July 29, 2021
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These Cars Are Out of Production and Discontinued for 2022
Bouchard Transportation’s Tugs and Barges Auctioned Off
Car chip shortage to abate, smartphones could be next: industry execs
New York Jets assistant coach dies following bicycle accident
Lightyear One Electric Sedan To Be Produced By Valmet Automotive
1 killed in collision between train, vehicle in Douglas County
Washington transportation crew clears Seattle homeless encampment after arrests connected to rock-throwing
Texas dashcam shows illegal immigrants pour out of smuggler’s car after pursuit
30% tax credit for electric bikes makes progress in US Senate
Automotive Hall of Fame to induct Jay Leno, industry leaders
Latest Post
These Cars Are Out of Production and Discontinued for 2022 Bouchard Transportation’s Tugs and Barges Auctioned Off Car chip shortage to abate, smartphones could be next: industry execs New York Jets assistant coach dies following bicycle accident Lightyear One Electric Sedan To Be Produced By Valmet Automotive 1 killed in collision between train, vehicle in Douglas County Washington transportation crew clears Seattle homeless encampment after arrests connected to rock-throwing Texas dashcam shows illegal immigrants pour out of smuggler’s car after pursuit 30% tax credit for electric bikes makes progress in US Senate Automotive Hall of Fame to induct Jay Leno, industry leaders
Jun
2021
30

And the Prize for “Best Automotive Interior” Goes to Bentley’s Flying Spur

Bentleys are not your ordinary cars that just get you around from point A to point B. They are a tribute to elegance and luxury, so it is no wonder that the Flying Spur won the “Best Automotive Interior” award.

Robb Report is an American luxury/lifestyle magazine that features the world’s most exquisite products, whether we’re talking about cars, jewelry, watches, yachts, real estate, and so on. The magazine recently published its “Best of the Best Awards 2021”, a list with the finest products and experiences of the last 12 months, anywhere in the world.

The award for the “Best automotive interior” went to the Bentley Flying Spur, proving extraordinary attention to detail and exceptional craftsmanship on the British manufacturer’s part.

The Flying Spur was introduced by Bentley in 2005, as one of the most luxury sports sedans in the world. The car blends state-of-the-art technology and innovation with elegant and sophisticated design.

According to Christophe Georges, president, and CEO of Bentley Americas, the Flying Spur raised the bar of limousine luxury and timeless design. The magazine also describes the cabin of the Bentley sedan as being so baronial that it makes it difficult for you to know whether you’re in a car or a tony members’ club.

The cabin of the Flying Spur features striking veneer, with 11 choices at hand, including open-pore Koa or Dark Burr Walnut, with or without an optional chrome pinstripe. The three-dimensional textured leather upholstery is also available in 15 colors and there’s lofted diamond quilting on the seats.

The Flying Spur features a floating center console with a 12.3-inch high-definition touchscreen. The rear passengers can access the controls with the help of the Touch Screen Remote. The controls allow you to perfectly adjust every parameter to your taste, for a perfect journey, from navigation, ventilation, infotainment, sunroof, and more.

Jun
2021
21

Flying Car Makers Want to Build ‘Uber Meets Tesla in the Air’

It was sleek, cone-shaped, a little confusing — like something Hollywood would give a sci-fi villain for a quick getaway.

It wasn’t a helicopter. And it wasn’t an airplane. It was a cross between the two, with a curved hull, two small wings, and eight spinning rotors lined up across its nose and tail.

At the touch of a button on a computer screen under a nearby tent, it stirred to life, rising up from a grassy slope on a ranch in central California and speeding toward some cattle grazing under a tree — who did not react in the slightest.

“It may look like a strange beast, but it will change the way transportation happens,” said Marcus Leng, the Canadian inventor who designed this aircraft, which he named BlackFly.

BlackFly is what is often called a flying car. Engineers and entrepreneurs like Mr. Leng have spent more than a decade nurturing this new breed of aircraft, electric vehicles that can take off and land without a runway.

They believe these vehicles will be cheaper and safer than helicopters, providing practically anyone with the means of speeding above crowded streets.

“Our dream is to free the world from traffic,” said Sebastian Thrun, another engineer at the heart of this movement.

That dream, most experts agree, is a long way from reality. But the idea is gathering steam. Dozens of companies are now building these aircraft, and three recently agreed to go public in deals that value them as high as $6 billion. For years, people like Mr. Leng and Mr. Thrun have kept their prototypes hidden from the rest of the world — few people have seen them, much less flown in them — but they are now beginning to lift the curtain.

Mr. Leng’s company, Opener, is building a single-person aircraft for use in rural areas — essentially a private flying car for the rich — that could start selling this year. Others are building larger vehicles they hope to deploy as city air taxis as soon as 2024 — an Uber for the skies. Some are designing vehicles that can fly without a pilot.

One of the air taxi companies, Kitty Hawk, is run by Mr. Thrun, the Stanford University computer science professor who founded Google’s self-driving car project. He now says that autonomy will be far more powerful in the air than on the ground, and that it will enter our daily lives much sooner. “You can fly in a straight line and you don’t have the massive weight or the stop-and-go of a car” on the ground, he said.

The rise of the flying car mirrors that of self-driving vehicles in ways both good and bad, from the enormous ambition to the multi-billion-dollar investments to the cutthroat corporate competition, including a high-profile lawsuit alleging intellectual property theft. It also recreates the enormous hype.

It is a risky comparison. Google and other self-driving companies did not deliver on the grand promise that robo-taxis would be zipping around

Jun
2021
18

The Navy Concluded Transmedium Flying Submersibles Were Possible A Decade Ago

A U.S. Navy research document from 2010 outlines the Naval Surface Warfare Center (NSWC) Carderock Division‘s efforts to create a working design of a manned vehicle capable of both airborne flight and submerged travel. The craft was intended to provide stealthy transport for Special Forces units into and out of operating areas. This wasn’t the first study of its kind to propose such a “transmedium” vehicle, defined as one capable of operating in multiple domains, such as in the air and underwater, but building such a craft has proven itself time and time again to be difficult, to say the least. It’s not clear how far the Navy’s efforts went, but the document’s conclusions are significant in that they show that over a decade ago, Naval researchers concluded that a “working design is feasible within the current state of the art.”

Aircraft that could also operate under the sea have long been pursued by the U.S. Navy and other militaries. A number of often unworkable or heavily compromised designs have been proposed and even tested by armed forces around the world since at least the 1950s, including various forms of submersible aircraft, to more modern designs like the short-lived Lockheed Martin Cormorant. While the degree to which these designs have been able to operate in both the sea and air environments vary greatly, among the “holy grails” of aerospace research is a truly hybrid vehicle, a submersible aircraft or “flying submarine” that can travel near-seamlessly between the sky and the sea. 

USN




In 2010, NSWC Carderock published its study of just such a vehicle concept. The idea was to research the feasibility of designing a vehicle that combined “the speed and range of an airborne platform with the stealth of an underwater vehicle by developing a vessel that can both fly and submerge.” The ultimate goal was to work towards developing a vehicle that could insert and extract Special Forces units at much greater ranges and speeds than existing platforms at the time, and be able to do so in locations that were “not previously accessible without direct support from additional military assets.” There have been far less ambitious boat-submarine concepts brought to life as of late, that try to address the issues of getting around the inherent limitations of existing swimmer delivery options. But the technological chasm between creating a vehicle that can transition between the surface and subsurface of the ocean and creating a true flying submarine is absolutely massive. 

The study was born out of a Broad Area Announcement (BAA) issued by DARPA in 2008 calling for design proposals for such a Special Forces vehicle and defining a Concept of Operations (CONOP) for potential designs. NSWC Carderock based its study off of that CONOP, which outlined the need for a vehicle whose capabilities included:

– Deployment from a naval/auxiliary platform;
– take-off from the water surface and transit 400 miles airborne, then land on the water surface;
– submerge and transit 12 [nautical

Mar
2020
30

Flying with Children

Child safety


Did you know that the safest place for your child on an airplane is in a government-approved child safety restraint system (CRS) or device, not on your lap? Your arms aren’t capable of holding your child securely, especially during unexpected turbulence.


The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) strongly urges you to secure your child in a CRS or device for the duration of your flight. It’s the smart and right thing to do so that everyone in your family arrives safely at your destination. The FAA is giving you the information you need to make informed decisions about your family’s travel plans.




About Child Restraint Systems (CRS)


mother and child in the cabinA CRS is a hard-backed child safety seat that is approved by the government for use in both motor vehicles and aircraft. FAA controls the approval of some but not all CRSs. Additional information is available in FAA guidance (PDF) and on the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration website. Not all car seats are approved for use in airplanes.


Make sure your CRS is government approved and has “This restraint is certified for use in motor vehicles and aircraft” printed on it. Otherwise, you may be asked to check the CRS as baggage.


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Installing a CRS on an Airplane









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A CRS must be installed in a forward-facing aircraft seat, in accordance with manufacturer’s instructions. This includes placing the CRS in the appropriate forward- or aft-facing direction as indicated on the label for the size of the child.


Booster seats and harness vests enhance safety in vehicles. However, the FAA prohibits passengers from using these types of restraints and belly belts during ground movement, take-off and landing because they do not provide the best protection. The FAA encourages parents to make the best safety choice by using an approved CRS during all phases of flight. While there is no regulatory prohibition from using a booster seat or harness vest (or other non-approved devices) for a lap child during the cruise portion of the flight only, airlines have policies which may or may not allow the use of those devices. Check with your airline.


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FAA-Approved Child Harness Device (CARES)


young boy in child harness restraintThe CARES Child Safety Device is the only FAA-approved harness-type restraint for children weighing between 22 and 44 pounds. This type of device provides an alternative to using a hard-backed seat and is approved only for use on aircraft. The CARES Child Safety Device is not approved for use in motor vehicles. Learn more about CARES.


If you’re using a CARES child safety device, make sure it has “FAA Approved in Accordance with 14 CFR 21.8(d), Approved for Aircraft Use Only” or “FAA Approved in Accordance