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Archive of posts published in the category: Institute
Jun
26

Transportation Safety Institute | US Department of Transportation

Transportation Safety Institute Welcome by Troy Jackson, Ph.D. , Director (acting)

Welcome to the Transportation Safety Institute!  The work that TSI does within the transportation safety community is truly remarkable.  With a small staff and group of highly committed subject matter experts who serve as adjunct faculty, TSI provides the best training for safety professionals in federal, state and local government agencies and the private industry. 

Recently, TSI was recognized for its training in the Transportation of Infectious Substances, such as coronavirus.  You can access the article here: https://oklahoman.com/article/5660155/coronavirus-in-oklahoma-many-people-handling-coronavirus-samples-were-trained-in-okc.  The Fox25 report can be accessed here: https://okcfox.com/news/coronavirus/okc-based-office-trains-thousands-to-safely-transport-coronavirus-tests

Whether it is face to face instruction in Oklahoma City, or anywhere else in the world, live virtual courses, or web-based training, TSI provides safety training to more than 25,000 people each year.  TSI has courses for all modes of travel, covering the transport of either people or material.  

It is our goal to provide the most up to date training possible, using the latest materials, concepts, technologies and instructional infrastructure available.  In doing so, TSI provides an invaluable service to the world’s transportation system, making it safer for all that utilize it.

I am extremely proud to be associated with my colleagues at TSI, I invite you to join us by utilizing the state of the art training we can make available to you.  Our course completion certificates carry the U.S. Department of Transportation seal and for over 40 years TSI has provided the best in transportation safety training to professionals both in and out of government.  I look forward to having you share in the TSI experience.  

 

Transportation Saftey Institute (TSI) Logo

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May
5

Victoria Transport Institute – Online TDM Encyclopedia

 

 


Online TDM Encyclopedia
Transportation Demand Management (TDM, also called Mobility Management) is a general
term for strategies that result in more efficient use of transportation
resources. This Encyclopedia is a comprehensive source of information
about innovative management solutions
to transportation problems. It provides
detailed information on dozens of demand management strategies, plus general
information on TDM planning and evaluation techniques. It is produced
by the Victoria Transport Policy Institute to increase
understanding and implementation of TDM.

Contents

Overview
Strategies To Achieve Specific Objectives
Best Strategies For Various Organizations and Stakeholder Groups
TDM Strategies

   Improved Transport Options

   Incentives To Use Alternative Modes and Reduce Driving
   Parking and Land Use Management
   Policy And Institutional Reforms
TDM Programs and Program Support
TDM Planning and Evaluation
Reference Information


Overview

These chapters describe this Encyclopedia and TDM.


Building on nearly two decades of collaboration between the transportation industry and higher education, the Transportation Institute at the University of Denver (DTI) provides graduate education designed for transportation, logistics, and supply chain professionals from a top 100 university.

The executive Master of Science in Transportation Management offers a distinctive approach to a management degree within the context of transportation, supply chain, and logistics. The graduate certificate in Supply Chain Management covers how to efficiently manage the flow of products from raw material sourcing to manufacturing, transportation, and inventory management.

You’ll become part of our community of transportation professionals with fellow students from several top transportation companies, including:

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Apr
11

Freight Policy Transportation Institute | Washington State University


WELCOME

The FPTI is funded by the United States Department of Transportation (USDOT). Dr. Eric Jessup of Washington State University is Director of the Institute. A Technical Advisory Committee (TAC) comprised of Federal, State and local representatives has been assembled in order to identify relevant and pressing issues for analysis, apply rigorous theoretical and analytical techniques and evaluate results and reports. The following are key goals and objectives for the Freight Policy Transportation Institute:

  • Improve understanding of the importance of efficient and effective freight transportation to both the regional and national economy
  • Address the need for improved intermodal freight transportation, as well as policies and actions that can be implemented to lower operating costs, increase safety and lower environmental impacts of freight transportation nationwide
  • Improve freight transportation performance to specific industries and sectors of the economy

NEWSLETTER

  1. Winter 2016
  2. Spring 2017

WORKSHOP FLYER

Prioritizing Transportation Infrastructure Investments: Broiler Export Supply-Chain Workshop


PRESENTATIONS

  1. The Practical Corridor Supply Chain: Multimodal Case Study Assessment presented at the Transportation Research Board Annual Meeting, Washington DC January 9th, 2017
  2. Poster presented by Jeremy L. Sage, Austin Miller, and J. Bradley Eustice at the 2016 PacTrans Conference in Seattle. Oct., 14
  3. Investing in Connectivity: A Geographic Argument for the Importance of Agricultural Freight Flows given by Eric Jessup at the WEAI meeting in Portland, OR. July, 29
  4. Conservation Procurement Auctions presented by Paksing Choi at the WEAI meeting in Portland, OR. July, 29 PDF Slides
  5. You Zhou and Jeremy Sage: “Know Your Neighbor: Spatial Effects of State Export Promotion and Infrastructure Investment.” Presented at 14th World Conference on Transport Research in Shanghai, China, July 10-15, 2016.
  6. Eric Jessup: Investing in Connectivity: A Geographic Argument for the Importance of Agricultural Freight Flows June 30
  7. Reroute or Wait It Out: Estimating Optimal Route Decisions in the Presence of Unexpected Delays May 2016

More…


PUBLICATIONS & PAPERS

  1. Paper:
  2. Benefits of Transportation Investments: How You Measure Matters
  3. Theme Overview: Agricultural Grain Transportation: Are We Underinvesting and Why?

More…


PROJECTS & REPORTS

  1. Report – Sage, Jeremy, Ken Casavant, and You Zhou. “U.S. 95 Freight Multi-Modal Corridor Supply Chain: A Pilot Study.” Report submitted to Idaho Transportation Department. 2015

More…


FREIGHT DATA

  1. More…

PEOPLE

Freight Policy Transportation Institute:
Director and Associate Research Professor Eric Jessup,
Associate Professor Jia Yan.


Transportation Research Group:
WSU PhD student J. Bradley Eustice,
WSU PhD student Dindu Lama,
WSU Phd student Timur Dincer,

WSU Phd student Mohammad Rahman and,
Research Associate Suzette Galinato and,

WSU Undergraduate student Andrew Gutierrez

WSU Undergraduate student Natasha Garrison


JOB OPPORTUNITIES

WSDOT Job Search
Alphabetical list of a State DOT’s

 

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Apr
7

KPMG’s Automotive Institute Publication Platform

KPMG’s Automotive Institute Publication Platform

Please choose a platform you would like to visit

Global Automotive Executive Survey 2019

In its 20th consecutive year, KPMG’s Global Automotive Executive Survey allows you to review the responses of almost 1,000 senior executives from the world’s leading automotive companies. In addition, it also presents the opinions of more than 2,000 consumers on topics confronting the automotive industry. Take a closer look at Vehicle2Grid transition – and see trends sooner with KPMG.

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Digital Gravity

Due to the impact of “Digital Gravity”, the automotive industry has taken various measures to tackle the challenges of digital transformation. In order to determine the status quo of digitalization, we have consequently asked more than 500 senior executives in the automotive sector to provide their opinion on topics of leadership, culture, organization, processes and technology. Take a closer look at our digital roadmap and the necessary points for action.

Visit Website

© 2019 KPMG International Cooperative (“KPMG International”), a Swiss entity. Member firms of the KPMG network of independent firms are affiliated with KPMG International. KPMG International provides no client services. No member firm has any authority to obligate or bind KPMG International or any other member firm vis-à-vis third parties, nor does KPMG International have any such authority to obligate or bind any member firm. All rights reserved. Legal & Privacy

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Apr
5

Barnett Bicycle Institute

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Our Coursework:

At BBI we believe that bicycle mechanics is a science, not an art. Our core philosophy revolves around providing a professional-grade technical education that teaches students methodology and measurable, repeatable processes.
 
High quality training is one of the surest ways to increase a mechanic’s consistency and quality of work. Come get trained and discover what makes Barnett Bicycle Institute the leading trade school for bicycle mechanics.

Barnett’s Manual DX:

Our repair manual, Barnett’s Manual DX, is the most comprehensive guide to bicycle repair and maintenance in production anywhere. DX is a tremendous resource at nearly 15,000 digital pages of technical resource material.

For our students, DX is a learning resource and lab guide. Due to DX’s thoroughness, the student does not have to rely on memorization or note-taking to complete a procedure.

Barnett Bicycle Institute Tools:

BBI tools are born out of necessity and reflect the same uncompromising commitment to getting the job done right that we have always been known for. Since opening, BBI has worked to discover and teach the most accurate and measurable means to accomplish a task. When the right tool for the job does not exist, we make it.

Contact:

Please get in touch with us by email or phone for any questions or to request more detailed information. We make every possible effort to reply to emails promptly. For more immediate support, please give us a call during our normal business hours. Monday through Friday, 9:00 AM to 5:00 PM, mountain time.

This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.   719.632.5173   2725 Ore Mill Rd Ste 23, Colorado Springs, CO 80904

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Mar
30

Bicycle Technology | The Franklin Institute

The late 1800s ushered in a huge bicycle boom, and people began to experiment with bicycle shapes and styles to suit the varying needs of the rider. Will this bicycle be used for racing or for recreation? How fast will the rider want to go? How comfortable should the rider be while riding? Is this bicycle safe to ride? These questions and much more led people to develop new technologies that would help evolve the bicycle from the high-wheel models seen in early pictures to some of the high-tech racing machines we have today.

In the last decade of the 19th century, at least one-third of all new patent applications at the U.S Patent Office were bicycle related. People focused the changes and improvements they made on what they thought bicycle riders wanted or required. Despite a varying degree of styles and models, four major focuses stood out from the rest: speed, safety, comfort, and endurance. When considering speed, people thought about how fast they wanted to ride their bicycles: is this bike for serious racing, or will it only be used for leisurely riding? Safety and comfort came under scrutiny, and soon after brakes, spokes, and cushion seats were incorporated into the anatomy of the bicycle. Later, the use of handbrakes, adjustment of handlebars, and development of special male and female seats added to safety and comfort features. When endurance or durability mattered and long races or distances were involved, the materials used to build the bicycle were retested or it was rebuilt with lighter material to better withstand wear and tear.

Many materials were experimented with so a bicycle would have just the right feel to it. Wood was used in most early models, but then people began fashioning bikes out of metal. When racing and traveling faster became more important, manufacturers began using aluminum piping for the frames, which was much lighter. Even though automobiles didn’t catch on until the 20th century, people kept experimenting with how to make bicycles better, faster, and more powerful. The very first automobile was a tricycle that put a steam engine to use.

These pictures show a front and a back view of the very first automobile and people enjoying a ride on it. The vehicle was a tricycle equipped with a Lucius D. Copeland steam engine of 2600 R.P.M. and Silsby Type Boiler operating at 100 lbs. It used kerosene for fuel, and was built in Camden, New Jersey in 1887 by the Northrop Manufacturing Co.

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