September 17, 2021
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California homeless camp fire damages 2 bridges, disrupts public transportation
Austin finishes half of its bicycle network, expects to complete entire 400-mile system by 2025
The Top 10 Automotive Concepts that automotive enthusiasts will be itching to see on the road!
Oregon Transportation Commission, wary of I-5 Rose Quarter project’s growing price tag, grants conditional approval
Woman dies after being hit by car in North Windham Friday night
Silk-FAW Continues To Poach Italy’s Automotive Talent, As Lamborghini’s Katia Bassi Joins As Managing Director
Transportation Department cracks down on airlines withholding refunds for canceled flights
Bear gets trapped in car, destroys interior
Cycling apparel company adding full-service bike repair to visitor center
German sales plunge in August to lowest level since 1992
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California homeless camp fire damages 2 bridges, disrupts public transportation Austin finishes half of its bicycle network, expects to complete entire 400-mile system by 2025 The Top 10 Automotive Concepts that automotive enthusiasts will be itching to see on the road! Oregon Transportation Commission, wary of I-5 Rose Quarter project’s growing price tag, grants conditional approval Woman dies after being hit by car in North Windham Friday night Silk-FAW Continues To Poach Italy’s Automotive Talent, As Lamborghini’s Katia Bassi Joins As Managing Director Transportation Department cracks down on airlines withholding refunds for canceled flights Bear gets trapped in car, destroys interior Cycling apparel company adding full-service bike repair to visitor center German sales plunge in August to lowest level since 1992
Jul
2021
13

28-year-old man arrested after police chase ends in vehicle crashing into a building

BATON ROUGE, La. (WAFB) – A dramatic scene unfolded directly across from the WAFB studio in downtown Baton Rouge after a driver reportedly jumped from a moving vehicle during a police chase, causing a major crash.

According to the East Baton Rouge Parish Sheriff’s Office, Dedrick Weatherspoon, 28, was arrested and later charged.

Weatherspoon is facing a list of charges including aggravated flight from an officer, aggravated criminal damage to property, equipment violation, display of license plate, driving with suspended drivers license and failure to register vehicle.

An officer at the scene says the chase began as a routine traffic stop. Weatherspoon allegedly refused to stop and eventually bailed from the vehicle.

The vehicle then continued moving and crashed into the Rabenhorst Funeral Home located directly across from WAFB.

Along with damage to the building, the vehicle also hit a power pole, causing a temporary disruption to power service.

A footage from a security camera in the Channel 9 parking lot, watch now as a 28-year-old jumps from a moving vehicle as police chased him next to the television station late Thursday night. “I just seen him coming up the street. You know, it was about eight cop cars just following him. Next thing you knew, he ended up hitting the pole and run into the building,” says Darian Thomas who was incident last night.

Multiple power crews spent hours trying to get things repaired—even having to cut off power to many businesses in the area for a while. Those power interruptions might even last until tomorrow as more repairs are made. “You have a number of commercial businesses and other businesses out there and the impact of these facilities that’s why the repairs are going to take a lot longer into tomorrow because of the way the impact and the damage occurred as well as the type of equipment that was impact,” says David Freese who is a Spokesperson with Entergy Louisiana.

For crews to safely complete the repairs to electric equipment near the intersection of St. Joseph and Government, an outage has been scheduled for Saturday, July 10 around 8 a.m. It will last 4-5 hours and affect approximately 100 customers in the immediate area of the damaged equipment.

Again, we appreciate our customers’ patience as we work to make the repairs quickly and, above all, safely.

Click here to

Jul
2021
13

New Transportation Program Connects Workers To ‘Last Mile’ Of Employment

For almost two years, Lester Williams took the bus from Milwaukee’s Northside to suburban New Berlin, where he worked 12-hour days in quality control at Schoeneck Containers Inc. The trip took anywhere from 45 minutes to an hour, even though the factory was only about 16 miles from his home.

Williams said it was one of the best jobs he ever had. But when the route was eliminated in 2019, the only bus that got him near his job brought him to Brookfield Square mall, more than 3 miles away.

“A lot of times people just walked, and it’s kind of expensive to spend $5, $6, $10 just to get to that last mile with Uber or Lyft,” Williams said. “I know when I did it, I called Uber maybe twice, and I thought, it would be better for me to just walk.”

Williams eventually lost his job because of transportation issues. But his manager, who he had a good relationship with, helped him find a job closer to home. He said not having a car shouldn’t keep people from work.

“A lot of employers have solid employees that need help with transportation,” Williams said. “It would cost companies nothing to say here’s an Uber pass. If employers covered that last mile, it wouldn’t be an issue.”

The “last mile” challenge is common in the suburbs, where manufacturing, warehouses and retail jobs are far from fixed transit routes, making it difficult for people without cars to get to work.

Sam Rikkers, deputy secretary of the Wisconsin Economic Development Corp., said the jobs usually pay between $13 and $18 an hour, which is enough to warrant traveling a long distance, but not enough to buy and maintain a reliable car.

“Talking to employers all over the state — and absolutely all over the greater Milwaukee region, workforce is their greatest concern,” Rikkers said. “There is not a massive pool of folks looking for jobs and employers need to find innovative ways to get people to work.”

WEDC and the United Way of Greater Milwaukee are each contributing about $30,000 to a pilot program run by the Regional Transit Leadership Council that will study how to bring “last mile” service to the Milwaukee suburbs of Brookfield, New Berlin, Franklin and Oak Creek. The study is expected to be completed in Spring 2022.

Roughly half of jobs in southeast Wisconsin lie outside a 90-minute bus commute, and that figure is higher in manufacturing and retail sectors, often located in suburban areas.

Close to 20 percent of Milwaukee residents lack access to cars, a figure far higher in high-poverty parts of the city. 

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In 2017, the Wisconsin Policy Forum researched the “last mile” and found it was a major impediment to the success of bus routes aiming to connect central city workers to suburban jobs.

“It’s great to see regional leaders renewing their focus on this barrier, and it’s particularly timely given

Jul
2021
13

Dramatic video shows Michigan cop pull man from fiery car wreck

Dramatic video footage shows a Michigan cop running toward the flaming wreckage of a car – then pulling the dazed driver to safety.

Harper Woods Officer Luke Pauly’s bodycam footage shows him speeding to the near a massive crash on Interstate 94 outside Detroit last Sunday.

Flames blaze and smoke pours from a car in the distance while traffic is at a standstill.

Pauly, 30, then sprints towards the engulfed car as skid marks, twisted metal and debris from the crash are seen scattered across the highway and its shoulder. People along the highway tell Pauly someone’s in a car that apparently flipped in the crash.

“He’s in the car?” Pauly is heard asking bystanders as scorching fire is seen in the distance.

When he gets to the car, a man is seen on the passenger side, reaching over the window to clutch the door handle on the outside. The man was the driver, who Pauly told WDIV may have ended up in the passenger seat by force of the impact.

The driver attempted to escape through the passenger side as the flames spread throughout the vehicle.
The driver attempted to escape through the passenger side as the flames spread throughout the vehicle.
WDIV
Harper Woods officer Luke Pauly rushed to save a man from a burning car on Interstate 94 in Michigan.
Harper Woods officer Luke Pauly rushed to save a man from a burning car on Interstate 94 in Michigan.
WDIV
Neither Pauly nor the man suffered serious injuries.
Neither Pauly nor the man suffered serious injuries.
WDIV

He was apparently fighting off passing out to try to get away from the blaze as it grew in intensity.

In footage from the camera of another officer, Pauly is seen pulling the man from the wreck by his arms, dragging him across the pavement until he’s a safe distance from the flames. The man was coming in and out of consciousness, reports said.

“I was worried it was gonna blow up,” he told FOX 2. “I never knew that cars don’t explode so it was popping … I think it was from the tires.”

The man is recovering and no one was injured despite the severity of the accident, the station reported.

The officer told WDIV things may have turned out more grim if police arrived even a few minutes later.

“All I could think was perfect timing,” Pauly said. “Glad we got here.”

Jul
2021
13

Study provides insights into achieving equitable bicycling infrastructure

BOULDER, Colo. (BRAIN) — A study measuring how well bicycling infrastructure advanced transportation alternatives across socioeconomic and demographic groups will help guide cities building equitable infrastructure, according to the Better Bike Share Partnership.

“The study will provide a different narrative for understanding the potential impacts of these investments,” said Kiran Herbert, Better Bike Share Partnership local programs writer and content manager.

Entities that make up the Better Bike Share Partnership — a collaboration funded by The JPB Foundation to build equitable bike share systems — are the city of Philadelphia, the National Association of City Transportation Officials, and the PeopleForBikes Foundation.

“That doesn’t let cities off the hook for doing good community engagement — in fact, it elevates the importance of working in partnership with community members to address their needs and involve them in the planning process,” Herbert said. “This study to me says, ‘Yes, build those bike lanes — but do so in a way that engages the community from the start and accounts for specific needs throughout.'”

Long term, Herbert suggested, the study provides another model for measuring the impacts of implementing infrastructure.

“So cities must acknowledge and account for that,” Herbert said. “I think it also offers a lot of food for thought when it comes to thinking about mobility justice and what encompasses gentrification. Sure, we might not be displacing folks with bike lanes, but that doesn’t mean we’re doing a great job of listening to them and accounting for the needs of a wide subset of people.”

The study by Nicholas N. Ferenchak of the University of New Mexico and Wesley E. Marshall of the University of Colorado looked at 11,010 bike facility miles over 10 years (2010-2019) in 29 cities and suggests inequalities in bike infrastructure outside downtown areas.

The cities studied were Chicago; Houston; Philadelphia; Dallas; Austin, Texas; Seattle; San Francisco; Seattle; Denver; Washington; Memphis, Tennessee; Portland, Oregon; Oklahoma City; Baltimore; Kansas City; Minneapolis; Alexandria, Virginia; Pasadena, California; Fullerton, California; Columbia, South Carolina; New Haven, Connecticut; Norman, Oklahoma; Cambridge, Massachusetts; Boulder, Colorado; Iowa City, Iowa; Passaic, New Jersey; Eau Claire, Wisconsin; Portland, Maine; Youngstown, Ohio; and East Orange, New Jersey.

“While lower-income white neighborhoods — where we might expect lower vehicle ownership and higher want or need of access to safe and comfortable active transportation facilities — had high levels of bike facilities installed, (people of color) areas had the lowest rates of overall installation,” the study’s authors wrote. “Lower-income white block groups had 45.9% more bike facilities installed than lower-income POC block groups and 46.2% more facilities installed than higher-income POC block groups.”

According to the study, the causality relationships between bike facilities and socioeconomic and demographic changes were “largely non-significant.” And for advocates concerned about new bike lanes resulting in forcing out historically marginalized groups, the study suggests otherwise.

“Bike lanes have been described as ‘a tell-tale sign of gentrification,’ and it is not uncommon to see popular press articles such as ‘Why are bike lanes such heated

Jul
2021
13

France, Germany push back against EU banning combustion cars by 2035

PARIS — France is resisting the European Union effectively phasing out combustion-engine car sales by 2035, advocating for a more lenient target for the end of the decade and a longer leash for plug-in hybrid models.

The French government backs a target to reduce emissions from cars 55 percent by 2030 from 2021 levels and for hybrids to remain on the market for longer, an official in President Emmanuel Macron’s office said.

The European Commission is expected to unveil on Wednesday plans to require emissions to fall by 65 percent from 2030 and drop to zero from 2035.

The French official, who asked not to be identified, commented after Macron met with top executives at auto companies including Stellantis and Renault, suppliers Valeo, Faurecia and Plastic Omnium, as well as labor representatives to discuss the transition to electric vehicles.

German Transport Minister Andreas Scheuer also warned the commission against setting too strict targets for the auto industry.

“I believe that all car and truck manufacturers are aware that stricter specifications are coming. But they have to be technically feasible,” he told the German press agency DPA.

Scheuer said he supported the shift to battery-powered drivetrains for passenger cars as fossil fuel combustion engines are phased out. For heavy trucks “there needs to be more focus on hydrogen,” he said.

The French and German positions could signal a battle is brewing within the EU over new climate targets and how they will affect the auto industry.

The effective ban on combustion engines by 2035 is part of an ambitious plan to align the region’s economy with more aggressive climate targets. It would also mean a faster phasing-out of hybrids than some executives and labor officials expected.

The new EU emission targets would be significantly stricter than existing fleet-wide goals requiring a 37.5 percent emissions reduction by 2030. While the auto industry has been bracing for tougher rules, the meeting with Macron was part of an effort to gain support for a slower phasing out of combustion engines.

La Plateforme Automobile, or PFA, France’s main lobby group for the industry, estimates 17.5 billion euros ($21 billion) in investment is needed in the country by the middle of the decade to develop batteries, charging stations, hydrogen and related services.

The phasing out of combustion engines could lead to a loss of roughly 100,000 auto jobs in France through 2035 and the shutdown of manufacturing sites, according to a PFA presentation. The industry directly employs about 190,000 people currently.

Production of electric and fuel cell vehicles is less labor-intensive compared with hybrids and those with diesel or gasoline engines, the PFA said. France lags countries including Germany, Japan and the U.S. in terms of the number of robots used by the auto industry, and French workers are more expensive than their counterparts in eastern and southern European countries.

Bloomberg contributed to this report