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Archive of posts published in the category: transportation
May
20

Mode of transport – Wikipedia

The How and Why Library 019.jpg

Mode of transport is a term used to distinguish between different ways of transportation or transporting people or goods. The different modes of transport are air, water, and land transport, which includes Rails or railways, road and off-road transport. Other modes also exist, including pipelines, cable transport, and space transport. Human-powered transport and animal-powered transport are sometimes regarded as their own mode, but never fall into the other categories. In general, transportation is used for moving of people, animals, and other goods from one place to another. The means of transport, on the other hand, refers to the (motorized) vehicles necessary for transport according to the chosen mode (car, airplane, ship, truck and rail). Each mode of transport has a fundamentally different technological solution, and some require a separate environment. Each mode has its own infrastructure, vehicles, and operations.

Animal-powered[edit]

Animal-powered transport is the use of working animals for the transport of people and/or goods. Humans may use some of the animals directly, use them as pack animals for carrying goods, or harness them, alone or in teams, to pull sleds or wheeled vehicles.

A fixed-wing aircraft, typically airplane, is a heavier-than-air flying vehicle, in which the special geometry of the wings generates lift and then lifts the whole vehicle. Fixed-wing aircraft range from small trainers and recreational aircraft to large airliners and military cargo aircraft. For short distances or in places without runways, helicopters can be operable.[1] (Other types of aircraft, like autogyros and airships, are not a significant portion of air transport.)

Air transport is the fastest method of transport, Commercial jets reach speeds of up to 955 kilometres per hour (593 mph) and a considerably higher ground speed if there is a jet stream tailwind, while piston-powered general aviation aircraft may reach up to 555 kilometres per hour (345 mph) or more. This celerity comes with higher cost and energy use,[2] and aviation’s impacts to the environment and particularly the global climate require consideration when comparing modes of transportation.[3] The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) estimates a commercial jet’s flight to have some 2-4 times the effect on the climate than if the same CO2 emissions were made at ground level, because of different atmospheric chemistry and radiative forcing effects at the higher altitude.[4] U.S. airlines alone burned about 16.2 billion gallons of fuel during the twelve months between October 2013 and September 2014.[5] WHO estimates that globally as many as 500,000 people at a time are on planes.[2] The global trend has been for increasing numbers of people to travel by air, and individually to do so with increasing frequency and over longer distances, a dilemma that has the attention of climate scientists and other researchers,[6][7][8] the press,[9][10] and the World Wide Web.[11] The issue of impacts from frequent travel, particularly by air because of the long distances that are easily covered in one or a few days, is

May
19

Your Complete Guide to Los Angeles Transportation Options

As one of the most-visited destinations in the world, Los Angeles boasts numerous transportation options. Thanks to an abundance of airports, freeways and other options, planning your Los Angeles transportation isn’t difficult, although getting to and around Los Angeles without traffic might be! Hop aboard, as we explore the transportation options for Los Angeles and the surrounding areas.

Transportation To Los Angeles

Whether you drive or fly depends largely, of course, on where you’re coming from and how many passengers you will have with you in your frog squad. Larger families with a lot of tadpoles may find it’s more economical to drive, but you should always factor in the additional cost of gas and food while on the road. And leapin’ lily pads, you should know that California has some of the highest gas prices in the country. Once you get over the shock at the pump, the Los Angeles area does have a massive freeway system. That makes Los Angeles fairly easy to get to and more car-based than other cities, so bringing your own car can help you save on flights and a rental car.

Los Angeles Area Airports

Your Complete Guide to Los Angeles Transportation Options - LAX at Night Courtesy of the Los Angeles Tourism & Convention Board

If you’re flying to LA, you have an abundance of options. The two biggest airports are Los Angeles International Airport (LAX) or John Wayne Airport (SNA), although depending on your origin, you may find the smaller airports to have more competitive rates or to be more convenient from your departing airport. At 12 miles away, John Wayne is just a hop, skip and jump away from Disneyland, although Long Beach is only a bit longer jump at 18 miles away. Burbank is closer to downtown Los Angeles and Hollywood than LAX.

Los Angeles International Airport (LAX)

Your Complete Guide to Los Angeles Transportation Options - LAX Courtesy of the Los Angeles Tourism & Convention Board

John Wayne Airport (SNA)

Long Beach Airport (LGB)

LA/Ontario International Airport (ONT)

Your Complete Guide to Los Angeles Transportation Options - Ontario Airport

Hollywood Burbank Airport (BUR)

Traveling Between Los Angeles and San Diego

Your Complete Guide to Los Angeles Transportation Options - Union Station Courtesy of the Los Angeles Tourism & Convention Board

For travelers planning to visit both Los Angeles and San Diego (about 120 miles away), it is usually much cheaper and easier to rent a car or hop on a train rather than fly between the two cities. All aboard! Amtrak operates from the historic Union Station in Downtown Los Angeles, and makes stops in several Orange County cities (including Anaheim) before making it to San Diego’s Santa Fe Depot (also historic), a journey of about three hours. If you’ll be hopping in a car, it can take two to four hours to travel between the two cities, depending on traffic.

Transportation Around Los Angeles

Your Complete Guide to Los Angeles Transportation Options - Big Thunder Mountain Railroad

Los Angeles is a very large city that covers about 469 square miles, so the most popular way of getting about is by car. Residents of Los Angeles are very attached to their cars and the immense freeway system for traveling around Los Angeles and neighboring Orange County. If you’re taking a trip to Los Angeles, you

May
16

Transportation in Los Angeles – Wikipedia

complex multimodal regional, national and international hub for passenger and freight traffic

Los Angeles has a complex multimodal transportation infrastructure, which serves as a regional, national and international hub for passenger and freight traffic. The system includes the United States’ largest port complex; an extensive freight and passenger rail infrastructure, including light rail lines and subway lines; numerous airports and bus lines; Transportation Network Companies; and an extensive freeway and road system. People in Los Angeles rely on cars as the dominant mode of transportation,[1] but since 1990 Los Angeles Metro Rail has built over one hundred miles (160 km) of light and heavy rail serving more and more parts of Los Angeles.

Intercity[edit]

Air transportation[edit]

LAX, the fourth busiest airport in the world.

In the Los Angeles metropolitan area, there are five commercial airports and many more general-aviation airports.

The primary Los Angeles airport is Los Angeles International Airport (LAX). The seventh busiest commercial airport in the world and the third busiest in the United States, LAX handled 61.9 million passengers, 1.884 million metric tons (2.077 million short tons; 1.854 million long tons) of cargo and 680,954 aircraft movements in 2007.[2]

Other major nearby commercial airports include: LA/Ontario International Airport (serves the Inland Empire); Bob Hope Airport (formerly known as Burbank Airport; serves the San Fernando and San Gabriel Valleys); Long Beach Airport (serves the Long Beach/Harbor area); and John Wayne Airport (serves the Orange County area).

The world’s busiest general-aviation airport is also located in Los Angeles, Van Nuys Airport. Santa Monica Airport is also located near Los Angeles.

Intercity train services[edit]

Major freight rail lines in southern Los Angeles County, including the Alameda Corridor highlighted in pink

Union Station is the major regional train station for Amtrak, Metrolink and Metro Rail. The station is Amtrak’s fifth busiest station, having 1,464,289 Amtrak boardings and de-boardings in 2006.[3] Amtrak operates eleven daily round trips between San Diego and Los Angeles, five of which continue to Santa Barbara via the Pacific Surfliner, the only service that runs through Los Angeles multiple times daily. Two of those trips continue to San Luis Obispo, California. The Coast Starlight provides additional service on the route and beyond to the San Francisco Bay Area, Sacramento, and on to Seattle, Washington. Amtrak motor coaches connect from Los Angeles to the San Joaquin Route in Bakersfield with frequent service through the Central Valley of California to Sacramento and Oakland, and eastward to San Bernardino and Las Vegas.

There is also daily service to Chicago, Illinois on the Southwest Chief, and three times a week to New Orleans, Louisiana on the Sunset Limited. Due to the effects from Hurricane Katrina, Sunset Limited service between New Orleans to Jacksonville, Florida has been discontinued, although Amtrak is required by current Federal Law to develop a plan to reinstate the service. The Texas Eagle is a second train to Chicago, which operates thrice weekly. Sunset Limited and

May
14

THE BEST Los Angeles Transportation

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* TripAdvisor LLC is not a booking agent and does not charge any service fees to users of our site… (more)

TripAdvisor LLC is not responsible for content on external web sites. Taxes, fees not included for deals content.

May
13

Home – Access Services

Your Safety Is Our Priority. In response to the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic, Access has taken several proactive measures to help safeguard your health while taking Access, including No Share-Rides and Enhanced Vehicle Cleaning.

To ensure the health and safety of our employees and riders, we are asking that you DO NOT schedule a trip using Access if you have been confirmed to have COVID-19, or are going to a facility to be tested for COVID-19.
Riders are encouraged to follow the Los Angeles County Safer at Home Emergency Order. If you must travel, please follow these guidelines:
• Cover your face while riding Access
• Do not use Access if you are sick
• Cover your coughs and sneezes
• Wash hands frequently with soap and warm water, or use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer.

Starting Monday, May 4th, Access will begin offering limited same day service. For further information on this and other COVID-19 programs, please click on the Coronavirus – COVID-19 Updates link in the Rider Alert Section below.

Your Safety Is Our Priority. In response to the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic, Access has taken several proactive measures to help safeguard your health while taking Access, including No Share-Rides and Enhanced Vehicle Cleaning.

To ensure the health and safety of our employees and riders, we are asking that you DO NOT schedule a trip using Access if you have been confirmed to have COVID-19, or are going to a facility to be tested for COVID-19.
Riders are encouraged to follow the Los Angeles County Safer at Home Emergency Order. If you must travel, please follow these guidelines:
• Cover your face while riding Access
• Do not use Access if you are sick
• Cover your coughs and sneezes
• Wash hands frequently with soap and warm water, or use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer.

Starting Monday, May 4th, Access will begin offering limited same day service. For further information on this and other COVID-19 programs, please click on the Coronavirus – COVID-19 Updates link in the Rider Alert Section below.

Welcome to Access Services, the consolidated Transportation Services Agency (CTSA) for Los Angeles County.

Access Services is responsible for the administration of Access, the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) mandated paratransit transportation program for Los Angeles County and is committed to improving the mobility on public transit of persons with disabilities.

Learn More About Riding Access

Source Article

May
12

Los Angeles Public Transit | Discover Los Angeles

The City of Los Angeles Transportation (LADOT) currently operates the second largest fleet in Los Angeles County. LADOT’s transit fleet serves approximately 30 million passenger boardings per year.

DASH Downtown

Six quick bus routes through Downtown depart every five to 15 minutes between 5:50 a.m. and 6 p.m. on weekdays, and every six to 20 minutes between 10 a.m. and 5 p.m. on Saturdays and Sundays.

  •     Route A – Little Tokyo to City West
  •     Route B – Chinatown to Financial District
  •     Route D – Union Station to South Park
  •     Route E – City West to Fashion District
  •     Route F – Financial District to Exposition Park/USC

DASH also Serves:

  •     Beachwood Canyon
  •     Boyle Heights/East LA
  •     Chesterfield Square
  •     Crenshaw
  •     Downtown Los Angeles
  •     El Sereno/City Terrace
  •     Fairfax
  •     Highland Park/Eagle Rock
  •     Hollywood
  •     Hollywood/West Hollywood
  •     Hollywood/Wilshire
  •     King-East
  •     Leimert/Slauson
  •     Lincoln Heights/Chinatown
  •     Los Feliz
  •     Midtown
  •     Northridge
  •     Panorama City/Van Nuys
  •     Pico Union/Echo Park
  •     San Pedro
  •     Southeast Los Angeles
  •     Van Nuys/Studio City
  •     Vermont/Main
  •     Watts
  •     Wilmington
  •     Wilshire Center/Koreatown

Commuter Express

LADOT offers stress-free, reliable bus service to Downtown Los Angeles in the morning and back in the afternoon from communities reaching from the beach cities to the San Fernando Valley.

For more information, visit the DASH website.

Source Article

May
12

Los Angeles Transportation

Metro Local Bus near the Hard Rock Café at Hollywood & Highland Center on Hollywood Boulevard. [Photo Credit: LAtourist.com]Metro Local Bus on Hollywood Boulevard

Bus Services

– Los Angeles has the second largest public transportation agency in the nation that operates more than 1,500 buses. We also have a subway system that can take you from Downtown Los Angeles to Hollywood in about 15 minutes! Los Angeles County Metropolitan Transportation Authority (Metro) operates the public buses and commuter trains within Los Angeles. The metro.net has extensive schedule information, trip planners and much more.

– and other tips about using Metro, such as how to pay fare, getting to some of the famous tourist attractions, identifying buses by their color and more. The Metro Trip Planner is fast and easy to use. You can use it to plan routes in advances, so you don’t waste valuable vacation time. You can also use the Metro Trip Planner to find out if your hotel is near convenient Metro routes BEFORE you make your reservations! If you are going to rely on public transportation while visiting Los Angeles, then it’s very helpful to become familiar with metro.net!