Tag Archives

Archive of posts published in the category: Expensive
May
12

The World’s 10 Most Expensive Bikes: Cycling With Style

What is the most expensive bike in the world? The winner is still Trek Butterfly Madone, checking in at half a million dollars. No less than Lance Armstrong used it in the 2009 Tour de France. Would you buy one? Or maybe you can settle for the “cheaper” bikes on our updated 2020 list of the most expensive bikes in the world:

  1. Trek Butterfly Madone: $500,000
  2. Trek Yoshimoto Nara: $200,000
  3. Kaws: Trek Madone: $160,000
  4. Auramania Crystal Edition Gold Bike: $114,000
  5. Trek Madone 7: Diamond: $75,000
  6. Chrome Hearts X Cervelo Mountain Bike: $60,000
  7. Montante Luxury Gold Collection: $46,000
  8. eRockit’s Electric Assist Bicycle: $44,000
  9. Litespeed Blade: $40,788
  10. Phanuel Krencker’s ‘Bicyclettes de Luxe’: $34,425

Cycling is great for the environment as a bicycle does not emit any noxious fumes and biking is also wonderful for health. There are many reasons why you should take up cycling according to Bikeradar.com. The health benefits of cycling include:

  • Prevention or management of disease
  • Reduced body fat levels
  • Strengthened bones
  • Improved coordination and posture
  • Decreased stress levels
  • Enhanced joint mobility
  • Increased flexibility and muscle strength
  • Improved cardiovascular fitness

… and more.

Cycling also helps you to look younger, improve your brain power, beat illness, live longer, and save the planet. Plus, you can ward off cancer, lose weight, reduce pollution, enjoy family time, boost your sporting performance, improve your lung capacity, and develop a positive addiction. For these and other reasons, cycling has become popular all over the world. Statista.com reports that the global bicycle market value is expected to zoom up to $62 billion in 2024, from $45.08 billion in 2016.

In this article, we provide a list of the most expensive bikes ever made. These bikes are costly because they are adorned with precious materials and were made for a special occasion. They fetched high prices at auctions which is why they find a place in this list of most expensive bikes. Now, let’s get down to action and elaborate the list:

#10 Phanuel Krencker’s ‘Bicyclettes de Luxe’: $34,425

Besides carbon fiber and chrome, the bike includes custom parts and a frame made by Cyfac. The cycle has a shiny, reflective appearance thanks to chrome paint and mirror-polished parts. Tr!ckstuff supplied the rear and front disc brakes, making this attractive bike an amalgamation of creative design and outstanding parts.

#9 Litespeed Blade: $40,788

This innovative bike offers unmatched stoutness and quality. It provides an amazing cycling experience with its well-shaped head tubes that reduce aero drag and enhance performance, massive tube, and knife-edged backbone. This bike is the result of collaboration between Litespeed and Merlin in the late 1980’s. Renowned European bike brands such as Eddy Merckx have marketed this bicycle.

#8 eRockit’s Electric Assist Bicycle: $44,000

Another highlight is this bike’s battery that can last up to l0 years or 50,000 kilometers. This modern bicycle is ideal for wealthy bikers who do not wish to pedal all the time. Though most e-bikes retail for between $1,000 and $5,000, this one commands a hefty price

Apr
5

Are Expensive Bicycle Wheels Worth the Money? Let’s Check the Physics

In this video, you see a cyclist testing new aerodynamic wheels from Zipp. Swapping your wheels may seem like a small change, but can make a big difference. From his tests, the rider discovers:

  • With conventional wheels, he can ride 20 minutes at an average speed of 41.12 kph with an average power of 379 watts.
  • With the Zipp 808 NSW aero wheels he rides 51 minutes at an average speed of 41.13 kph and average power of 344 watts.

Before looking at power and energy, I should go over two small details.

First, how do you measure power? Cyclists can measure power by installing a small computer, called a power meter, that measures the input torque at the pedals or crankshaft and records the rotation angle at timed intervals. If you know the torque and angle, you can calculate the input energy. Dividing this energy by time gives you power.

La te xi t 1

Second, this isn’t a perfect test of aerodynamics. If you really want to examine the effect of the new wheels, you probably would have to put a bike with a dummy in a wind tunnel. When the reviewer takes his second ride, many things could have changed—wind, body position, amount of sweat on the body—and impacted performance. Let’s assume the only thing that changed was the wheels.

Air Drag and Power

What happens when you ride a bike? If you are moving at a constant speed, then the net force on the bike-human system must be zero. In a slightly simplified view, I can draw the following force diagram:

Spring 2016 Sketches key

The vertical forces (gravity pulling down and the ground pushing up) don’t really matter here. Just forget about them and pay attention to the horizontal forces. First, let’s look at the air drag. Air acts in complicated ways when an object passes through it. But who cares when we can make a simple model of air drag force? Here’s an expression for the magnitude of this force:

La te xi t 1

In this model, the air force is proportional to the square of the bike’s speed (v). For the other terms, we have:

  • ρ is the density of air (around 1.0 kg/m3).
  • A is the cross sectional area of the bike plus the rider (how much of the object interacts with the air).
  • Finally, C is the drag coefficient. This parameter depends upon the shape of the object. If you change the wheels, it is the value of C that should change.

The second horizontal force is the frictional force. An interaction between the road and the tires propels the bike. I know what you’re thinking: Doesn’t the human propel the bike? In a sense, yes. But the reality is sort of complicated. The rider’s power goes through the pedals and chain to the wheel, which turns. But the force comes from the tire pushing against the road. So for our energy perspective on this problem let’s just say the human provides the friction force.

Clearly the faster the biker