September 17, 2021
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California homeless camp fire damages 2 bridges, disrupts public transportation
Austin finishes half of its bicycle network, expects to complete entire 400-mile system by 2025
The Top 10 Automotive Concepts that automotive enthusiasts will be itching to see on the road!
Oregon Transportation Commission, wary of I-5 Rose Quarter project’s growing price tag, grants conditional approval
Woman dies after being hit by car in North Windham Friday night
Silk-FAW Continues To Poach Italy’s Automotive Talent, As Lamborghini’s Katia Bassi Joins As Managing Director
Transportation Department cracks down on airlines withholding refunds for canceled flights
Bear gets trapped in car, destroys interior
Cycling apparel company adding full-service bike repair to visitor center
German sales plunge in August to lowest level since 1992
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California homeless camp fire damages 2 bridges, disrupts public transportation Austin finishes half of its bicycle network, expects to complete entire 400-mile system by 2025 The Top 10 Automotive Concepts that automotive enthusiasts will be itching to see on the road! Oregon Transportation Commission, wary of I-5 Rose Quarter project’s growing price tag, grants conditional approval Woman dies after being hit by car in North Windham Friday night Silk-FAW Continues To Poach Italy’s Automotive Talent, As Lamborghini’s Katia Bassi Joins As Managing Director Transportation Department cracks down on airlines withholding refunds for canceled flights Bear gets trapped in car, destroys interior Cycling apparel company adding full-service bike repair to visitor center German sales plunge in August to lowest level since 1992
Aug
2021
16

Bicycle & Pedestrian Fatal Crashes Up in Texas

AUSTIN, TX ­– Despite a decrease in traffic crashes in 2020, Texas saw a dramatic rise in the number of people killed walking and biking on our roadways. Last year, 731 people died in pedestrian-related crashes, an increase of 9% from 2019. Crashes involving bicyclists claimed the lives of 82 people, up from 68 deaths the previous year. These numbers reflect an alarming trend of pedestrian and bicyclist fatalities increasing over the last five years.

Pedestrian and bicyclist deaths account for one in five of all traffic fatalities in the state. Safety officials attribute this growing concern to people’s widespread failure to follow state laws designed to protect pedestrians and bicyclists. To that end, the Texas Department of Transportation is kicking off a public awareness campaign this month that urges all Texans to walk smart, bike smart and drive smart.

“More than 800 people lost their lives last year while walking and biking on Texas roads. Even one death is too many,” said TxDOT Executive Director Marc Williams. “Whether you’re behind the wheel, on foot or riding a bicycle, we’re reminding all Texans that they need to be safe and smart, and that starts with paying attention to driving and obeying traffic laws.”

As Texans head out this summer to enjoy their favorite activities, TxDOT wants them to know the laws for safe walking, biking and driving—and to follow them. Drivers are required to take specific steps to protect pedestrians and bicyclists, who are more likely to be killed or seriously injured when involved in a crash with a motor vehicle. State laws mandate stopping for pedestrians in crosswalks, yielding the right of way to pedestrians and bicyclists when turning, and passing bicyclists at a safe distance and giving them room to ride.

Like drivers, bicyclists are required to obey all traffic signs and signals, including stopping at red lights and stop signs. State laws also dictate that those who ride bicycles must use hand signals when turning or stopping, ride with traffic, use bike lanes or ride as near as possible to the right-hand curb, and when riding at night, make sure their bikes have a white light on the front and a red light or reflector on the back.

Pedestrians must cross the street only at intersections and crosswalks, obey all traffic and crosswalk signals and always use sidewalks. If there isn’t a sidewalk, pedestrians should walk on the left side of the street or road, facing oncoming traffic.

Drivers, pedestrians and bicyclists can expect to see these safety reminders on TV, billboards, gas pumps, buses and social media, as TxDOT reminds Texans to do their part to prevent pedestrian and bicyclist fatalities.

TxDOT’s “Be Safe. Drive Smart.” campaign and pedestrian and bicycle safety initiative are key components of #EndTheStreakTX, a broader social media and word-of-mouth effort that encourages drivers to make safer choices while behind the wheel such as wearing a seat belt, driving the speed limit, never texting and driving and never driving under the

Jul
2021
25

Pedestrian struck by car later dies of injuries

A Millville man has died of his injuries following an accident earlier this month in Vineland.

A 32-year-old Vineland man was driving a car west on Hance Bridge Road near Panther Road shortly after 11 p.m. on July 9 when he struck William K. Harris, 25, of Millville.

Police believe Harris was in the roadway for an unknown reason and said he was wearing non-reflective clothing. There is a minimal roadway shoulder of only a few inches width in that area, police noted in their report.

Harris was unresponsive when emergency responders arrived and was airlifted to a hospital for treatment.

He remained hospitalized until he died of his injuries on Tuesday, police said.

No charges have been filed against the driver, but the case remains under investigation.

Harris was walking home from work when he was struck, according to a manager at Eastlyn Golf Course and The Greenview Inn in Vineland, who created a GoFundMe drive to help with his medical bills.

Harris worked there and at the Double Eagle Saloon in Vineland, Dina Matias said in her fundraiser, which had collected more than $13,000 as of Friday afternoon.

Anyone with information about the crash is asked to contact Vineland Police Officer Agustin Santiago at 856-691-4111, ext. 4247.

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Matt Gray may be reached at mgray@njadvancemedia.com.

May
2020
3

NJ Bicycle and Pedestrian Resource Center






  • 2019 Complete Streets Summit

    Held on September 24, 2019, at Rutgers – New Brunswick, the 2019 New Jersey Complete Streets Summit welcomed over 300 guests and 40 speakers. Click on the image to see highlights from that day!



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    Please join us at an upcoming New Jersey Bicycle and Pedestrian Advisory Committee meeting! Click the image to read more about BPAC.



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“To motivate, educate, and empower citizens to create safer and more accessible walking and bicycling environments through cutting edge research, education, and sharing of resources.”

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View our latest reports on important bicycle-and pedestrian-related topics.

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View New Jersey specific Complete Streets policies, presentations, and workshop details.

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Learn more about the NJ Ambassadors in Motion program here!

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Find out more about statewide advocacy efforts via the New Jersey Bicycle and Pedestrian Advisory Council.

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NJ Bike/Ped Newsfeed: April 11, 2020 – April 24, 2020

NJ Bike/Ped Newsfeed: April 11, 2020 – April 24, 2020

Our regularly posted News Feed provides you with convenient links on the latest news in the bicycle and pedestrian…

Bicycle & Pedestrian COVID-19 Policy Changes Across the World

Bicycle & Pedestrian COVID-19 Policy Changes Across the World

Around the world, governments have required nonessential businesses to close and have barred citizens from gathering, as necessary precautions…

What are “Complete Industrial Streets” and how can they be used to re-incorporate industrial uses back into the fabric of the city?

What are “Complete Industrial Streets” and how can they be used to re-incorporate industrial uses back into the fabric of the city?

In order to define what Complete Industrial Streets are, and how they are applied, it becomes important to note…




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Apr
2020
17

Massachusetts to close some park roadways to expand pedestrian, bicycle access

State officials said they would close some segments of three parkways to vehicular traffic in state parks and open it up to pedestrian and bicyclists in an effort to encourage social distancing. The sections of roadways will close to vehicular traffic on Friday at dusk and the Department of Conservation and Recreation said they will evaluate the effectiveness of the measure after the weekend. DCR said it will also reduce parking capacity at state parks statewide starting Saturday, and continue the measure indefinitely.Parkways that will open to pedestrians and cyclists include:William J. Day Boulevard between Farragut Road and Shore Drive in the city of Boston (South Boston)Francis Parkman Drive between Perkins Street and the Arborway in the city of Boston (Jamaica Plain)Greenough Boulevard (Little Greenough) between Arsenal Street and North Beacon Street in WatertownThe state urges people to only visit parks that are close to home, limit excursions to short periods of time and only participate in recreational activities that are transitory in nature, such as walking, jogging and biking.DCR stresses that if a park is crowded, visitors should visit a different location or return at a later date or time.

State officials said they would close some segments of three parkways to vehicular traffic in state parks and open it up to pedestrian and bicyclists in an effort to encourage social distancing.

The sections of roadways will close to vehicular traffic on Friday at dusk and the Department of Conservation and Recreation said they will evaluate the effectiveness of the measure after the weekend.

DCR said it will also reduce parking capacity at state parks statewide starting Saturday, and continue the measure indefinitely.

Parkways that will open to pedestrians and cyclists include:

  • William J. Day Boulevard between Farragut Road and Shore Drive in the city of Boston (South Boston)
  • Francis Parkman Drive between Perkins Street and the Arborway in the city of Boston (Jamaica Plain)
  • Greenough Boulevard (Little Greenough) between Arsenal Street and North Beacon Street in Watertown

The state urges people to only visit parks that are close to home, limit excursions to short periods of time and only participate in recreational activities that are transitory in nature, such as walking, jogging and biking.

DCR stresses that if a park is crowded, visitors should visit a different location or return at a later date or time.

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Apr
2020
10

Pedestrian dies in hospital after being hit by car in Spartanburg County, troopers say

UP IN A FEW MINUTES. GEOFF: THANK YOU. A PEDESTRIAN HAS DIED ONE DAY AFTER THEY WERE HIT BY A CAR IN SPARTANBURG COUNTY. TROOPERS SAY THE ACCIDENT HAPPENED ON WOOD STREET, JUST OUTSIDE OF SPARTANBURG AROUND 11:30 P.M. MONDAY. THE PEDESTRIAN WAS TAKEN BY EMS TO A HOSPITAL, WHERE THEY DIED TUESDAY. TROOPERS SAY NO CHARGES HAVE BEEN F

Pedestrian dies in hospital after being hit by car in Spartanburg County, troopers say

John Maurice Wesley died Wednesday morning


A pedestrian died after he was hit by a car in Spartanburg County, according to highway patrol troopers.Trooper Joe Hovis says the accident happened on Wood Street, just outside of Spartanburg around 11:30 p.m. Monday.Hovis says a 2012 Nissan was traveling east on Wood Street, when it hit a pedestrian in the roadway.The pedestrian was taken by EMS to Spartanburg Medical Center, and died Wednesday morning. No charges have been filed, according to Hovis.The coroner identified the victim as John Maurice Wesley, 50, of Spartanburg. He died of blunt force trauma.

A pedestrian died after he was hit by a car in Spartanburg County, according to highway patrol troopers.

Trooper Joe Hovis says the accident happened on Wood Street, just outside of Spartanburg around 11:30 p.m. Monday.

Hovis says a 2012 Nissan was traveling east on Wood Street, when it hit a pedestrian in the roadway.

The pedestrian was taken by EMS to Spartanburg Medical Center, and died Wednesday morning.

No charges have been filed, according to Hovis.

The coroner identified the victim as John Maurice Wesley, 50, of Spartanburg.

He died of blunt force trauma.

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Apr
2020
7

Alaska Bicycle and Pedestrian Alliance

(The following article originally appeared on the Sitka Bicycle Friendly Community Coalition website, Celebrate Sitka Cycling, on May 14, 2012.)

In 2008, Sitka became the first Alaska community to earn a Bicycle Friendly Community award. On Monday, May 14, Sitka became the first Alaska community to earn a renewal of its Bicycle Friendly Community designation.

With Monday’s national announcement to kick off National Bike to Work Week, Sitka maintained its bronze level designation in the Bicycle Friendly Community program run by the League of American Bicyclists. Sitka now is one of three recognized communities in Alaska (Anchorage earned a BFC designation in 2009 and Juneau in 2011, also at the bronze level). There currently are 214 communities in 47 states with Bicycle Friendly Community designations (at the platinum, gold, silver and bronze levels). Sitka’s award is good for four years, expiring in February 2016.

“Sitka is pleased to once again receive recognition as a Bicycle Friendly Community and the first city in Alaska to be a repeat recipient,” Sitka Mayor Cheryl Westover said. “Thanks to the many Sitkans who actively support bicycling.”

“This is great news and a great time to thank everyone involved in helping us reach this Sitka Health Summit goal,” said Doug Osborne, who coordinates the Sitka Bicycle Friendly Community Coalition. “Just the other day, I heard a visitor say how neat it was to see all the people in Sitka who are getting around on bikes. I have to agree, because there so many benefits that come from biking and being a bicycle-friendly town. I’m grateful to everyone who helped us get this designation and the positive national attention that comes with it.”

Sitka first applied for the Bicycle Friendly Community program as one of the community health priority projects chosen during the 2007 Sitka Health Summit, and it was the first project completed. The 2011 Sitka Health Summit supported renewing Sitka’s status as a Bicycle Friendly Community. The 2012 Sitka Health Summit takes place on Oct. 3-6 at a variety of locations around Sitka. Over the past five years, the Sitka Health Summit resulted in high-profile projects such as starting the Sitka Farmers Market, expanding community gardens in Sitka, supporting the Hames Athletic and Wellness Center, bringing local businesses and insurance companies together to promote employee wellness programs, the Choose Respect mural about domestic violence prevention, planting fruit trees in Sitka and the award-winning Fish to Schools project.

“First and foremost, thanks to the bicycle commuters who are now riding to work at almost 10 times the national average,” Osborne said. “Secondly, thanks to the courteous motorists who are sharing the road. And lastly, thanks to all the groups, workplaces, schools, shops and individuals who have made various contributions over the years.”

In the application feedback form provided by the League of American Bicyclists, Sitka received high marks for its number of regular bike commuters (4.9 percent, nearly 10 times the national average and five times the state average), Sitka’s promotion of National Bike Month

Apr
2020
5

ADOT Bicycle and Pedestrian Program

Bicyclist Safety Action Plan cover

Bicyclist Safety Action Plan

DOWNLOAD (Large file: 16MB)

2018 Bicyclist Safety Action Plan Update uses a data-driven approach to assess bicyclist-motorist crashes on the State Highway System (SHS) during the period 2012-2016. The Plan identifies steps, actions, and potential countermeasures that, upon implementation and over time, will measurably reduce bicyclist crashes, injuries, and fatalities on the SHS.

Pedestrian Safety Action Plan cover

Development of a Bicyclist & Pedestrian Count Strategy Plan for the AZ State Highway System

DOWNLOAD (Large file: 14MB)

The ADOT Bicycle and Pedestrian Count Strategy Plan is the first step for ADOT to implement a bicycle and pedestrian count program. The program is designed to support safety assessments, performance measurement, and reporting such as key bicycle and pedestrian indicators and targets established in the ADOT Statewide Bicycle Pedestrian Plan Update.

Pedestrian Safety Action Plan cover

Pedestrian Safety Action Plan

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The 2017 Pedestrian Safety Action Plan provides a strategic action plan that effectively focuses resources to reduce the greatest number of severe injury and fatal pedestrian-motor vehicle crashes on the Arizona State Highway System.

two bicyclists riding on a highway

U.S. Bicycle Route 90

This east-west Route is 573 miles long and runs along existing state highways, local streets, and shared-use paths. U.S. Bicycle Route 90 connects the State border of New Mexico and the State border of California.


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