July 31, 2021
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How to Get a Bear Out of Your Car – Videos from The Weather Channel
Towing company agrees to pay troops for illegally selling their vehicles
Sangamon County Board to vote on first phase of transportation center
This Is the Deadliest Car in the U.S., According to Data
Charleston’s Ashley River bicycle-pedestrian bridge project making strides | News
HAAH Automotive Goes Bust, Abandons Plans To Import Chinese Cars To America
These Cars Are Out of Production and Discontinued for 2022
Bouchard Transportation’s Tugs and Barges Auctioned Off
Car chip shortage to abate, smartphones could be next: industry execs
New York Jets assistant coach dies following bicycle accident
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How to Get a Bear Out of Your Car – Videos from The Weather Channel Towing company agrees to pay troops for illegally selling their vehicles Sangamon County Board to vote on first phase of transportation center This Is the Deadliest Car in the U.S., According to Data Charleston’s Ashley River bicycle-pedestrian bridge project making strides | News HAAH Automotive Goes Bust, Abandons Plans To Import Chinese Cars To America These Cars Are Out of Production and Discontinued for 2022 Bouchard Transportation’s Tugs and Barges Auctioned Off Car chip shortage to abate, smartphones could be next: industry execs New York Jets assistant coach dies following bicycle accident
Jul
2021
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Roll on: Curbside Bicycles brings tune-ups to a curb near you | Local News

“That way, my marketing is completely targeted. It’s coming from a trusted source: a neighbor, rather than myself, who’s a random person. And it’s 100% free,” Oestreich said. “I don’t know of any other marketing technique that checks those boxes.”

Oestreich doesn’t set hours for the pop-up, but usually stops taking customers when he hits 15 bikes and calls it quits when the last bike is done. Each tune-up costs $75. Replacing things like inner tubes and chains costs extra. More than that and it’s a job for someone else.

“If your bike is falling apart and it needs all sorts of replacements, I don’t do that,” Oestreich said. He specializes in speedy, nearby service for everyone from the occasional weekend rider to daily bike commuters. 

It’s the perfect business model for the pandemic, he said. The business is entirely outside, with little customer contact required. And by traveling to residential neighborhoods, he meets customers where they are — which at the peak of the pandemic was mostly at home. 

New year, new neighborhoods

By the time Orangetheory offered Oestreich his job back, he turned them down.

Curbside Bicycles “fully supports me,” he said. “I feel super fortunate. The fact that the pandemic was a boon to me is kind of an amazing phenomenon.”