July 29, 2021
11 11 11 AM
These Cars Are Out of Production and Discontinued for 2022
Bouchard Transportation’s Tugs and Barges Auctioned Off
Car chip shortage to abate, smartphones could be next: industry execs
New York Jets assistant coach dies following bicycle accident
Lightyear One Electric Sedan To Be Produced By Valmet Automotive
1 killed in collision between train, vehicle in Douglas County
Washington transportation crew clears Seattle homeless encampment after arrests connected to rock-throwing
Texas dashcam shows illegal immigrants pour out of smuggler’s car after pursuit
30% tax credit for electric bikes makes progress in US Senate
Automotive Hall of Fame to induct Jay Leno, industry leaders
Latest Post
These Cars Are Out of Production and Discontinued for 2022 Bouchard Transportation’s Tugs and Barges Auctioned Off Car chip shortage to abate, smartphones could be next: industry execs New York Jets assistant coach dies following bicycle accident Lightyear One Electric Sedan To Be Produced By Valmet Automotive 1 killed in collision between train, vehicle in Douglas County Washington transportation crew clears Seattle homeless encampment after arrests connected to rock-throwing Texas dashcam shows illegal immigrants pour out of smuggler’s car after pursuit 30% tax credit for electric bikes makes progress in US Senate Automotive Hall of Fame to induct Jay Leno, industry leaders
Jun
2021
17

CDC Updates COVID-19 Guidance for Mask Wearing on Outdoor Transit Hubs, Public Transportation

Fully vaccinated Americans can now ditch their masks in outdoor transit hubs and on outdoor public transportation, the Centers for Disease Control said in updated guidance issued Thursday.

The new recommendations apply to any outdoor transportation areas, like outside an airport or a bus stop, as well as outdoor areas of public transportation, like the deck of a ferry or an open-air trolley.

Unvaccinated travelers should still continue to wear their masks in all public transportation-related areas, indoors and outdoors, the agency noted.

“CDC will continue to evaluate the requirements of its Order and determine whether additional changes may be warranted,” the agency wrote. “While those who are fully vaccinated may resume many activities without wearing a mask, the travel environment presents a unique set of circumstances based on the number and close interaction of travelers (both vaccinated and unvaccinated).”

Ferry

ANGELA WEISS/AFP via Getty Images

The updated guidance comes weeks after the CDC said fully vaccinated people don’t have to wear their masks outdoors and in many indoor situations. Masks are still required on planes and inside airports, regardless of a person’s vaccination status – a rule that has been extended until at least September.

The CDC has said fully vaccinated people can travel at low risk to themselves and don’t need to quarantine upon returning from an international or domestic trip, and has loosened cruise restrictions for vaccinated travelers (like allowing them to explore ports on their own rather than book a shore excursion through the cruise line).

When it comes to vaccine progress, 64% of Americans 18 and older have received at least one dose of a vaccine, and 53.4% are considered fully vaccinated, according to the CDC.

So far, ABC News reported 13 states have vaccinated at least 70% of their adult populations with at least one dose: Pennsylvania, Vermont, Hawaii, New Hampshire, Massachusetts, Connecticut, Maine, New Jersey, Rhode Island, New Mexico, Washington, Maryland, and California.

Alison Fox is a contributing writer for Travel + Leisure. When she’s not in New York City, she likes to spend her time at the beach or exploring new destinations and hopes to visit every country in the world. Follow her adventures on Instagram.

Jun
2021
13

Local automotive shop offers guidance on improving car AC’s performance

WICHITA, Kan. (KWCH) – With hotter temperatures in the forecast, now is the time to make sure the air conditioning in your vehicle is working properly. The heat can make about any vehicle feel like a sauna and without working air conditioning and the misery could lead to a health concern if you’re unable to find relief.

Christian Brothers Automotive owner Jesse Schemm said most of the time, your car’s AC simply works as it should or it doesn’t work at all. If you notice that it takes longer for the air to cool or it gets warmer when you’re stopped, you might want to get it checked. Schemm said you should also make sure that your cabin air filter is clean. That could improve the air conditioner’s performance.

”It filters that air we’re circulating from outside the vehicle, traps pollen, debris, leaves. We’ve seen critters make their homes there, all that fun stuff,” Schemm said. “So, that’s certainly a maintenance item customers want to keep up to make sure AC performance is operating as designed. That puts less pressure on the blower motor and makes the system last longer.”

He also advised making sure you’re using your vehicle’s AC recirculation in the summer months. That way, it pulls the cool air inside of your car instead of pulling hot air from outside and trying to cool it off.

Copyright 2021 KWCH. All rights reserved.

Mar
2020
30

Bicycle Requirements Business Guidance | CPSC.gov

What is the purpose of the requirements for bicycles?

This regulation increases the safety of bicycles by establishing, among other things, requirements for assembly, braking, protrusions, structural integrity and reflectors. Bicycles that fail any of the requirements are banned under the Federal Hazardous Substances Act.

 

Where can I find the requirements for bicycles?

The requirements are in the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) in Title 16, Part 1512.

 

What is a bicycle?

A bicycle is defined in §1512.2 as either (1) a two-wheeled vehicle having a rear drive wheel solely human-powered; or (2) a two- or three-wheeled vehicle with fully operable pedals and an electric motor of less than 750 watts (1 h.p.), whose maximum speed on a paved level surface, when powered solely by such a motor while ridden by an operator who weighs 170 pounds, is less than 20 mph.

 

The bicycle requirements cover two different types of bicycles. Those with a seat that is more than 25 inches above the ground when the seat is adjusted to its highest position must meet all of the requirements.  Sidewalk bicycles – those with a seat height of 25 inches or less – are exempt from some of the requirements or have other alternative requirements.  These exemptions and alternatives are marked in bold type in this summary. Please consult §1512.2 of the requirements for more information on how to measure seat height.

 

Are any bicycles exempt from the requirements?

Yes.  Track bicycles designed and intended for use in competition that have tubular tires, a single crank–towheel ratio, and no freewheeling feature are exempt. So are one-of-a-kind bicycles made to the order of an individual without assembling stock or production parts.

 

How are bicycles tested in general?

Assembled bicycles must meet the requirements of the regulation in the condition in which they are offered for sale.  Unassembled or partially assembled bicycles must meet the requirements after assembly according to the manufacturer’s instructions.

Illustration of a bicycle and its parts

Figure 1 – Illustration of a bicycle and its parts

 

 

Are there any general requirements that bicycles must meet?

Yes.

 

 

(1) Adults of normal intelligence and ability must be able to assemble a bicycle that requires assembly.

 

 

(2) A bicycle may not have unfinished sheared metal edges or other sharp parts that may cut a rider’s hands or legs.  Sheared metal edges must be rolled or finished to remove burrs or feathering.

 

 

(3) When the bicycle is tested for braking (§1512.18(d) and/or (e)) or road  performance (§1512.18(p) or (q)), neither the frame, nor any steering part, wheel, pedal, crank, or braking system part may show a visible break.

 

 

(4) Screws, bolts, and nuts used to fasten parts may not loosen, break, or fail during testing.

 

 

(5) Control cables must be routed so that they do not fray from contact with fixed parts of a bicycle or with the ends of the cable sheaths.  The ends of control cables must be capped or treated so that they do not unravel.

 

 

(6) A bicycle may not have any protrusions within the

Mar
2020
30

Intelligent Transportation Systems – Vehicle to Infrastructure (V2I) Deployment Guidance and Resources

Vehicle-to-Infrastructure (V2I) Resources

Vehicle-to-Infrastructure (V2I) is the next generation of Intelligent Transportation Systems (ITS). V2I technologies capture vehicle-generated traffic data, wirelessly providing information such as advisories from the infrastructure to the vehicle that inform the driver of safety, mobility, or environment-related conditions. State and local agencies are likely to install V2I infrastructure alongside or integrated with existing ITS equipment. Because of this, the majority of V2I deployments may qualify for similar federal-aid programs as ITS deployments, if the deploying agency meets certain eligibility requirements.

This page lists a broad range of resources that help planners, transportation engineers, decision-makers, and other involved in the ITS deployment process with valuable information about V2I technologies.

For Transportation Planners

Vehicle-To-Infrastructure (V2i) Message Lexicon – To help with Vehicle-to-Infrastructure (V2I) deployments, a V2I Message Lexicon was developed that explains the relationships and concepts for V2I messages and identifies the ITS standards where they may be found. This lexicon document provides a brief history and background for connected vehicle (CV) and infrastructure-focused standards that relate to CV V2I applications, and explain the construction of V2I messages using current communications standards. Additional information is provided to help understand concepts and activities that are related to V2I messages and briefly review recent and forthcoming standards that support CV applications.

The FHWA Fact Sheet, Environmental Justice Consideration for Connected and Automated Vehicles provides information on the benefits and challenges associated with the deployment of connected and automated vehicles and considerations to help address potential negative impacts on EJ populations. The Fact Sheet describes differences between connected vehicles and automated vehicles, highlights deployment scenarios and implications for environmental justice populations, and provides Federal resources to address the issue.

Connected Vehicle Impacts on Transportation Planning Primer – This report summarizes the results of the findings and recommendations of the study and provides planners with a primer on how to begin to address the impacts of connected and automated vehicle technology in their work. The first section includes a summary description of the technologies and potential impacts. The following section includes a summary of potential impacts on planning goals, objectives, products, tools, and data. Impacts are identified as short-term (0 to 5 years), medium-term (5 to 20 years), or long-term (over 20 years). Impacts are then further examined in a series of case studies designed to help planners incorporate these technologies into their planning products.

Connected Vehicle Impacts on Transportation Planning Desk Reference – This report provides planners with a primer on how to begin to address the impacts of connected and automated vehicle technology in their work. The first section includes a summary description of the technologies and potential impacts. The following section includes a summary of potential impacts on planning goals, objectives, products, tools, and data. Impacts are identified as short-term (0 to 5 years), medium-term (5 to 20 years), or long-term (over 20 years). Impacts are then further examined in a series of case studies designed to help planners incorporate these technologies into their planning products.

Technical Memorandum #2: