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Archive of posts published in the category: river
Oct
9

Ninnescah River – Wikipedia

The Ninnescah River is a river in the central Great Plains of North America. Its entire 56.4-mile (90.8 km) length lies within the U.S. state of Kansas. It is a tributary of the Arkansas River.[3]

Geography[edit]

The Ninnescah River originates in the Wellington Lowlands of south-central Kansas. It is formed in southwestern Sedgwick County by the confluence of the North Fork Ninnescah River and the South Fork Ninnescah River. From there, it flows southeast into the Arkansas River Lowlands. It empties into the Arkansas River roughly 3 miles (4.8 km) north of Oxford, Kansas in eastern Sumner County.[4]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ “Ninnescah River”. Geographic Names Information System. United States Geological Survey. Retrieved 2015-10-19.

  2. ^ “Water-Data Report 2013 – 07145500 Ninnescah River Near Peck, KS” (PDF). U.S. Geological Survey. Retrieved 2015-10-19.
  3. ^ U.S. Geological Survey. National Hydrography Dataset high-resolution flowline data. The National Map, accessed March 29, 2011
  4. ^ “2003-2004 Official Transportation Map” (PDF). Kansas Department of Transportation. Retrieved 2015-10-19.
  • Kansas: a cyclopedia of state history, embracing events, institutions, industries, counties, cities, towns, prominent persons. Standard Pub. Co. Chicago : 1912. Volume II. Page 370.

External links[edit]

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May
3

Masked riders return to Bronx River Parkway

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The 46th annual Bicycle Sunday kicked off on May 3, 2020 in Westchester County.

Rockland/Westchester Journal News

As temperatures soared into the 70s and the sun splashed over the Lower Hudson Valley, masked riders turned out for the opening of the 46th annual bicycle Sunday in Scarsdale today.

The event, which shuts down a stretch of the Bronx River Parkway, is sponsored by the Westchester Parks Foundation and Westchester County Parks and supported by donations from Con Edison.

The program continues on Sundays in May, June and September, except Memorial Day and Labor Day weekends.

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Riders enjoy the opening of the 46th annual bicycle Sunday, May 3, 2020 in White Plains. The event is sponsored by the Westchester Parks Foundation and Westchester County Parks and supported by generous donations from Con Edison. The program continues Sundays in May, June and September Ð except Memorial Day and Labor Day weekends. The course will be slightly modified this year, beginning at Main Street in White Plains (instead of Westchester County Center) and continue south to Scarsdale Road in Yonkers. Face coverings are highly recommended and parking is free at the Westchester County Center parking lot during the pandemic.  (Photo: Mark Vergari/The Journal News)

BICYCLE SUNDAYS: Westchester riders to pedal through pandemic

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The course is slightly modified this year, beginning at Main Street in White Plains, instead of the Westchester County Center, and continuing south to Scarsdale Road in Yonkers.

Face coverings are required and parking is free at the Westchester County Center parking lot during the pandemic.

Read or Share this story: https://www.lohud.com/story/news/local/westchester/2020/05/03/bicycle-sundays-masked-riders-return-bronx-river-parkway/3074847001/

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Apr
17

MCTS worker missing for 3 weeks found dead in Menomonee River

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The body of a Milwaukee County Transit System worker missing for more than three weeks was found in the Menomonee River.

The Milwaukee County Medical Examiner on Wednesday identified Jerome F. Wasielewski, 56, as the person found Sunday floating in the Menomonee River.

The Milwaukee man was last seen leaving the transit system’s administration building on March 20 and later reported missing by his supervisor. Sunday afternoon an anonymous caller reported seeing a body in the river while riding their bicycle on the Hank Aaron Trail.

Wasielewski was found in the water near the 16th Street Viaduct and Canal Street. He was identified through a driver’s license found in his wallet. There were no apparent signs of trauma, according to the medical examiner’s report. 

Our subscribers make this reporting possible. Please consider supporting local journalism by subscribing to the Journal Sentinel at jsonline.com/deal.

Read or Share this story: https://www.jsonline.com/story/news/crime/2020/04/15/mcts-worker-missing-3-weeks-found-dead-menomonee-river/5140716002/

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Apr
2

river, sea, oceans, important, largest, types, system, marine, human

Historically, societies have always located near water, due partly to the
fact that water enables more efficient travel compared to going over land.
Waterways are critically important to the transportation of people and
goods throughout the world. The complex network of connections between
coastal ports, inland ports, rail, air, and truck routes forms a
foundation of material economic wealth worldwide.

Within the United States, waterways have been developed and integrated
into a world-class transportation system that has been instrumental in the
country’s economic development. Today, there are more than 17,700
kilometers of commercially important navigation channels in the lower 48
states.

Early History of Water-based Transportation

The historical development of water-based transportation is connected to
the importance of domestic and international trade. Early exploration of
North America identified large amounts of natural resources such as
fisheries, timber, and furs. Trade centers were established along the
east coast of North America where goods could be gathered together and
ocean vessels could transport them to consumers in Europe and other
foreign areas. The success of commercial trading companies spurred the
introduction of

Waterways in developing countries are critical avenues for local and regional commerce. Fruit and vegetable vendors flock to floating markets on rivers and canals, such as this one in Bangkok, Thailand.

Waterways in developing countries are critical avenues for local
and regional commerce. Fruit and vegetable vendors flock to floating
markets on rivers and canals, such as this one in Bangkok, Thailand.

more colonial settlements that in turn resulted in additional increases
in population, economic activity, and trade.

From the sixteenth to the eighteenth centuries, small subsistence farms
were prevalent among the American colonies. Eventually larger farms
emerged and produced crops such as wheat, tobacco, rice, indigo, and
cotton that were commercially marketable in Europe. Ocean vessels
transported the bulk, low-value goods from the colonies to Europe and
returned with high-value, low-density goods such as inks, linens, and
finished products that had a much higher return on the investment per
vessel trip.

Agricultural production continued to grow and support the growing
colonies’ economic development. The speed and low cost of
transporting goods by water influenced the locations of population
settlements near navigable water (rivers, lakes, canals, and oceans).
Goods produced on inland farms were transported via inland waterways to
the coastal ports. Goods shipped by smaller vessels from surrounding
ports were transported to New York, Boston, and Philadelphia, and
exported on larger oceangoing ships. These ships from the smaller ports
then transported imported goods back to the surrounding ports.

During the 1700s, the British government passed many acts, such as the
Navigation Acts and the Stamp Act of 1765, designed to collect taxes
from the colonists. The acts affected trade, and were met with
opposition from the colonist. In Philadelphia during the fall of 1774,
the “Declarations and Resolves of the First Continental
Congress” called for non-importation of British goods, and became
a catalyst for the American Revolutionary War (1775–1784). The
resulting independence for the United States allowed trade a free rein,
and it flourished.

Westward Expansion.

The westward expansion of the United States exposed a wealth of natural
resources and an increased production in agricultural goods. The inland
transportation infrastructure