October 21, 2021
11 11 11 AM
Rekor Systems Announces Selection of Waycare Technologies by Louisiana Department of Transportation and Development for Pilot Program to Reduce State Traffic Congestion and Crashes
California homeless camp fire damages 2 bridges, disrupts public transportation
Austin finishes half of its bicycle network, expects to complete entire 400-mile system by 2025
The Top 10 Automotive Concepts that automotive enthusiasts will be itching to see on the road!
Oregon Transportation Commission, wary of I-5 Rose Quarter project’s growing price tag, grants conditional approval
Woman dies after being hit by car in North Windham Friday night
Silk-FAW Continues To Poach Italy’s Automotive Talent, As Lamborghini’s Katia Bassi Joins As Managing Director
Transportation Department cracks down on airlines withholding refunds for canceled flights
Bear gets trapped in car, destroys interior
Cycling apparel company adding full-service bike repair to visitor center
Latest Post
Rekor Systems Announces Selection of Waycare Technologies by Louisiana Department of Transportation and Development for Pilot Program to Reduce State Traffic Congestion and Crashes California homeless camp fire damages 2 bridges, disrupts public transportation Austin finishes half of its bicycle network, expects to complete entire 400-mile system by 2025 The Top 10 Automotive Concepts that automotive enthusiasts will be itching to see on the road! Oregon Transportation Commission, wary of I-5 Rose Quarter project’s growing price tag, grants conditional approval Woman dies after being hit by car in North Windham Friday night Silk-FAW Continues To Poach Italy’s Automotive Talent, As Lamborghini’s Katia Bassi Joins As Managing Director Transportation Department cracks down on airlines withholding refunds for canceled flights Bear gets trapped in car, destroys interior Cycling apparel company adding full-service bike repair to visitor center
Sep
2021
16

California homeless camp fire damages 2 bridges, disrupts public transportation

Two bridges were damaged and public transportation was disrupted Wednesday when a fire broke out in a Northern California homeless encampment. 

The large blaze was initially reported at 12:45 a.m. along a large encampment under a Sacramento light rail overpass near Interstate 80, Sacramento Fire Department Capt. Keith Wade told Fox News. 

A massive plume of smoke could be seen from the freeway. Footage of the aftermath taken by KCRA-TV showed several larges tires burned and multiple vehicles charred underneath the overpass where the heat caused chunks of concrete to fall. 

The blaze appeared to have traveled up an embankment and burned some vegetation. 

Around 36 firefighters responded to the scene. They were told a female took herself to a hospital but her injuries were not clear, Wade said. No other injuries were reported.

Two bridges were damaged and light rail traffic was briefly suspended. Engineers walked the rails and deemed them safe for the morning commute but are expected to check for long-term damage, according to the news outlet.

Fox News has reached out to the California Department of Transportation. 

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP 

One person told the news outlet that at least 40 people were displaced from the encampment. 

Sep
2021
3

Public invited to comment on expanding bicycle use on conservation areas

The Missouri Conservation Commission gave initial approval to the Missouri Department of Conservation at its Aug. 27 open meeting on proposed regulation changes that would allow the expanded use of bicycles and electric bicycles on most department-area service roads and multi-use trails.

The Commission also gave initial approval to Missouri Department of Conservation definitions of bicycles and electric bicycles.

According to Missouri Department of Conservation, conservation-area users have expressed interest in expanding the use of bicycles and electric bicycles to include conservation-area service roads and multi-use trails for greater access to the areas.

Bicycle use on Missouri Department of Conservation’s approximately 1,100 conservation areas is currently restricted to roads open to public-vehicle traffic and some multi-use trails. Bicycle use is currently not allowed on conservation-area service roads.

Service roads are non-public roads on Missouri Department of Conservation areas used by staff to conduct resource management activities.

They are marked on online maps on the Missouri Department of Conservation website at mdc.mo.gov/discover-nature/places. Some service roads are currently used as walking paths by the public.

Missouri Department of Conservation notes that conditions of service roads on department areas vary and are not maintained at the level of public-use trails and public roads.

Most state conservation areas do not have applicable service roads or multi-use trails.

The regulation change will impact approximately 300 Missouri Department of Conservation areas by allowing bicycle and electric bicycle use on service roads and/or multi-use trails.

Approximately 30 of these areas will be closed to bicycle and electric bicycle use during all portions of the firearms deer hunting season and the spring turkey hunting seasons.

Exceptions would also include service roads used by staff at fish hatcheries and other heavily used Missouri Department of Conservation areas or where bicycle use could cause damage to sensitive habitats, such as designated natural areas.  

Electric bicycles are defined by Missouri Department of Conservation as “any two-wheeled or three-wheeled device equipped with fully operable pedals, a saddle or seat for the rider, and an electric motor of less than 750 watts, and which meets one of the following three classes:

Class 1 electric bicycles are equipped with a motor that provides assistance only when the rider is pedaling, and that ceases to provide assistance when the bicycle reaches a speed of 20 miles per hour.

Class 2 electric bicycles are equipped with a motor that may be used exclusively to propel the bicycle, and that is not capable of providing assistance when the bicycle reaches the speed of 20 miles per hour.

Class 3 electric bicycles are equipped with a motor that provides assistance only when the rider is pedaling, and that ceases to provide assistance when the bicycle reaches the speed of 28 miles per hour.”

The next step in the rulemaking process is for Missouri Department of Conservation to have a public comment period during October.

Missouri Department of Conservation invites online review of the full regulation proposal and public comments October 1-31 at mdc.mo.gov/about-regulations/wildlife-code-missouri/proposed-regulation-changes.

Comments received during this comment

Aug
2021
27

Springfield Public Schools changes bus transportation policies

SPRINGFIELD, Mo. — As summer break comes to a close for kids in Springfield they’re going into the year with brand new bus transportation rules.

The Springfield Public Schools District says before the changes it had one of the most restrictive policies in the state on who could take the bus to school.

Families had to live three miles or more from their kid’s schools to be eligible to take the school bus. Springfield Public Schools changed the start time for elementary, middle, and high school this year so that more students could have the option of school bus transportation.

The new change allows 3,000 additional high schoolers to use a school bus to get to and from school.

” Students who have been walking, some over three miles to school each and every day,” said Stephen Hall, chief communications officer. “Their parents may or may not have a reliable car that would allow them to drop their child off at school every day. So when you think about children walking three-plus miles to school, they may or may not have a sidewalk. That’s not optimal, that’s not necessarily safe for our students.”

Those new start times for schools are:

Aug
2021
24

There Are a Lot of Incentives Out There for Folks Returning to Public Transportation and Green Commuting

Photograph by ablokhin/via iStock.

Whether working from home or wanting to avoid contact with other people, the pandemic drastically decreased ridership on public transportation. As we reported last week, Metro cited rail ridership down 83 percent over 2019 and bus ridership down 65 percent.

Here are a few incentives to get you out of a car and back into public transportation:

Get 10 free Capital Bikeshare rides

Sign up for a virtual SmarTrip card or transfer your physical card to mobile pay and get 10 free rides from Capital Bikeshare. The free rides can be up to 30 minutes long, and they are valid for 30 days. Activate your free pedal ride through your Capital Bikeshare or Lyft account, and you can upgrade to an e-bike for $1. The promotion is available through December.

Win a prize for going car-free in Montgomery County

The Rockville and Shady Grove Metro stations will be closed for three months starting in September. Instead of hopping in your car, the Montgomery County Department of Transportation is offering prizes to those who travel by bike. Now through September 26, submit a photo of your bike ride for a chance to win a “bicycle swag bag” prize.

Pay less for better access on Metro rails

Starting September 5, all weekend rides will cost $2 no matter the distance. Metro is also promising the wait time between trains will only be three to six minutes at stations where multiple lines come through. And good news for both early birds and night owls: new weekend hours mean stations will stay open until 1 a.m. on Fridays and Saturdays, and they’ll open back up at 7 a.m. on Sundays.

Transfer for free from bus to rail

Once the train takes you as far as it can, get closer to your destination with a free transfer to a Metro bus starting September 5. There will be more frequent service at the popular lines, and now a seven-day regional bus pass is only $12, or $6 for seniors and those with disabilities.

Aug
2021
23

TSA extends mask mandate for public transportation vehicles, stations

Face coverings are required for passengers and operators while on properties, buses, trains or paratransit vehicles operated by Dallas Area Rapid Transit, Denton County Transportation Authority and Trinity Metro. (Erick Pirayesh/Community Impact Newspaper)

The federal Transportation Security Administration announced Aug. 20 that it will continue its face mask requirement for travelers using all transportation networks through Jan. 18.

Face coverings are required for passengers and operators while on properties, buses, trains or paratransit vehicles operated by Dallas Area Rapid Transit, Denton County Transportation Authority and Trinity Metro.

Passengers who refuse to wear a mask, unless exempted or excluded under Centers for Disease Control and Prevention guidelines, will be in violation of federal law, and failure to comply will result in denial of boarding or removal, according to a DART news release. Those passengers may also be subject to federal penalties.

DART offers hand sanitizer on all its buses, light-rail vehicles and Dallas streetcars, while DCTA and Trinity Metro have installed dispensers in all vehicles and agency facilities.

This marks the second time TSA’s mask requirement has been extended since it was issued Jan. 31.

More information about DART’s safety precautions is available here. Additional information about DCTA’s response to COVID-19 is available here. Information about Trinity Metro’s response to the pandemic is available here.

Aug
2021
18

Omaha Public Schools shares update on transportation services

Omaha Public schools earlier this summer said it anticipated transportation staffing challenges this year because of the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic.OPS said in a statement Thursday it is working proactively to fill positions before the school year begins but like others nationwide it will start the school year with fewer drivers than needed to supports its bus routes.They say this will have a direct impact on the transportation services and students can expect longer ride times and delays due to the shortage of drivers.As the school year is set to begin OPS said it will continue to update families on potential impacts as the year begins and encourages families to maintain communication with their students’ school to work through transportation challenges OPS’s transportations call center staff is available at 531-299-0140.

Omaha Public schools earlier this summer said it anticipated transportation staffing challenges this year because of the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic.

OPS said in a statement Thursday it is working proactively to fill positions before the school year begins but like others nationwide it will start the school year with fewer drivers than needed to supports its bus routes.

They say this will have a direct impact on the transportation services and students can expect longer ride times and delays due to the shortage of drivers.

As the school year is set to begin OPS said it will continue to update families on potential impacts as the year begins and encourages families to maintain communication with their students’ school to work through transportation challenges

OPS’s transportations call center staff is available at 531-299-0140.

Jul
2021
25

Avoid crowded public transportation with Google Maps’ new features. Here’s how

Google Maps now serves up transit crowd predictions in 100 countries. 


Angela Lang/CNET

Google Maps is adding transit crowd predictions covering 10,000 transit systems in 100 countries, making it easier for you to tell how busy your train or subway line will be, even down to each car. 

The transit predictions are based on AI technology, user feedback and location trends over time, the search giant said Wednesday. And in New York and Sydney, the crowdedness indicator goes down to a car-by-car level — so you’ll have an idea of which parts of the train to avoid. 

Transit ridership plunged during the pandemic, but as vaccines roll out in many areas worldwide, use of transit directions on Google Maps has increased 50% compared to last year in the US, according to Google. But even as we return to our normal travels, it will still take time for many people to feel comfortable in crowded places like a packed subway. 

While the Google Maps update is now available for iOS and Android users, Android users who enable location tracking will also see a new tab in your timeline with traveling trends based on your location history. You’ll be able to see how much time is spent at your favorite shops, and which modes of transportation you used most. Google Maps also lets you relive past trips by saving places from your timeline and sharing them with friends. 

Google said privacy and security remain a priority, and that the Maps update will use anonymization technology and differential privacy to keep your location history private.

We’ll show you how to easily use these new features for a smoother trip. If Google’s predictions are right, you’ll have a comfier commute (and hopefully a seat). You can also see our favorite Google Maps tricks and how to stop Google from tracking you (Hint: You’ll need to do more than disable your location).

How to check for crowded public transportation with Google Maps

train-level-crowdedness-max-1000x1000.png

Check how crowded a train is with a Google Maps update.


Google

1. Open Maps, type in your destination and tap Directions

2. At the top of the screen, select your your transportation preference (for example, bus or subway).

3. Select your route, if there are multiple ways to get there. 

4. When you’re reviewing your route you’ll see a section under the public transit section that asks “What’s it like on board?” You’ll see a message that says “Not too crowded,” “Very crowded,” or other prediction messages. 

5. If you get on a train or bus that Google Maps predicts not to be too crowded, but it’s busier than the app says, you can change the prediction by tapping on the alert and selecting if it’s crowded or at capacity based on what you see. All submissions are public. 

You may also see a message that says “Public transport services are modified due

Jun
2021
17

CDC Updates COVID-19 Guidance for Mask Wearing on Outdoor Transit Hubs, Public Transportation

Fully vaccinated Americans can now ditch their masks in outdoor transit hubs and on outdoor public transportation, the Centers for Disease Control said in updated guidance issued Thursday.

The new recommendations apply to any outdoor transportation areas, like outside an airport or a bus stop, as well as outdoor areas of public transportation, like the deck of a ferry or an open-air trolley.

Unvaccinated travelers should still continue to wear their masks in all public transportation-related areas, indoors and outdoors, the agency noted.

“CDC will continue to evaluate the requirements of its Order and determine whether additional changes may be warranted,” the agency wrote. “While those who are fully vaccinated may resume many activities without wearing a mask, the travel environment presents a unique set of circumstances based on the number and close interaction of travelers (both vaccinated and unvaccinated).”

Ferry

ANGELA WEISS/AFP via Getty Images

The updated guidance comes weeks after the CDC said fully vaccinated people don’t have to wear their masks outdoors and in many indoor situations. Masks are still required on planes and inside airports, regardless of a person’s vaccination status – a rule that has been extended until at least September.

The CDC has said fully vaccinated people can travel at low risk to themselves and don’t need to quarantine upon returning from an international or domestic trip, and has loosened cruise restrictions for vaccinated travelers (like allowing them to explore ports on their own rather than book a shore excursion through the cruise line).

When it comes to vaccine progress, 64% of Americans 18 and older have received at least one dose of a vaccine, and 53.4% are considered fully vaccinated, according to the CDC.

So far, ABC News reported 13 states have vaccinated at least 70% of their adult populations with at least one dose: Pennsylvania, Vermont, Hawaii, New Hampshire, Massachusetts, Connecticut, Maine, New Jersey, Rhode Island, New Mexico, Washington, Maryland, and California.

Alison Fox is a contributing writer for Travel + Leisure. When she’s not in New York City, she likes to spend her time at the beach or exploring new destinations and hopes to visit every country in the world. Follow her adventures on Instagram.

Oct
2020
1

Transportation – Hopkinton Public School District

COVID-19 Transportation Information

The Hopkinton Public Schools, like all school districts across the Commonwealth, were charged with designing a reentry plan, unique to the needs of the Hopkinton Community, and in keeping with the “Initial Fall School Reopening Guidance”  issued by the Commissioner of Education, Jeffrey Riley on June 25, 2020.  Here is the Transportation specific information.  Please see the full reentry plan for more details.  

9/23/2020 Transportation Change Requests

9/15/20 New Legacy North Bus Stops

9/14/2020 Transportation Reminders

9/7/2020 Transportation Welcome Back letter

 

New Student ID’s / Z Pass

Students will be issued a new smart Student ID.  The ID will have the student ID number as a bar code, an RFID chip and a QR code.  This ID will function as the bus pass, enable touchless payments in the cafeteria and more.  For transportation, the student ID must be scanned upon entering and exiting the bus.  The RFID chip interfaces with the new system called

Z Pass.   Z Pass ridership capability enables the district to know who is on the bus and where and when they entered or exited. The information is transmitted to a secure database.  The transportation department will use this information to locate a rider, and improve routes and utilization.  This will increase safety and efficiency for the district.  The Student ID will come hole punched for attaching  to backpacks, lanyards etc.  Students must have their ID at all times for riding the bus.  There will be a replacement fee charged for lost or damaged cards.

 

The district provides transportation to students in grades Kindergarten (K) through grade six (6).  Students in grades seven (7) through twelve (12) must purchase a bus pass to be eligible for transportation. Every effort will be made to provide safe, comfortable and pleasant transportation service while maintaining an appropriate level of efficiency. 

Effective transportation service requires cooperation among bus drivers & staff, school administrators, students and parents/guardians.  Transportation rules and procedures are provided so you can be familiar with our expectations and the transportation procedures.  The bus is an extension of the classroom and the bus driver is an extension of the teacher, thus all district policies are also observed on district transportation.

The Transportation Office is located in the HPS Central Administration building at 
89 Hayden Rowe Street, Hopkinton, MA.

The new Student ID must be scanned upon entering and exiting the bus.  All students should be at their designated bus stop 5-10 minutes before their scheduled pick-up time.  It is the parent responsibility to get students to and from the bus stop.  Bus routes will be published the last week of August.  Please see below for additional information based on your student grade level.

GRADES K-5          GRADE 6          GRADES 7-12

 

Additional Information:

BUS CONDUCT ITEMS ALLOWED ON THE BUS PARKING PASS

 KINDERGARTEN PROTOCOLS TRANSPORTATION FAQ’s

Transportation Forms:

Application for Bus Pass (PAPER)      Bus Stop Review Request Form

PAY ONLINE USING THE MYSCHOOLBUCKS LINK BELOW – FOLLOW DIRECTIONS ON HOW TO PAY ONLINE HERE. 

OR PAPER APPLICATION BUTTON

Aug
2020
19

Phoenix Public Transportation | Get Around With Bus & Rail

  • Need to get from the airport to your downtown hotel? It will cost you $2 if you take Phoenix’s Valley Metro light-rail system. The cost of an all-day pass is $4.

  • But getting from the airport to downtown affordably is just one of light rail’s perks. The 28-mile line links Phoenix to the neighboring communities of Tempe and Mesa, and includes stops at attractions such as Phoenix Art Museum, Heard Museum, Chase Field, Talking Stick Resort Arena and Tempe’s Mill Avenue.

  • Light rail’s quiet, air-conditioned trains operate 18-22 hours per day, seven days a week, and stop every 12-20 minutes. The system operates at street level and is powered by electricity from overhead wires.

  • There are 38 stations along the line, and they are adorned with $8 million worth of public art. The artwork at each station reflects the character of the community where it is located. Station platforms can accommodate the boarding of 600 passengers onto a three-car train within 30 seconds. 

  • Convenient transportation to the airport comes by way of PHX Sky Train. This driverless people mover transports Valley Metro Light Rail passengers to the airport from the 44th Street/Washington Street station.

  • Maps


  • Source Article