, public playgrounds, playing fields, in response to COVID-19, Haines said.

“It’s important we take this step (of closing all parks) to further protect our citizens from the spread of the coronavirus,” Haines said. “We have to take this seriously.”

Bergen County Executive Jim Tedesco last week ordered parks in his county closed as of 8 a.m. Saturday. The county on Monday continued to have more reported cases than any county in New Jersey – 2,482 across 69 municipalities, according to state officials.

“Keeping the parks open has placed a tremendous burden on local law enforcement, the Bergen County sheriff and other critical resources during this pandemic,” Tedesco said in an email.

Bergen County has nearly two dozen parks, miles of bicycle trails and numerous dog parks, according to its website.

“Local authorities have reported complications, including but not limited to traffic congestion, parking issues and non-compliance with social distancing guidelines, related to park visitation, resulting in the need for closure,” Tedesco said.

In the city of Hoboken, parks were closed 8 a.m. Monday for two weeks to halt the spread of COVID-19, said Mayor Ravi Bhalla.

Across New Jersey, state parks remain open but facilities — like restrooms, visitor centers and campgrounds — are closed until further notice in an effort to prevent the spread of the virus.

Other county-maintained parks in New Jersey as of Tuesday remained open but many of them with restrictions.

In Middlesex County, all events and picnics are suspended until April 30.

“Parks and open space will remain open to the public for passive recreation, including roads, parking areas, trails, lakes and other open space areas,” Middlesex County stated on its website.

“However, restrooms, comfort stations, playgrounds, dog parks, basketball and tennis courts, the flying field, and similar facilities are closed until further notice,” the county said.

Coronavirus cases in New Jersey continued to climb Monday with 16,636 cases spread among all 21 counties as of Monday. There have been 198 deaths

Apr
5

NMSU Parking Information | New Mexico State University

Kiosks Available for Parking Permits

Two kiosks are located by the Parking/ID Card Cashiers’ area in Barnes & Noble bookstore and one will be at the NMSU Police Station’s reception area. Kiosks will have printer access  and will print temporary permits. Your confirmation receipt will serve as your temporary permit and must be displayed on the dash of your vehicle.


PARKING PERMITS will only be available for purchase online — not in person. Kiosks are also available to register and print a temporary permit. 

NMSU Parking Rules are in effect from 7:30 a.m. – 4:30 p.m. Monday – Friday with free parking on the evenings and weekends, and free parking lots located around campus.

NOTE: Parking citations are administered by the NMSU Police Department. Questions or comments should be directed to parking@nmsu.edu  or 575-646-2418.


Free Parking and Shuttle Service
NMSU makes it easy and affordable to park and commute around campus. Aggie Transit provides free shuttle routes that transport riders with a valid Aggie ID from free parking lots (identified in brown on the parking map).


Permitted Parking Lots
A variety of NMSU Parking Permits are available for those who wish to park in a designated “permitted” parking lot. Parking rules are enforced Monday – Friday from 7:30 a.m. – 4:30 p.m. Please consult the parking map for designated parking locations.


Departmental Placards 
NMSU Departments may request a special placard that will allow parking in specified areas of campus.


Just Visiting?
For those who only visit campus periodically, a variety of Visitor Permits are available.


Plenty of Spaces!
There are about 13,500 available parking spaces on campus. However, during the university’s peak hours (9 a.m. – 2 p.m. weekdays), only about 7,900 of those spaces are filled at one time. Therefore, there are generally at least 5,600 open spaces available when you arrive!

HELPFUL TIP: The lots around the center of campus near Corbett Center Student Union (CCSU), the Horseshoe, and the Barnes & Noble at NMSU Bookstore & Café tend to fill up very fast and remain occupied most of the day. Reduce the time and stress of driving around looking for a spot by simply parking in the “All Permits” lots east of Chamisa Village on Stewart Street. These lots are historically underutilized and are only a couple minutes walk from CCSU.


Parking & Traffic Regulations

Click here for parking & traffic regulations.


Road & Parking Closures
Click here for information on campus road and/or parking closures.


Questions? Click here for more information.

Transportation & Parking Services is pleased to employ nearly two dozen NMSU students!

Switch to Transportation Services

 

Source Article

Apr
5

Maine vehicle inspection expirations extended for the duration of state of emergency


Governor Janet Mills issued an executive order last week that
indefinitely extends expiration dates on all vehicle inspection stickers and
registrations, as well as driver’s licenses and state IDs. Expiration dates are
extended until the state of emergency caused by the spread of coronavirus in
Maine is lifted.

Included in the order are all driver’s licenses, permits, state identification cards, commercial driver’s licenses, dealer licenses, salvage motor vehicle recycler licenses, driver and rider school licenses and instructor licenses. In addition, the Maine State Police, which is responsible for overseeing Maine’s annual vehicle inspection program, is also extending expiration dates on vehicle inspections and registrations, and temporary registrations, for the duration of the state of emergency.

The order issued last week extends a similar order issued on March 15. Maine police departments have been directed halt enforcement of expired vehicle inspections as well.

 “The State of Maine
recognizes the needs of individuals, families and businesses for
transportation, work and commerce during the emergency. These registrations can
be renewed after the emergency ends,” the Secretary of State’s Office said in a
statement.

Lawmakers had the opportunity to eliminate Maine’s annual vehicle inspection program entirely in the First Session of the 129th Legislature. However, the state’s transportation committee unanimously voted in opposition to the bill despite evidence that inspections waste time and money while providing no benefit towards improving public health and safety.

Discussing the inspection program, the bill’s sponsor, Sen. Dave Miramant, said, “No evidence supports that [the inspection program] has any benefit, and I still say we’re taking advantage of Maine drivers at a time when they can least afford it, and not to any safety benefit.”

He cited a 2017 Brigham Young University study
that found:

“Terminating the vehicle safety inspection program resulted in no significant change in either the frequency or intensity of fatalities due to car failure. This finding strongly suggests that vehicle safety inspection programs are no longer necessary, and are simply a form of redidual government oversight. Government attention to other areas (e.g. distracted driving laws, seat belt enforcement, etc.) is more efficient than safety inspections at ensuring road safety.”

In 2019, the state generated $3.5 million in revenue from
Mainers through the vehicle inspection program. In recent years, lawmakers have
also turned down proposals to move to a biennial inspection program and to
eliminate the inspection requirement for newer vehicles.

The temporary hiatus in vehicle inspections and enforcement should give lawmakers new motor vehicle safety data to examine in the 130th Legislature, hopefully to eliminate the state’s annual inspection program once and for all.


Source Article

Apr
3

New York State Police Looking For Owner Of Missing Bicycle

New York State Police are looking for the owner of a found bicycle.

According to police the black mountain bike was found behind a residence in the Town of Marcy.

The bike was found on March 14th in a backyard by the homeowner hidden in the underbrush of the back yard.

If you recognize this bicycle or believe it is yours, you’re asked to call State Police Headquarters at (315) 366-6000. Please refer to case #9477052.

This story is reminiscent of the 1985 film “Pee-Wee’s Big Adventure.” He was on a mission to find his bike!

Source Article

Apr
2

Vehicle Classification Information – New York State Thruway

Vehicle Classification Information

Vehicle classification is based on the height of the vehicle over the first two axles and the total number of axles, including any towed vehicles or trailers.  Vehicles under 7 feet 6 inches in height are considered “LOW” (L).  Vehicles 7 feet 6 inches in height or greater are considered “HIGH” (H).

The total number of axles plus the height designation equals the vehicle class as shown in the table (Figure 1) below. The diagram (Figure 2) below shows approximate vehicle heights in relation to the toll booth. Diagram (Figure 3) below shows examples of axle counts on various vehicles.   Example: Most two-axle passenger vehicles are Class 2L.

Helpful information can also be found in the Frequently Asked Questions. (Discount applies to E-ZPassNY accounts only).

Figure 1 – Vehicle Class Table
Class Height Number of Axles E-ZPass* Discount
2L UNDER 7 feet 6 inches 2 5%
3L UNDER 7 feet 6 inches 3 5%
4L UNDER 7 feet 6 inches 4 or more 5%
2H 7 feet 6 inches OR GREATER 2 5%
3H 7 feet 6 inches OR GREATER 3 5%
4H 7 feet 6 inches OR GREATER 4 5%
5H 7 feet 6 inches OR GREATER 5 5%
6H 7 feet 6 inches OR GREATER 6 5%
7H 7 feet 6 inches OR GREATER 7 or more 5%

*Discount reflected in E-ZPass Toll Schedules


Figure 2 – Diagram showing approximate vehicle heights in relation to toll booth

Image showing examples of heights of vehicles


Figure 3 – Examples of axle counts on various vehicles

5 axle truck

5 axles

 

2 axle car

2 axles

 

3 axles total, 2 on car, 1 in tow

3 axles






Source Article

Apr
1

Unlawful Vehicle Modifications: State Laws

State Statute Alabama Regulation of Operation of Motor Vehicles: Equipment

(AL Code Title 32, Ch. 5, scroll to Article 9)
Window Tinting (AL Code Title 32, Ch. 5C)

Alaska

Vehicle Equipment Standards

(AK Statutes scroll to section 28.05.081)

Arizona Equipment

(ARS Title 28 scroll to 28-921 to 28-966)

Arkansas Size and Load Regulations

(AR Code Title 27, Ch. 35)
Equipment Regulations (AR Code Title 27, Ch. 37)

California Division 12 – Equipment of Vehicles (scroll down)

(California Vehicle Code)

Colorado Regulation of Vehicles and Traffic: Equipment

(CRS Title 42 scroll to 42-4-201 to 42-4-239)

Connecticut Motor Vehicles: Equipment

(GSC Ch. 246 scroll to section 14-80 to 14-106)

Delaware Equipment Requirements

(DE Code Title 21, Ch. 43, Subchapter I)
Lights (DE Code Title 21, Ch. 43, Subchapter II)

District of Columbia

D.C. Vehicle Code (scroll to Title 50)

Florida State Uniform Traffic Control: Equipment

(FS Ch. 316 scroll to 316.217 to 316.455)

Georgia Vehicles and equipment

(Georgia Code §sect; 40-8-7 to 40-8-90)

Hawaii Street rod vehicle requirements

(HRS section 286-26.5)

Idaho Vehicle Equipment

(ID Statutes Title 49, Ch. 9)

Illinois Equipment of Vehicles

(625 ILCS 5, Chapter 12)

Indiana Motor Vehicle Equipment

(Indiana Code Title 9, Article 19)

Iowa Vehicle Equipment

(IA Code Ch. 321 scroll to 321.384 to 321.481 )

Kansas Equipment of Vehicles

(KS Statutes Ch. 8, Article 17)

Kentucky Vehicle Equipment

(KRS Chapter 189 scroll to sections .020 to .205)

Louisiana Motor Vehicles and Traffic Regulation: Equipment

(LRS Title 32 scroll to 32:301 to 32:369)
Low rider vehicles (LRS 32:297)
Proper equipment required on vehicles (LRS 32:53)

Maine Equipment

(MRS Title 29-A Chapter 17)

Maryland Equipment of Vehicles

(MD Transp. Code Title 22)

Massachusetts Operation of unregistered or improperly equipped motor vehicles

(90 MGL section 9)

Michigan Equipment

(MI Vehicle Code sections 257.683 to 257.711)
After-Market Lighting [PDF] (MI State Police)

Minnesota Traffic Regulations: Equipment

(MN Statutes Ch. 169; scroll to 169.47 to 169.75)

Mississippi Equipment and Identification

(MS Code Title 63, Ch. 7)

Missouri Vehicle Equipment Regulations

(MRS Chapter 307)

Montana Vehicle Equipment

(MCA Title 61, Ch. 9)

Nebraska Vehicle equipment and violations

(R.R.S. Nebr. § 60-6, 220 et al.)

Nevada Equipment of Vehicles

(NRS 484.541 to 484.646)

New Hampshire Equipment of Vehicles

(NH Statutes Ch. 266)

New Jersey Motor vehicle equipment

(NJ Statutes 39:3-46 to 39:3-84)

New Mexico Motor Vehicles: Equipment

(NMS Ch. 66, Article 3 scroll to Part 9)

New York Equipment of Motor Vehicles and Motorcycles

(NY Vehicle & Traffic Code Article 9)

North Carolina Motor Vehicle Act: Equipment

(NCGS Ch. 20, Article 3 scroll to sections 20-122 to 20-137)

North Dakota Equipment of Vehicles

[PDF] (ND Code Chapter 39-21)
Size, Width, and Height Restrictions [PDF] (ND Code Chapter 39-12)

Ohio Traffic Laws: Equipment

(ORC Chapter 4513)

Oklahoma Vehicle equipment

(OK Statutes Title 47 scroll to 47-12-101)

Oregon Vehicle Equipment Generally

[PDF] (OR Vehicle Code Ch. 815)
Vehicle Equipment Lights [PDF] (OR Vehicle Code Ch. 816)

Pennsylvania Equipment Standards

[PDF] (PA Vehicle Code Ch. 41)
Lighting Equipment [PDF] (PA Vehicle Code Ch. 43)
Other

Apr
1

Buying and Maintaining a Car | State of California – Department of Justice

Buying and Maintaining a Car

Buying a car – whether new or used – is one of the biggest purchases we make. It is important to take your time in deciding which car to buy and not be pressured by anyone who simply wants your money or your signature on a contract. Once you decide on the vehicle that best fits your needs and budget, shop around for the best price, know the vehicle’s history (if used), and be prepared to walk away from the deal if your questions are not being answered. Before you buy or lease a vehicle:

  • Know the value of the vehicle by checking vehicle pricing guides, newspaper ads, the Internet, or by comparison shopping. Popular publications include the National Automobile Dealers Association’s (NADA) Guides, Edmunds, Kelley Blue Book, and Consumer Reports. Some may charge for this information.
  • Always read and understand your purchase contract. Carefully review the vehicle’s price, fees, and finance charges. Don’t sign anything you don’t understand.
  • Make sure you understand the manufacturer’s warranty or any extended warranties offered by the dealer at extra cost. Because the cost of an extended warranty can be expensive, you should find out what it covers before you buy it.
  • When getting a loan, compare interest rates. You may pay more money when a dealer obtains a loan on your behalf than if you go directly to a bank or lender.
  • Protect yourself from fraud and unsafe used vehicles. The National Motor Vehicle Title Information System (NMVTIS) provides important information about a used vehicle’s history. You can obtain a NMVTIS report at www.vehiclehistory.gov. Licensed dealers selling used cars must have a NMVTIS report to show you.
  • Understand the restrictions when buying an out of state vehicle: the car must be certified to meet California smog laws to be registered in California. See Buying an Out of State Vehicle on the California DMV website.
  • Find out if a vehicle has a safety recall notice and whether it has been repaired by checking the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration and Center for Auto Safety websites.

Car Buyer’s Bill of Rights

The Car Buyer’s Bill of Rights gives you certain protections when you buy a new or used vehicle from a licensed California dealer:

  • Buyer Disclosures. No charges may be added to your contract without full disclosure and your consent. Dealers must give you an itemized price list for optional “add-on” items such as service contracts, insurance, anti-theft devices, or other products.
  • Credit Score Disclosures. If you are obtaining financing from the dealer, the dealer must provide you with your credit score and a written explanation of how it is used.
  • Limit on Markups. When a dealer obtains financing on your behalf, it sometimes adds a hidden markup to increase the interest rate on your loan. The law caps the amount of compensation a dealer can receive from the lender.
  • Certified Used Cars. Used cars advertised as “certified” must meet specific requirements. Dealers must perform a complete vehicle inspection and
Mar
31

State Efforts To Promote Hybrid and Electric Vehicles

USA FlagForty-five states and the District of Columbia provide an incentive for certain hybrid and/or electric vehicles, either through a specific utility operating in the state or through state legislation. The incentives range from tax credits or rebates to fleet acquisition goals, exemptions from emissions testing or utility time-of-use rate reductions. The five gray colored states do not have any laws or policies in place that would specifically impact the buying of an electric vehicle or the building of electric vehicle supply equipment (EVSE). In addition, 20 states have enacted legislation to implement a special registration fee on alternatively fueled or electric vehicles. All fees are in addition to the standard registration fees.

Additional maps comparing specific state incentives are displayed at the bottom of the page.

 Alabama

AL flag

Charging Rate Incentive: Alabama Power offers a residential PEV rate for customers who verify possession of a qualified PEV and a Business Electric Vehicle Time-of-Use (BEVT) rate for electricity purchased to charge PEVs used for fleet purposes. The electricity used for vehicle charging is metered separately from all other electricity use.

Arizona

AZ flagAlternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) Parking Incentive: An individual driving a dedicated AFV may park without penalty in parking areas that are designated for carpool operators, provided the vehicle is using alternative fuel. Recognized alternative fuels include propane, natural gas, electricity, hydrogen and a blend of hydrogen with propane or natural gas.

AFV Use Tax Exemption: S.B. 1413 (2014) exempts certain alternative fuels such as natural gas, electricity, propane, and hydrogen from the state use tax.

Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment Tax Credit: A tax credit of up to $75 is available to individuals for the installation of EV charging outlets in a house or housing unit built by the individual.

HOV Lane Exemption: Qualified alternative fuel vehicles may use designated HOV lanes regardless of the number of occupants in the vehicle.

Joint Use of Government Fueling Infrastructure: To the extent practical, an Arizona state agency or political subdivision that operates an alternative fueling station must allow vehicles, other state agencies or political subdivisions own or operate to fuel at the station. For the purpose of this requirement, alternative fuels include propane, natural gas, electricity, hydrogen, and a blend of hydrogen with propane or natural gas.

Plug-In Electric Vehicle Charging Rates:  The Salt River Project offers an experimental reduced rate time-of-use plan for certain plug-in hybrid and electric vehicle owners.

Reduced AFV License Tax: The vehicle license tax for an AFV is $4 for every $100 in assessed value. During the first year after initial registration, the AFV ‘s assessed value is 1 percent of the manufacturer’s base retail price (compared to 60 percent for conventional vehicles). For each succeeding year, the original value of the AFV is reduced by 15 percent. The minimum amount of the annual AFV license tax is $5. For the purpose of this tax, AFVs include those powered exclusively by propane, natural gas, electricity, hydrogen, or a blend of hydrogen with propane or natural gas.

Vehicle Emissions

Mar
30

Fatality Facts 2018State by state

Overview

The number and types of motor vehicle crash deaths differ widely among the 50 states and the District of Columbia. A state’s population has an obvious effect on the number of motor vehicle deaths. Fatality rates per capita and per vehicle miles traveled provide a way of examining motor vehicle deaths relative to the population and amount of driving. However, many factors can affect these rates, including types of vehicles driven, travel speeds, rates of licensure, state traffic laws, emergency care capabilities, weather, and topography.

The following facts are based on analysis of data from the U.S. Department of Transportation’s Fatality Analysis Reporting System (FARS).

Posted December 2019.


Fatal crash totals

There were 33,654 fatal motor vehicle crashes in the United States in 2018 in which 36,560 deaths occurred. This resulted in 11.2 deaths per 100,000 people and 1.13 deaths per 100 million miles traveled. The fatality rate per 100,000 people ranged from 4.4 in the District of Columbia to 22.2 in Mississippi. The death rate per 100 million miles traveled ranged from 0.54 in Massachusetts to 1.83 in South Carolina.





















Population, fatal motor vehicle crashes, motor vehicle crash deaths and motor vehicle crash death rates per state, 2018
State Population Vehicle miles traveled (millions) Fatal crashes Deaths Deaths per 100,000 population Deaths per 100 million vehicle miles traveled
Alabama 4,887,871 71,167 876 953 19.5 1.34
Alaska 737,438 5,487 69 80 10.8 1.46
Arizona 7,171,646 66,145 916 1,010 14.1 1.53
Arkansas 3,013,825 36,675 472 516 17.1 1.41
California 39,557,045 348,796 3,259 3,563 9.0 1.02
Colorado 5,695,564 53,954 588 632 11.1 1.17
Connecticut 3,572,665 31,596 276 294 8.2 0.93
Delaware 967,171 10,179 104 111 11.5 1.09
District of Columbia 702,455 3,691 30 31 4.4 0.84
Florida 21,299,325 221,816 2,915 3,133 14.7 1.41
Georgia 10,519,475 131,456 1,407 1,504 14.3 1.14
Hawaii 1,420,491 10,887 110 117 8.2 1.07
Idaho 1,754,208 17,709 212 231 13.2 1.30
Illinois 12,741,080 107,954 948 1,031 8.1 0.96
Indiana 6,691,878 81,529 774 858 12.8 1.05
Iowa 3,156,145 33,282 291 318 10.1 0.96
Kansas 2,911,505 32,190 366 404 13.9 1.26
Kentucky 4,468,402 49,544 664 724 16.2 1.46
Louisiana 4,659,978 50,045 716 768 16.5
Apr
12

Washington State Department Of Transportation

Actually the most affordable private transport contraption is the pedal-powered bicycle. 4) Versatility- 3PL’s permit for small, to medium dimension companies, the flexibility to align resources with business objectives. These people who are aged or disable usually require transport for medical appointments. A rocket is a vehicle that travels into the air at a very excessive pace.

Make this city’s funding in Metro repay by making bus service and RapidRide Plus extra frequent and dependable via redesigning corridors, eliminating traffic bottlenecks, optimizing sign timing, improving connections to Hyperlink Gentle rail stations, and having better pedestrian entry to transit hubs.

These excessive speed rail programs additionally transport individuals in Germany, Korea, and Spain. Learn extra about these companies in the identical manner you’d study extra about different public transportation options. The plan would increase four taxes, together with the gross sales tax, to pay for a combination of sunshine rail, rapid bus transit and bus improvements.

With delivery service firms branding their autos, workers uniforms, envelopes, bins, envelopes and even airplanes these logos have huge publicity to the general public eye in contrast with some other industries. The Eno Center for Transportation is a impartial, non-partisan suppose-tank that promotes policy innovation and offers skilled improvement alternatives throughout the career span of transportation professionals.

June 12, 2013 – Staff offered Council with an summary of recent transportation trends, and gave an update on enhancing security for folks walking and cycling. Quickly and simply report frequent service requests corresponding to potholes, graffiti, abandoned autos, streetlight outages, and illegal dumping.

For example, in sending items to a country where air travel is just not accessible, the courier will get the services of a delivery firm, and moreover, a trucker to assist in delivering the products once the ship has arrived. Low-income mother and father could apply to the DPI for reimbursement of a portion of their transportation costs.…