June 22, 2021
11 11 11 AM
Arizona police shoot suspect who struck multiple cyclists with vehicle
Flying Car Makers Want to Build ‘Uber Meets Tesla in the Air’
30 Fayetteville businesses receive bicycle friendly awards
Tesla launches its fastest car, the Model S Plaid
Federal regulators warn of risks to firefighters from electrical vehicle fires
House transportation bill a loser for consumers
Boyfriend of woman found shot to death in wrecked car is charged with murder
Bike to Play – How Did Bicycling Celebrate Bike to Play Week?
Tesla-inspired automotive designs that show why this company is at the peak of modern innovation: Part 3
Scooters A Viable Mode of Transportation In Omaha
Latest Post
Arizona police shoot suspect who struck multiple cyclists with vehicle Flying Car Makers Want to Build ‘Uber Meets Tesla in the Air’ 30 Fayetteville businesses receive bicycle friendly awards Tesla launches its fastest car, the Model S Plaid Federal regulators warn of risks to firefighters from electrical vehicle fires House transportation bill a loser for consumers Boyfriend of woman found shot to death in wrecked car is charged with murder Bike to Play – How Did Bicycling Celebrate Bike to Play Week? Tesla-inspired automotive designs that show why this company is at the peak of modern innovation: Part 3 Scooters A Viable Mode of Transportation In Omaha
May
2020
8

The Coronavirus Pandemic Is Forcing Cities To Rethink Public Transportation

As parts of Europe and the United States begin to lift coronavirus lockdown restrictions and allow people to go shopping, visit relatives and return to work, public officials are facing a new conundrum: How can people travel safely in crowded cities?

Italy is poised to serve as a major test case. On Sunday, Prime Minister Giuseppe Conte announced that many restrictions on daily life will be eased starting next Monday, but he warned that people would still need to avoid large gatherings, maintain social distancing and wear masks in certain circumstances.

“If we do not respect the precautions, the curve will go up, the deaths will increase and we will have irreversible damage to our economy,” Conte said in a televised address to the nation. “If you love Italy, keep your distance.”

People walk to the San Giovanni metro station in Rome on April 24 during a three-hour testing period of new measures designed



People walk to the San Giovanni metro station in Rome on April 24 during a three-hour testing period of new measures designed to reduce congestion on public transportation, April 24.

Some 2.7 million Italians are expected to return to work next week, with 15% of them anticipated to use public transportation, according to Italian authorities.

Thus, government officials and business leaders are scrambling to develop protocols to allow people to move about freely without triggering a surge in coronavirus infections.

Under new guidelines that are being considered, the number of people allowed on buses and trains is likely to be restricted. Markers will be placed on the ground in metro stations to enforce social distancing, and camera systems and personnel will be deployed to help count passengers and prevent overcrowding, according to HuffPost Italy.

Italy’s transport ministry has suggested that electronic ticket machines will likely become standard, with hand sanitizer dispensers installed nearby. Trains and buses will be disinfected regularly, and the way passengers board and exit vehicles and stations will be adjusted. Moreover, a key goal of any plan will be to spread out daily commuters in order to reduce congestion.

Already, new measures are being tested in Rome. During a three-hour testing period on Friday, only 30 passengers were allowed into stations every three minutes at two of the city’s metro lines, and the number of passengers on each train was capped at 150, HuffPost Italy reported. On the train platforms, blue stripes with small dots indicated how far apart passengers needed to stand. Passages connecting the two lines were closed to prevent people from crossing each other and creating crowds.

A man rides a bicycle on an empty Corso Garibaldi, a main road in the center of Milan, on February 26. In response to th



A man rides a bicycle on an empty Corso Garibaldi, a main road in the center of Milan, on February 26. In response to the coronavirus pandemic, the city plans to increase bike lanes and pedestrian paths and discourage car use.

In addition, many cities are hoping to encourage people to use alternate forms of transportation. Bologna has requested support from the federal government for the purchase of e-bikes and electric scooters, for example, and Milan has unveiled an ambitious plan to remake