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Archive of posts published in the category: Requirements
Apr
10

Vehicle Registration Requirements & Information

Vehicle Registration Summary:

Information about the cost of new car tags/vehicle registration can be found by clicking on your state. Find out if you’ll receive a temporary license plate/temporary tags while you wait for your permanent registration to arrive. You may find that your state offers a vehicle registration fee calculator to make it easy to determine your total registration cost.

Vehicle Registration

After you buy a car, you’ll need to register it with your local Department of Motor Vehicles (DMV), Secretary of State (SOS), Department of Revenue (DOR), Motor Vehicle Division (MVD), or other local entity that sets vehicle regulations in your state. If someone is asking for your vehicle registration number, they are probably referring to your Vehicle Identification (VIN) number.

Before you can register your car, your vehicle will likely need to:

  • Have a title in your name.
  • Pass an emissions test or smog check.
  • Pass a vehicle safety inspection.
  • Be covered by car insurance.
Find an auto insurance policy that’s right for you.
Get car insurance quotes with our insurance center and find your perfect policy.

Register Your Car in Your State

Did you know? Branded Titles

If you want to register a vehicle with a branded title, abandoned vehicle title, or a salvage title, be sure to contact your state DMV/motor vehicle agency before visiting your local office. There may be special forms and registration fees you’ll need to provide to your state motor vehicle agency.

Whether you want to register a car, truck, motorcycle, ATV/recreational vehicle, or trailer, visit your state’s vehicle registration page for more information about:

  • Registration documents.
  • Vehicle registration forms.
  • Registration fees.
  • County/state taxes, if applicable.

Click on your state below to find out how to register your vehicle with your local DMV.

Source Article

Apr
5

Florida Car Insurance – Quotes, Coverage & Requirements

Florida Car Insurance


Florida law requires residents of FL to have car insurance. You must purchase the minimum coverage amounts for both personal injury protection (PIP) insurance and property damage liability (PDL) car insurance.


Luckily, Florida offsets this coverage requirement by offering some of the lowest car insurance coverage minimums in the country.


Learn more about Florida’s car insurance requirements, the effects of traffic violations on premium costs, and how to get the best quotes on car insurance available.

FL Auto Insurance Requirements


Florida is a
no-fault insurance state. If you are injured in an accident, your car insurance will pay your medical costs up to your policy’s limits, regardless of who caused the accident.


The
minimum limits for Florida car insurance coverage are:

  • $10,000 of no-fault or personal injury protection (PIP) insurance.
  • $10,000 of property damage liability (PDL) insurance.

Personal Injury Protection


In addition to covering your part of any medical expenses and income loss that result from a car accident, your
Personal Injury Protection, or PIP, insurance will also cover:

  • Your child and other members of your household.
  • Your child (when he or she is riding on a school bus).
  • You (when you are a pedestrian or bicyclist involved in a car accident.)
  • Passengers in your car who do not have their own PIP insurance and do not own a car.


Anyone in your car who has PIP car insurance will be covered by his or her own policy if you get in a car accident. Likewise, your PIP car insurance will cover you while you are a passenger in someone else’s car.

Property Damage Liability


Property Damage Liability (PDL) auto insurance in Florida will cover you for damages you cause in a car accident to someone else’s property, such as homes or buildings.

Violation Penalties and Fines


The Florida
Department of Highway Safety and Motor Vehicles (DHSMV) requires your insurance company to electronically notify them if there is a cancellation of your insurance policy.


If the DHSMV has
no record of your current car insurance policy, you will be notified by mail. The notification will give you a date of suspension. If you are not able to provide the DHSMV a proof of insurance before the suspension date, your driver’s license, plates, and registration will all be suspended.


To
reinstate these, you will have to provide proof of Florida insurance and pay a fee of:

  • $150 for your first offense.
  • $250 for your second offense.
  • $500 for each offense after.


If you are able to provide proof of insurance to the DHSMV
before the date of suspension, you will not face any penalties.


You can provide your proof of insurance:


If you no longer own the car, surrender your plates and registration to the Florida DHSMV to avoid suspension of your FL

Mar
31

Vehicle & Equipment Requirements – WSP

Washington’s standards for tire chains, studded tires, and their use and approval can be found in Chapter 204-24 WAC.

What qualifies as traction devices? 

The following equipment items are approved for use as traction devices wherever traction devices are required by WSDOT:
• Tire chains (WAC 204-24-020)
• Studded tires (WAC 204-24-030)
• Traction tires –Tires labeled as all–season, all–weather, snow tire or studded (must be labeled M+S or with the mountain/snowflake symbol on the sidewall) qualify so long as they meet the standards for traction devices as set in WAC 204–24–040.

More information on approved traction devices, please visit WAC 204-24-040.

When can I use studded tires?

Studded tires are approved for use from November 1 to March 31. WSDOT determines additional periods in which they can be used.

There is nothing in the law that provides for any special permits or exceptions for driving with studded tires – even for out-of-state visitors – outside of the time periods identified by the WSDOT.  No personal exemptions or waivers are issued.

Studded tires are not allowed on vehicles over 10,000 pounds. For more information see WSDOT’s studded tire page.

I drive a vehicle with studded tires. When WSDOT requires chains to be put on, do I need them with studded tires?

Yes. Studded tires are not a substitute for chains.

Am I required to carry chains in my vehicle?

It’s important for all vehicles to be prepared to have adequate tires and equipment when traveling over the passes. Chain law and traction devices requirements can be put into effect at any time for all types of vehicles.

All vehicles and combinations of vehicles over 10,000 pounds must carry sufficient tire trains to meet the requirements of WAC 204-24-050 from November 1 to April 1 of each year.

Studded tires do not satisfy state chain requirements. If chains are required on your vehicle, you’ll have to install them even on studded tires.

I have an all–wheel or four–wheel drive vehicle.  When “Chains Required” signs are posted, do I have to use chains?

WAC 204–24–050 states:
• All AWD or 4WD vehicles under 10,000 pounds gross vehicle weight (GVW) are exempt from chain requirements when all wheels are in gear and are equipped with approved traction devices, provided that tire chains for at least one set of drive tires are carried in the vehicle.
• If your AWD or 4WD vehicle vehicle has over a 10,000 pound gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) you MUST install chains.

I can’t use regular cable chains because there’s not enough clearance in the wheel well. What other approved traction devices can I use?

It is recommended the vehicle consult their owner’s manual to see what the manufacturer suggests be used as a traction device for their vehicle. The following alternative traction devices are certified by their manufacturer as meeting or exceeding chain requirements in accordance with WAC 204-24-035 which are therefore considered approved for use when “Chains Required” signs are posted in Washington State provided that

Mar
30

Bicycle Requirements Business Guidance | CPSC.gov

What is the purpose of the requirements for bicycles?

This regulation increases the safety of bicycles by establishing, among other things, requirements for assembly, braking, protrusions, structural integrity and reflectors. Bicycles that fail any of the requirements are banned under the Federal Hazardous Substances Act.

 

Where can I find the requirements for bicycles?

The requirements are in the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) in Title 16, Part 1512.

 

What is a bicycle?

A bicycle is defined in §1512.2 as either (1) a two-wheeled vehicle having a rear drive wheel solely human-powered; or (2) a two- or three-wheeled vehicle with fully operable pedals and an electric motor of less than 750 watts (1 h.p.), whose maximum speed on a paved level surface, when powered solely by such a motor while ridden by an operator who weighs 170 pounds, is less than 20 mph.

 

The bicycle requirements cover two different types of bicycles. Those with a seat that is more than 25 inches above the ground when the seat is adjusted to its highest position must meet all of the requirements.  Sidewalk bicycles – those with a seat height of 25 inches or less – are exempt from some of the requirements or have other alternative requirements.  These exemptions and alternatives are marked in bold type in this summary. Please consult §1512.2 of the requirements for more information on how to measure seat height.

 

Are any bicycles exempt from the requirements?

Yes.  Track bicycles designed and intended for use in competition that have tubular tires, a single crank–towheel ratio, and no freewheeling feature are exempt. So are one-of-a-kind bicycles made to the order of an individual without assembling stock or production parts.

 

How are bicycles tested in general?

Assembled bicycles must meet the requirements of the regulation in the condition in which they are offered for sale.  Unassembled or partially assembled bicycles must meet the requirements after assembly according to the manufacturer’s instructions.

Illustration of a bicycle and its parts

Figure 1 – Illustration of a bicycle and its parts

 

 

Are there any general requirements that bicycles must meet?

Yes.

 

 

(1) Adults of normal intelligence and ability must be able to assemble a bicycle that requires assembly.

 

 

(2) A bicycle may not have unfinished sheared metal edges or other sharp parts that may cut a rider’s hands or legs.  Sheared metal edges must be rolled or finished to remove burrs or feathering.

 

 

(3) When the bicycle is tested for braking (§1512.18(d) and/or (e)) or road  performance (§1512.18(p) or (q)), neither the frame, nor any steering part, wheel, pedal, crank, or braking system part may show a visible break.

 

 

(4) Screws, bolts, and nuts used to fasten parts may not loosen, break, or fail during testing.

 

 

(5) Control cables must be routed so that they do not fray from contact with fixed parts of a bicycle or with the ends of the cable sheaths.  The ends of control cables must be capped or treated so that they do not unravel.

 

 

(6) A bicycle may not have any protrusions within the